Advertising
Advertising

7 Tips On Writing Your First Résumé Which Will Get You Hired

7 Tips On Writing Your First Résumé Which Will Get You Hired

Fresh college graduates often face a conundrum when the time comes to land their first job. Most companies prefer to hire people that have some experience. New graduates don’t get jobs because they have no experience, so they can’t receive the experience they need to qualify for the job!

It isn’t always like that, of course, otherwise there would be thousands of unemployed new graduates and experienced employees hopping from one job to the other. However, as a fresh graduate, you have to stand out from the competition to get a foot through the door. You need to highlight your qualifications and skills in such a way that you secure that crucial first interview.

The only way you can normally do that is to have a kick-ass résumé. Here are some tips from the experts that can help you get hired.

Keep it short and simple (KISS)

Advertising

1

    In a Forbes interview with recruitment agency Babich & Associates President and Unbeatable Résumés author Tony Beshara, he advises keeping content short and simple as the most important feature of an unbeatable résumé. “It has to be simple. No more than two pages. The average résumé gets read in 10 seconds. Be sure the content is on a level any high school senior could understand.” He also advises to avoid fancy fonts, templates, and fluff such as objectives and summaries.

    Form matters

    2

      Resumesplanet top résumé writer, Josh Waite, states that form matters. “Make sure that your résumé is free from grammatical and typographical errors. You would be surprised at how quickly it can go south for you even if you have the most impressive qualifications, if you can’t spell.” With so many résumés making it through the door, HR professionals will use any excuse to thin out the pile quickly. Bad form on a résumé or cover letter is one of the quickest, as it reflects on the professionalism of the applicant.

      Highlight your accomplishments

      Advertising

      3

        Hiring professionals quickly sum up a candidate’s fit for the job based on their personal accomplishments. Make a point of highlighting yours by giving it a prominent place in your résumé. If you worked an internship in the same field, make sure you put that in as the first line in the “Professional skills” section.

        Columbia Business School career advisor Janet Raiffa says, “It’s your résumé, and it should focus on what you did rather than what your team or organization did. Don’t lie or inflate your accomplishments when you’re writing your résumé, but don’t be modest either.” She adds, “It doesn’t need to be unique in terms of formatting, or funny, or overly creative. You want to stand out based on academic or professional achievement.”

        Have a professional email address

        4

          One of the first things a recruiter will see on your résumé is your contact information, and the most important one is your email address. If you want to come off as the next great hire, avoid using childish email addresses like sweetumstweetums@yahoo.com or beerpongking@live.com. It might have amused your classmates, but it does not make a good impression on a potential employer.

          Advertising

          Give details

          5

            While it is important to be concise, your résumé should still have all the relevant information that a recruiter might need to know about you. When putting in your skills or qualifications, be specific. Point University Center for Calling and Career coordinator Melissa Roberts advises against using vague words such as “talented” and “hardworking,” because these do not impart any actual information to the reader regarding the abilities of the applicant. Other words to avoid are “involved in” and “assisted.” If you are a member of the debate team, mention if you won any awards. If you had a summer job at McDonald’s, mention if you were ever an employee of the month. Accomplishments denote excellence, dedication, commitment, and/or diligence, qualities that recruiters look for in new graduates.

            Customize it

            6

              Chances are, you will be applying for different positions in different companies. Even if the positions are related, i.e. marketing assistant vs. market researcher, you can tweak your résumé so that it is precisely for the particular position. You also have to consider the mission and vision of the company. If the company puts a premium on environmental protection, for example, highlight any volunteer work you did that relate to that. Cut out any information that is not relevant to the position or the company.

              Advertising

              Come on strong

              9

                Because hiring professionals only spend a few seconds reading a résumé on the first pass, it is important to catch their attention in the first few lines. Have a strong opening line to set the tone for the reader. Include the position for which you are applying, and why you are the best candidate for it. It shows consideration for the reader, who may be filtering applicants for several positions, and demonstrates confidence in your ability to be up to the task.

                It is important to remember that your résumé is the only thing the hiring professional knows about you. You can be the most charming, persuasive, and proactive person in the world, but you will not have a chance to demonstrate the many excellent qualities you have if your do not pay close attention to creating your résumé. In many cases, recruiters will only see you when you come for the first interview, and that will never happen if your résumé sucks. These seven tips from experts can help you craft a résumé that can get you hired.

                Featured photo credit: Octavio Fossatti/Unsplash via unsplash.com

                More by this author

                How to Secure WordPress – Infographic 7 Tips On Writing Your First Résumé Which Will Get You Hired 7 Steps to Go From Slacker to Writing Machine

                Trending in Career Advice

                110 Job Search Tools Every Jobseekers Need To Know About 210 Websites To Learn Something New In 30 Minutes A Day 350 Great People To Follow On LinkedIn, No Matter Your Industry 4If You Have This Key Behavior, You’ll Be More Successful Than 90% Of People 5How To Climb Up Your Career Ladder Faster Than Others In A Big Corporate.

                Read Next

                Advertising
                Advertising

                Last Updated on August 16, 2018

                10 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader

                10 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader

                When you try to think of a leader at your place of work, you might think of your boss – you know, the supervisor in the tasteful office down the hall.

                However, bosses are not the only leaders in the office, and not every boss has mastered the art of excellent leadership. Maybe the best leader you know is the co-worker sitting at the desk next to yours who is always willing to loan out her stapler and help you problem solve.

                You see, a boss’ main priority is to efficiently cross items off of the corporate to-do list, while a true leader both completes tasks and works to empower and motivate the people he or she interacts with on a daily basis.

                A leader is someone who works to improve things instead of focusing on the negatives. People acknowledge the authority of a boss, but people cherish a true leader.

                Puzzled about what it takes to be a great leader? Let’s take a look at the difference between a boss and a leader, and why cultivating quality leadership skills is essential for people who really want to make a positive impact.

                1. Leaders are compassionate human beings; bosses are cold.

                It can be easy to equate professionalism with robot-like impersonal behavior. Many bosses stay holed up in their offices and barely ever interact with staff.

                Even if your schedule is packed, you should always make time to reach out to the people around you. Remember that when you ask someone to share how they are feeling, you should be prepared to be vulnerable and open in your communication as well.

                Does acting human at the office sound silly? It’s not.

                A lack of compassion in the office leads to psychological turmoil, whereas positive connection leads to healthier staff.[1]

                If people feel that you are being open, honest and compassionate with them, they will feel able to approach your office with what is on their minds, leading to a more productive and stress-free work environment.

                Advertising

                2. Leaders say “we”; bosses say “I”.

                Practice developing a team-first mentality when thinking and speaking. In meetings, talk about trying to meet deadlines as a team instead of using accusatory “you” phrases. This makes it clear that you are a part of the team, too, and that you are willing to work hard and support your team members.

                Let me explain:

                A “we” mentality shifts the office dynamic from “trying to make the boss happy” to a spirit of teamwork, goal-setting, and accomplishment.

                A “we” mentality allows for the accountability and community that is essential in the modern day workplace.

                3. Leaders develop and invest in people; bosses use people.

                Unfortunately, many office climates involve people using others to get what they want or to climb the corporate ladder. This is another example of the “me first” mentality that is so toxic in both office environments and personal relationships.

                Instead of using others or focusing on your needs, think about how you can help other people grow.

                Use your building blocks of compassion and team-mentality to stay attuned to the needs of others note the areas in which you can help them develop. A great leader wants to see his or her people flourish.

                Make a list of ways you can invest in your team members to help them develop personally and professionally, and then take action!

                4. Leaders respect people; bosses are fear-mongering.

                Earning respect from everyone on your team will take time and commitment, but the rewards are worth every ounce of effort.

                A boss who is a poor leader may try to control the office through fear and bully-like behavior. Employees who are petrified about their performance or who feel overwhelmed and stressed by unfair deadlines are probably working for a boss who uses a fear system instead of a respect system.

                Advertising

                What’s the bottom line?

                Work to build respect among your team by treating everyone with fairness and kindness. Maintain a positive tone and stay reliable for those who approach you for help.

                5. Leaders give credit where it’s due; bosses only take credits.

                Looking for specific ways to gain respect from your colleagues and employees? There is no better place to start than with the simple act of giving credit where it is due.

                Don’t be tempted to take credit for things you didn’t do, and always go above and beyond to generously acknowledge those who worked on a project and performed well.

                You might be wondering how you can get started:

                • Begin by simply noticing which team member contributes what during your next project at work.
                • If possible, make mental notes. Remember that these notes should not be about ways in which team members are failing, but about ways in which they are excelling.
                • Depending on your leadership style, let people know how well they are doing either in private one-on-one meetings or in a group setting. Be honest and generous in your communication about a person’s performance.

                6. Leaders see delegation as their best friend; bosses see it as an enemy.

                If delegation is a leader’s best friend, then micromanagement is the enemy.

                Delegation equates to trust and micromanagement equates to distrust. Nothing is more frustrating for an employee than feeling that his or her every movement is being critically observed.

                Encourage trust in your office by delegating important tasks and acknowledging that your people are capable, smart individuals who can succeed!

                Delegation is a great way to cash in on the positive benefits of a psychological phenomenon called a self-fulfilling prophecy. In a self-fulfilling prophecy, a person’s expectations of another person can cause the expectations to be fulfilled.[2]

                In other words, if you truly believe that your team member can handle a project or task, he or she is more likely to deliver.

                Advertising

                Learn how to delegate in my other article:

                How to Delegate Work (the Definitive Guide for Successful Leaders)

                7. Leaders work hard; bosses let others do the work.

                Delegation is not an excuse to get out of hard work. Instead of telling people to go accomplish the hardest work alone, make it clear that you are willing to pitch in and help with the hardest work of all when the need arises.

                Here’s the deal:

                Showing others that you work hard sets the tone for your whole team and will spur them on to greatness.

                The next time you catch yourself telling someone to “go”, a.k.a accomplish a difficult task alone, change your phrasing to “let’s go”, showing that you are totally willing to help and support.

                8. Leaders think long-term; bosses think short-term.

                A leader who only utilizes short-term thinking is someone who cannot be prepared or organized for the future. Your colleagues or staff members need to know that they can trust you to have a handle on things not just this week, but next month or even next year.

                Display your long-term thinking skills in group talks and meetings by sharing long-term hopes or concerns. Create plans for possible scenarios and be prepared for emergencies.

                For example, if you know that you are losing someone on your team in a few months, be prepared to share a clear plan of how you and the remaining team members can best handle the change and workload until someone new is hired.

                9. Leaders are like your colleagues; bosses are just bosses.

                Another word for colleague is collaborator. Make sure your team knows that you are “one of them” and that you want to collaborate or work side by side.

                Advertising

                Not getting involved in the going ons of the office is a mistake because you will miss out on development and connection opportunities.

                As our regular readers know, I love to remind people of the importance of building routines into each day. Create a routine that encourages you to leave your isolated office and collaborate with others. Spark healthy habits that benefit both you and your co-workers.

                10. Leaders put people first; bosses put results first.

                Bosses without crucial leadership training may focus on process and results instead of people. They may stick to a pre-set systems playbook even when employees voice new ideas or concerns.

                Ignoring people’s opinions for the sake of company tradition like this is never truly beneficial to an organization.

                Here’s what I mean by process over people:

                Some organizations focus on proper structures or systems as their greatest assets instead of people. I believe that people lend real value to an organization, and that focusing on the development of people is a key ingredient for success in leadership.

                Learning to be a leader is an ongoing adventure.

                This list of differences makes it clear that, unlike an ordinary boss, a leader is able to be compassionate, inclusive, generous, and hard-working for the good of the team.

                Instead of being a stereotypical scary or micromanaging-obsessed boss, a quality leader is able to establish an atmosphere of respect and collaboration.

                Whether you are new to your work environment or a seasoned administrator, these leadership traits will help you get a jump start so that you can excel as a leader and positively impact the people around you.

                For more inspiration and guidance, you can even start keeping tabs on some of the world’s top leadership experts. With an adventurous and positive attitude, anyone can learn good leadership.

                Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

                Reference

                Read Next