Advertising
Advertising

How Online Tutoring Programs Can Help Your Struggling Child

How Online Tutoring Programs Can Help Your Struggling Child

When your child comes home with a less-than-stellar report card, the knee-jerk reaction is often to send them to a tutor for extra help.

While one-on-one, in-person tutoring may help a struggling learner understand a single subject or concept a little better, the child may end up facing similar struggles a little farther down the road if the focus of the tutoring sessions was on simply completing assignments rather than learning concepts – and learning how to learn.

Online tutoring services, such as Mentored, seek to improve upon in-person tutoring sessions and make learning more accessible, individualized, and student-driven. In doing so, they don’t simply teach academics – they teach students how to learn, and how to live.

On-the-Go Learning

There’s no arguing the fact that smartphones and mobile devices have become fairly ubiquitous – even when it comes to children and teens. While the initial reaction may be to assume that the only reason these devices exist is to get kids hooked on games and social media, they absolutely can serve a much more productive purpose.

Advertising

Students in need of tutoring can utilize services like Mentored wherever they go. The positive effects of this accessibility simply cannot be overstated. Because of these tutoring apps, learning is no longer something that only happens within the walls of a classroom; it can happen anywhere, at any time. Students can access lessons, multimedia, and other materials while waiting for a ride, sitting in the lunchroom, or after they get dropped off in the morning.

In-person tutoring works around a fixed schedule – and a time limit. Of course, this means tutors have a finite amount of time in which to (hopefully) get their students up-to-speed with the course material. When utilizing online tutoring services, students can spend as much time as they need reviewing materials, replaying videos, and checking in with their tutors in order to understand a concept they are struggling with.

Lastly, mobile tutoring allows students and tutors from across the country to connect as if they were in the same room. This can benefit families in less-populated areas of the country where professional tutoring centers and services are few and far between. Tutors from services such as Mentored have the opportunity to work with students of many different backgrounds, and in doing so increase their knowledge of how all students learn best.

Individualized Support

In a perfect world, tutors would work to ensure that all tutoring sessions – on and offline – are individualized. Unfortunately, many times tutors simply go through lessons and units in the exact same way with each student they work with.

Advertising

While most online educational sites, such as Khan Academy, provide overarching lectures that aren’t targeted at any specific demographic, services like Mentored provide students with individualized instruction, as well as follow-up materials that are tailored to each student’s needs.

Vice President of Education at Mentored Alan Cashdollar says, “It’s like teachers giving each student a completely individualized homework assignment.”

This reinforces the notion that learning isn’t just about completing an assignment – it’s about understanding the complex nuances behind the assignments at hand. When students are provided with lessons, assignments, and projects that actually mean something to them, they are more likely to take ownership of their own learning, and understand the importance behind what they’re learning – rather than learning material just to regurgitate it on a test and promptly forget it afterwards.

Student-Driven Learning

Instruction within schools is, traditionally, teacher-centered: The instructor stands at the front of the classroom, lectures to her students, gives a test to assess comprehension, and moves on. Although this has recently begun to change in classrooms across the country, many – if not most – students complete assignments not because they want to, but because their teacher told them to.

Advertising

The problem with this mentality is students learn to be reactive not just in school, but in all aspects of life. This can manifest in something as simple as a kid cleaning his room not because he likes the way it looks when it’s tidied up, but because his mom told him to.

But the mentality can have much more detrimental effects. For example, a freshman in college may be used to being given assignments by his high school teacher and completing them because it’s mandatory. However, in many lecture courses, weekly reading and assignments may only be “suggested,” and not completing them won’t have any direct effect on the student’s overall grade. Of course, the student who blows off these suggested assignments will not only fail to learn the material he needs to know in order to pass the class, but he also will lack the background knowledge to move further in his college career.

With online tutoring services, learning is placed squarely in the hands of students. If they don’t understand the tutor’s explanation or need a little more assistance, they can contact the tutor whenever need be. Unlike in-person tutors – who are only available for a set period of time – online tutors make themselves available for quick check-ins throughout the week if their students need their help.

Of course, this means students have to be honest with themselves, as well as their tutors, with what they know and don’t know. Services like Mentored work with children to alleviate the idea that they need to know everything – and strengthen the notion that it’s okay to ask for help. Cashdollar believes asking for help “is not a sign of weakness. It’s a sign of self-awareness.”

Advertising

Proactive Learning

While many parents sign their children up for tutoring sessions to help them when they struggle with a certain subject or topic, online mentoring programs do more than just help them with their homework: They prepare children to be lifelong learners.

As alluded to before, students need to take control of their own learning in order to be successful in life. It’s not enough to simply know enough to complete an assignment or pass a test. Unfortunately, this is often the aim of one-on-one tutoring sessions. Parents will hire a tutor when they notice their child is struggling, and will discontinue services once their grades begin to improve.

But online tutoring services don’t limit a child’s learning to the material the teacher wants them to learn. In fact, they don’t place a limit at all. Services like Mentored teach children to be proactive in their learning, which fosters in young students the notion that, no matter how much you think you know, there is always more to learn.

Featured photo credit: Computer Science Education Week / CMLibrary Charlotte Mecklenburg Library / Flickr via farm9.staticflickr.com

More by this author

Matt Duczeminski

A passionate writer who shares lifestlye tips on Lifehack

8 Steps to Ensure You Accomplish Your Goals 6 Steps to Ensure You Keep Reaching For Your Goals 5 Ways to Lessen Back Pain 12 Self-Destructive Habits to Eliminate for a Positive Life 7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

Trending in Child Education

1 Research Finds The Effects Of Homework On Elementary School Students, And The Results Are Surprising 2 5 Tips For Teaching Money Management To Children 3 If You Want Your Kids To Be Successful, Don’t Protect Them In This Way 4 Helpful Things Your Child Should Learn Before They Turn 18 5 The Lessons Chess Can Teach Your Children

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Published on February 11, 2021

3 Positive Discipline Strategies That Are Best For Your Child

3 Positive Discipline Strategies That Are Best For Your Child

I’m old enough to remember how the cane at school was used for punishment. My dad is old enough to think that banning corporal punishment in schools resulted in today’s poorly disciplined youth. With all of this as my early experiences, there was a time when I would have been better assigned to write about how to negatively discipline your child.

What changed? Thankfully, my wife showed me different approaches for discipline that were very positive. Plus, I was open to learning.

What has not changed is that kids are full of problems with impulses and emotions that flip from sad to happy, then angry in a moment. Though we’re not that different as adults with stress, anxiety, lack of sleep, and stimulants such as sugar and caffeine in our diets.

Punishment as Discipline?

What this means is that we usually take the easy path when a child misbehaves and punish them. Punishment may solve an isolated problem, but it’s not really teaching the kids anything useful in the long term.

Probably it’s time for me to be clear about what I mean by punishment and discipline as these terms are often used interchangeably, but they are quite different.

Discipline VS. Punishment

Punishment is where we inflict pain or suffering on our child as a penalty. Discipline means to teach. They’re quite the opposite, but you’ll notice that teachers, parents, and coaches often confuse the two words.

So, as parents, we have to have clear goals to teach our kids. It’s a long-term plan—using strategies that will have the longest-lasting impact on our kids are the best use of our time and energy.

If you’re clear about what you want to achieve, then it becomes easier to find the best strategy. The better we are at responding when our kids misbehave or do not follow our guidance, the better the results are going to be.

Advertising

3 Positive Discipline Strategies for Your Child

Stay with me as I appreciate that a lot of people who read these blogs do not always have children with impulse control. We’ve had a lot of kids in our martial arts classes that were the complete opposite. They had concentration issues, hyperactive, and disruptive to the other children.

The easy solution is to punish their parents by removing the kids from the class or punish the child with penalties such as time outs and burpees. Yes, it was tempting to do all of this, but one of our club values is that we pull you up rather than push you down.

This means it’s a long-term gain to build trust and confidence, which is destroyed by constant punishments.

Here are the discipline strategies we used to build trust and confidence with these hyperactive kids.

1. Patience

The first positive discipline strategy is to simply be patient. The more patient you are, the more likely you are to get results. Remember I said that we need to build trust and connection. You’ll get further with this goal using patience.

As a coach, sometimes I was not the best person for this role, but we had other coaches in the club that could step in here. As a parent, you may not have this luxury, so it’s really important to recognize any improvements that you see and celebrate them.

2. Redirection

The second strategy we use is redirection. It’s important with a redirection to take “no” out of the equation. Choices are a great alternative.

Imagine a scenario where you’re in a restaurant and your kid is wailing. The hard part here is getting your child to stop screaming long enough for you to build a connection. Most parents have calming strategies and if you practice them with your child, they are more likely to be effective.

Advertising

In the first moment of calm, you can say “Your choice to scream and cry in public is not a good one. It would be best to say, Dad. What can I do to get ice-cream?” You can replace this with an appropriate option.

The challenge with being calm and redirecting is that we need to be clear-minded, focused, and really engaged at the moment. If you’re on your phone, talking with friends or family, thinking about work or the bills, you’ll miss this opportunity to discipline in a way that has long-term benefits.

3. Repair and Ground Rules

The third positive discipline strategy is to repair and use ground rules. Once you’ve given the better option and it has been taken, you have a chance to repair this behavior to lessen its occurrence to better yet, prevent it from happening again. And by setting appropriate ground rules, you can make this a long-term win by helping your child improve their behavior.

It’s these ground rules that help you correct the poor choices of your child and direct the behavior that you want to see.

Consequences Versus Ultimatums

When I was a child and being punished. My parents worked in a busy business for long hours, so their default was to go to ultimatums. “Do that again and you’re grounded for a week,” or “If I catch you doing X, you’ll go to bed without dinner”.

Looking back, this worked to a point. But the flip side is that I remembered more of the ultimatums than the happier times. I’ve learned through trial and error with my own kids that consequences are more effective while not breaking down trust.

What to Do When Ground Rules Get Broken?

It’s on the consequences that you use when the ground rules are broken.

In the martial arts class, when the hyperactive student breaks the ground rules. They would miss a turn in a game or go to the back of the line in a queue. We do not want to shame the child by isolating them. But on the flip side, there should be clear ground rules and proportionate consequences.

Advertising

Yes, there are times when we would like to exclude the student from the class, the club, and even the universe. Again, it’s here that patience is so important and probably impulse control too. With an attainable consequence, you can maintain trust and you’re more likely to get the long-term behavior that you’re looking to achieve.

Interestingly, we would occasionally hear a strategy from parents that little Kevin has been misbehaving at home with his sister or something similar. He likes martial arts training, so the parent would react by removing Kevin from the martial arts class as a punishment.

We would suggest that this would remove Kevin from an environment where he is behaving positively. Removing him from this is likely to be detrimental to the change you would like to see. He may even feel shame when he returns to the class and loses all the progress he’s made.

Alternatives to Punishment

Another option is to tell Kevin to write a letter to his sister, apologizing for his behavior, and explaining how he is going to behave in the future.

If your child is too young to write, give the apology face to face. For the apology to feel sincere, there is some value to pre-framing or practicing this between yourself and your child before they give it to the intended person.

Don’t expect them to know the ground rules or what you’re thinking! It will be clearer to your child and better received with some practice. You can practice along the lines of: “X is the behavior I did, Y is what I should have done, and Z is my promise to you for how I’m going to act in the future.” You can replace XYZ with the appropriate actions.

It does not need to be a letter or in person, it can even be a video. But there has to be an intention to repair the broken ground rule. If you try these strategies, that is become fully engaged with them and you’re still getting nowhere.

But what to do if these strategies do not work? Then there is plenty to gain by seeking the help of an expert. Chances are that something is interfering or limiting their development.

Advertising

This does not mean that your child has a neurological deficiency, although this may be the root cause. But it means that you can get an objective view and help on how to create the changes that you would like to see. Remember that using positive discipline strategies is better than mere punishment.

There are groups that you can chat with for help. Family Lives UK has the aim of ensuring that all parents have somewhere to turn before they reached a crisis point. The NSPCC also provides a useful guide to positive parenting that you can download.[1]

Bottom Line

So, there your go, the three takeaways on strategies you can use for positively disciplining your child. The first one is about you! Be patient, be present, and think about what is best for the long term. AKA, avoid ultimatums and punishment. The second is to use a redirect, then repair and repeat (ground rules) as your 3-step method of discipline.

Using these positive discipline strategies require you to be fully engaged with your child. Again, being impulsive breaks trust and you lose some of the gains you’ve both worked hard to achieve.

Lastly, consequences are better than punishment. Plus, avoid shaming, especially in public at all costs.

I hope this blog has been useful, and remember that you should be more focused on repairing bad behavior because being proactive and encouraging good behavior with rewards, fun, and positive emotions takes less effort than repairing the bad.

More Tips on How To Discipline Your Child

Featured photo credit: Leo Rivas via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] NSPCC Learning: Positive parenting

Read Next