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13 Myths and 13 Truths About Today’s Antidepressants

13 Myths and 13 Truths About Today’s Antidepressants

You can thank tuberculosis for the 29 antidepressants we now have on the market.

No, that’s not an urban myth, that’s actually true.

Sixty years ago, a drug called iproniazid was being used to treat tuberculosis.  But when the doctors discovered their previously discouraged TB patients dancing in the hospital hallways one evening, researchers began studying its possible impact on depression.

It turned out to be effective in treating depression in many people.  Unfortunately, doctors learned the hard way that iproniazid came with a notable danger: if while taking the drug the person drank wine, ate cheese, or consumed any other food that had the amino acid tyramine in it, the person could experience a drastic spike in blood pressure that in some cases resulted in sudden death.

And so the search was on for a drug that could treat depression without running the risk of killing the patient.

Since then, controversy about the use and effectiveness of these drugs has grown about as immense as their popularity, and the conversation around antidepressants has created two distinct camps: one declaring that antidepressants are life-saving and the other insisting they are somewhere between worthless and down right dangerous.

With emotions running high, it’s not surprising that a slew of myths from both sides have crept into social media, making the discussion even more confusing.

In the interest of science and truth, below are 13 of the more popular myths with fact-based commentary that comes from the scientific community and my thirty-plus years as a psychiatric nurse.

MYTH #1: Antidepressants are the best and fastest way to treat depression.

TRUTH: The chances that antidepressants are the “best” treatment for depression are only about 30% statistically.

Research has shown that of those who are clinically depressed, about 30% of them respond best to a consistent exercise routine.  Another 30% respond best to cognitive-behavioral therapy.  Only 30% respond best to antidepressant therapy.

But for that 30%, antidepressants can be a godsend.

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As to their speed, well, antidepressants are anything but fast.  Most antidepressants will take at least 1-2 weeks before their effects can be felt by the patient.  Sometimes, it’s as much as a month.  And for the full effects to be known, doctors ask you to wait 6 weeks.

Once they’ve kicked in, the dose may still need to be adjusted.  Since the best rule of thumb for prescribing antidepressants is “Start low, go slow,” your doctor will likely start you on the smallest dose available and then, if necessary, titrate the dose up after she’s seen how you’re responding… which will take more time.

Not exactly a “quick fix.”

MYTH #2: Antidepressants are basically serotonin supplements.

TRUTH: Antidepressants are not supplements. They are highly complex drugs that require careful monitoring by an experienced doctor.

Scientists have not yet found a way of capturing or manufacturing the brain hormones called neurotransmitters (like serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine) themselves, the way we’ve been able to manufacture insulin (for diabetes) or thyroxine (for hypothyroidism).

They have, however, found a way of making parts of the brain more sensitive to the neurotransmitters that are necessary for strong mental health, effectively increasing the levels that way.

But again, the increase in sensitivity takes time, which is why it takes 2-6 weeks before you really know how the medication is working for any given individual.

MYTH #3: Antidepressants will change your personality

TRUTH: The short answer to this is, No. They will not make you gregarious if you have always been shy or analytical if you have always been intuitive. Your core self will remain entirely intact.

But there’s a much bigger conversation going on about this that’s worth touching on.

Peter Breggin, the brilliant psychiatrist who wrote Talking Back to Prozac and Toxic Psychiatry pondered this philosophical point: when someone is born with a pessimistic view of themselves and the world–a sort of human Eeyore–is that their core personality? Or were they born with a chemical imbalance that is actually hiding their core personality?  

The answers to these questions are worth exploring.  But I’m a bit more of a pragmatist.  So my questions are more like this: Is the person in emotional pain because of a psychological inability to reach their dreams and aspirations?   And if so, does that person want to change? If the individual is suffering and wants to increase their ability to do something, I’m in favor of trying to help, as safely and with as much integrity as possible.

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MYTH #4: They are addictive

TRUTH: The chemicals that make up antidepressants have no addictive qualities.  According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine, one of the key components to addiction is the inability to control one’s behavior. Antidepressants have no such effect on the brain.

In fact, many of my patients on antidepressants report feeling that they have more control over their behavior and lives, not less.  They no longer feel imprisoned by the crushing fatigue and brain fog. They feel able to socialize again and be more productive.

It is true, however, that your body may get used to the drug being there (which would be considered more of a physical dependence, not addiction), and that a decrease in dosage may cause you some side effects of withdrawal. So it’s vital that when the time comes for you to stop taking an antidepressant that your doctor taper the dosage down slowly, sometimes over a period of weeks.  Stopping abruptly could cause some unpleasant, but temporary, symptoms, such as nausea, diarrhea, headache, lethargy, and other flu-like symptoms.

MYTH #5: Once you start taking them, you have to take them the rest of your life

TRUTH:  People who have suffered numerous bouts of depression, and who have also found relief from antidepressants, are usually urged to stay on medication indefinitely.  So yes, some people choose to take antidepressants for decades.

But the vast majority of people are on them for only a few months after they’ve achieved remission.

Why is the length of time so important?  Because studies have shown that continuing on antidepressants for several months after most of the symptoms are gone decreases the chance of a relapse later on.  Stopping the medication too soon could cause a return of the depressive symptoms.  And each occurrence of depression makes effective treatment just that much more difficult to achieve.

The more depressive episodes you’ve experienced, the longer you should stay on antidepressants. How long that is, is up to you and your physician.  So try not to cut corners by going off the medication too soon.

MYTH #6: They ruin your sex life

TRUTH:  Many of these medications effect sexual function in some people, especially at the beginning of therapy.  Sometimes it’s nothing more than they cause the sensations in the genitalia to be less intense at the beginning of therapy.  But in some cases, antidepressants can cause erectile dysfunction and make it difficult to experience orgasm, even after being on them for a while.

Fortunately, the percentage of people who experience this side effect is fairly low.  And if you are not currently active sexually, these side effects may be of little concern to you.

If you are sexually active, and you do have side effects that decrease your ability to participate or enjoy sexual contact, it’s important to be direct with your doctor about this.  Solving the problem may be as simple as switching medications.

MYTH #7: They make you gain weight

TRUTH:  Some antidepressants cause a change in appetite in some people.  For instance, while nortriptyline (Elavil) and fluoxetine (Prozac) might increase it, bupropion (also known as Wellbutrin) often decreases it. Since one of the side of effects of moderate to severe cases of major depression is weight loss, this might not be a bad thing.  But as a rule, antidepressants don’t themselves pack on the weight.

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However, if you are already overweight or have a medical condition that would worsen with weight gain (such as diabetes, orthopedic problems or cardiac disease), my recommendation is always the same:  before you try an antidepressant, get into some kind of exercise program.  Get a personal trainer, swim at the Y, ride your bike, or take an exercise class, and see if you’re among the 30% whose depression can be alleviated through exercise.

Regular moderate exercise increases oxygenation to the brain, releases feel-good hormones, improves self-esteem, and helps us connect more with the outside world, all of which contribute to a better mood.  By all means, try this for a month and see if it doesn’t brighten your mood considerably!

MYTH #8: They make you feel numb

TRUTH:  Usually the opposite is true.  Sinking into clinical depression can be so painful, emotions may shut down all together, leaving the person feeling emotionally numb.  When the depression begins to lift (through whatever treatment), people often comment that they feel alive again, that they are experiencing color again, instead of everything looking and feeling grey.

It is true that in some people, antidepressants even out some of the highs and lows, and that evening-out can feel strange, perhaps even dull or numb, to someone used to the emotional roller coaster.

MYTH #9: Antidepressants work on all kinds of depression.

TRUTH:  Not even close.  For instance, depression that is caused by bipolar disorder (previously known as Manic-Depression) must be treated with an entirely different class of medication (such as mood stabilizers or antipsychotics) than those that are used to treat major depression.  Antidepressants can actually trigger psychotic episodes in those with bipolar disorder.

Depression due to a loss of some kind, such as divorce, death of a family member, loss of job, etc. is usually best treated with support groups or individual talk therapy, such as Human Needs Counseling or Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.  If after supportive counseling the person still feels stuck in their emotional quicksand, a short course of antidepressant therapy can help get them unstuck and moving forward in their healing.

MYTH #10: Antidepressants are like antibiotics–they cure what’s wrong

TRUTH:  Depression is nothing like an infection, and antidepressants bear no resemblance to antibiotics.  This particular myth probably stems from our society’s penchant for taking something vs. doing something to resolve pretty much any discomfort.  Backaches are addressed with muscle relaxants instead of strengthening exercise and stretching.  Headaches are addressed with vasoconstrictors and anti-inflammatories instead of meditation and a non-allergenic diet.  We’ll throw medications at anything troubling, if we think they have a chance of making it quietly go away.

Depression is much more complex than most people realize.  There is a long list of stressors that can cause depression, and in most cases, it’s not one but several that are involved.  Maybe it starts out as feeling unattractive after a break up, but picks up steam when the person also has lost self-esteem because the relationship had been abusive.  And maybe, because of the abuse, the person now has terrible anxiety about trusting people and no longer believes in their own lovablility.  And all of that together causes so much pain, the person tries everything they can think of to relieve the pain… including behaviors that are actually far more destructive than they ever are helpful.

In my 30+ years of working with depressed and traumatized people, this complex storyline is the norm, not the exception.  Medication alone might be a good place to start, but it’s not going be enough to get this person safely to the other side of this crisis.  The person also needs education and coaching to have a good chance at fully recovering.

MYTH #11: Once you feel better, you can go off the medication

TRUTH:  Most doctors recommend staying on antidepressants for at least 6 months, to allow the brain to adapt to the higher level of sensitivity.  And as stated earlier, discontinuing antidepressants too soon can set you up for a recurrence of the symptoms.

Once you and your doctor have settled on the right antidepressant for you, and your symptoms have resolved, the general consensus is that patients should stay on an antidepressant for at least a year. That way, your brain has the chance of adapting and sort of “locking in” the changes, decreasing the chances of remission. If this is your first depressive episode, stopping treatment sooner than 6 months may increase your risk of your symptoms returning.  If it’s your second or third, most doctors recommend at least a full year.

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MYTH #12: The side effects are worse than the depression

TRUTH:  As someone who has herself suffered bouts of severe depression, I’d have to say that nothing is worse than depression.

But more to the point, it is true that antidepressants may cause uncomfortable side effects in some people.

For instance, in some cases antidepressants can briefly cause or intensify thoughts of suicide.  Antidepressants across the board often cause dreams to become quite vivid, sometimes even a bit “wild.”  I always found it more entertaining than disturbing, but it’s different for everyone.

Tricyclics (TCAs) side effects tend to be along the lines of dry mouth, dry nose, dry skin, blurred vision, urinary hesitancy, weight gain, drowsiness, and/or constipation.  Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) sometimes cause agitation, anxiety, irritability, jitteriness, confusion, headache, reduced sexual desire or ability to perform, insomnia, change in weight, diarrhea and/or nausea.

But it is also true that many people have few, or no, side effects while on them.  There’s no way to know ahead of time whether you might experience side effects or not, and if so, what exactly those might be.

MYTH #13: They’re all about the same.  So if one doesn’t work, none of them will.

TRUTH:  There are 29 separate antidepressant formulas on the market that fall into one of 7 different drug classes:

  • Aminoketones
  • Monoamine oxidase inhibitor
  • Norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor
  • Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor
  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor
  • Tricyclic antidepressant
  • Tetracyclic antidepressant

Each drug class works differently in the brain, and even drugs within the same drug class have chemical differences. For instance, citalopram (Celexa) and escitalopram (Lexapro) are both SSRIs and chemically very similar.  And yet, people react very differently to each of them.  Many patients have told me that they’ve tried both and found that one of them gives them great relief while the other hardly affected them at all.

There’s no way to predict how each individual’s brain will match up with any given antidepressant.

Featured photo credit: miszaqq via 123rf.com

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Last Updated on March 30, 2020

Why You’re Feeling Tired All the Time (And What to Do About It)

Why You’re Feeling Tired All the Time (And What to Do About It)

Feeling tired all the time?

Have you ever caught yourself nodding off when you’re watching TV, listening to someone drone on during a meeting or even driving a car?

I know I have, especially when I worked 70 hours per week as a High-Tech Executive.

Feeling tired all the time may be more widespread than you think. In fact, two-fifths of Americans are tired most of the week.[1]

If you’re tired of feeling tired, then I’ve got some great news for you. New research is helping us gain critical insights into the underlying causes of feeling tired all the time.

In this article, we’ll discuss the latest reasons why you’re feeling tired all the time and practical steps you can take to finally get to the bottom of your fatigue and feel rested.

What Happens When You’re Too Tired

If you sleep just two hours less than the normal eight hours, you could be as impaired as someone who has consumed up to three beers.[2] And you’ve probably experienced the impact yourself.

Here are some common examples of what happens when you’re feeling tired:[3]

  • You may have trouble focusing because memory and learning functions may be impaired within your brain.
  • You may experience mood swings and an inability to differentiate between what’s important and what’s not because your brain’s neurotransmitters are misfiring.
  • You may get dark circles under your eyes and/or your skin make look dull and lackluster in the short term and over time your skin may get wrinkles and show signs of aging because your body didn’t have time to remove toxins during sleep.
  • You may find it more difficult to exercise or to perform any type of athletic activity.
  • Your immune system may weaken causing you to pick up infections more easily.
  • You may overeat because not getting enough sleep activates the body’s endocannabinoids even when you’re not hungry.
  • Your metabolism slows down so what you eat is more likely to be stored as belly fat.

Are you saying that feeling tired can make me overweight?

Unfortunately, yes!

Feeling tired all the time can cause you to put on the pounds especially around your waist. But it is a classic chicken and egg situation, too.

Heavier people are more likely to feel fatigued during the day than lighter ones. And that’s even true for overweight people who don’t have sleep apnea (source: National Institutes of Health).

Speaking of sleep apnea, you may be wondering if that or something else is causing you to feel tired all the time.

Why Are you Feeling Tired All the Time?

Leading experts are starting to recognize that there are three primary reasons people feel tired on a regular basis: sleep deprivation, fatigue and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS).

Here’s a quick overview of each root cause of feeling tired all of the time:

  1. Tiredness occurs from sleep deprivation when you don’t get high-quality sleep consistently. It typically can be solved by changing your routine and getting enough deep restorative sleep.
  2. Fatigue occurs from prolonged sleeplessness which could be triggered by numerous issues such as mental health issues, long-term illness, fibromyalgia, obesity, sleep apnea or stress. It typically can be improved by changing your lifestyle and using sleep aids or treatments, if recommended by your physician.
  3. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a medical condition also known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis that occurs from persistent exhaustion that doesn’t go away with sleep.

The exact cause of CFS is not known, but it may be due to problems with the immune system, a bacterial infection, a hormone imbalance or emotional trauma.

It typically involves working with a doctor to rule out other illnesses before diagnosing and treating CFS.[4]

Always consult a physician to get a personal diagnosis about why you are feeling tired, especially if it is a severe condition.

Feeling Tired vs Being Fatigued

If lack of quality sleep doesn’t seem to be the root cause for you, then it’s time to explore fatigue as the reason you are frequently feeling tired.

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Until recently, tiredness and fatigue were thought to be interchangeable. Leading experts now realize that tiredness and fatigue are different.

Tiredness is primarily about lack of sleep.

But fatigue is a perceived feeling of being tired that is much more likely to occur in people who have depression, anxiety or emotional stress and/or are overweight and physically inactive (source: Science Direct).

Symptoms of fatigue include:

  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Low stamina
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Anxiety
  • Low motivation

These symptoms may sound similar to those of tiredness but they usually last longer and are more intense.

Unfortunately, there is no definitive reason why fatigue occurs because it can be a symptom of an emotional or physical illness. But there are still a number of steps you can take to reduce difficult symptoms by making a few simple lifestyle changes.

How Much Sleep Is Enough?

The number one reason you may feel tired is because of sleep deprivation which means you are not getting enough high-quality sleep.

Most adults need 7 to 9 hours of high-quality, uninterrupted sleep per night. If you’re sleep deprived, the amount of sleep you need increases.

So, quantity and quality do matter when it comes to sleep.

The key to quality sleep is being able to get long, uninterrupted sleep cycles throughout the night. It typically takes 90 minutes for you to reach a state of deep REM sleep where your body’s healing crew goes to work.

Ideally, you want to get at least 3 to 4 deep REM sleep cycles in per night. That’s why it’s so important to stay asleep for 7 or more hours.

Research also shows that people who think they can get by on less sleep don’t perform as well as people who get at least seven hours of sleep a night[5] So, you should definitely plan on getting seven hours of deep restorative sleep every night.

If you are not getting 7 hours of high-quality sleep regularly, then sleep deprivation is most likely reason you feel tired all the time.

And that is good news because sleep deprivation is much simpler and easier to address than the other root causes.

It’s also a good idea to rule out sleep deprivation as the reason why you are tired before moving on to the other possibilities such as fatigue or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, which may require a doctor for diagnosis and treatment.

4 Simple Changes to Reduce Fatigue

Personally, I’m a big believer in upgrading your lifestyle to uplift your life. I overcame chronic stress and exhaustion by making these four changes to my lifestyle:

  1. Eating healthy, home-cooked meals versus microwaving processed foods or eating out
  2. Exercising regularly
  3. Using stressbusters
  4. Creating a bedtime routine to sleep better

So, I know it is possible to change your lifestyle even when you’re working crazy hours and have lots of family responsibilities.

After I made the 4 simple changes in my lifestyle, I no longer felt exhausted all of the time.

In addition, I lost two inches off my waist and looked and felt better than ever.

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I was so excited that I wanted to help others replace stress and exhaustion with rest and well-being, too. That’s why I became a Certified Holistic Wellness Coach through the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute.

Interestingly enough, I discovered that Dr. Sears recommends a somewhat similar L.E.A.N. lifestyle:

  • L is for Lifestyle and means living healthy including getting enough sleep.
  • E is for Exercise and means getting at least 20 minutes of exercise a day ideally for six days a week.
  • A is for Attitude and means thinking positive and reducing stress whenever possible.
  • N is for Nutrition and means emphasizing a right-fat diet, not a low-fat diet.

The L.E.A.N. lifestyle is a scientifically-proven way to reduce fatigue, get to the optimal weight and to achieve overall wellness.[6]

And yes, there does seem to be an important correlation between being lean and feeling rested.

But overall based on my personal experience and Dr. Sear’s scientific proof, the key to not feeling tired all of the time does seem to be 4 simple changes to your lifestyle.

L — Living Healthy

Getting enough high-quality sleep every day is the surefire way to help you feel less fatigued, more rested and better overall.

So, whether you’re sleep deprived or potentially suffering from fatigue or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, you probably want to find a way to sleep better.

In fact, if you aren’t getting enough sleep, your body isn’t getting the time it needs to repair itself; meaning that if you are suffering from an illness, it’s far more likely to linger.

As unlikely as it sounds, though, fatigue can sometimes make it difficult to sleep. That’s why I’d recommend taking a look at your bedtime routine before you go to bed and optimize it based on sleep best practices.

Here are 3 quick and easy tips for creating a pro-sleep bedtime routine:

1. Unplug

Many of us try to unwind by watching TV or doing something on an iPhone or tablet. But tech can affect your melatonin production due to the blue light that they emit, fooling your body into thinking it’s still daytime.

So turn off all tech one hour before bed and create a tech-free zone in your bedroom.

2. Unwind

Do something to relax.

Use the time before bed to do something you find relaxing such as reading a book, listening to soothing music, meditating or taking an Epsom salt bath.

3. Get Comfortable

Ensure your bed is comfortable and your room is set up for sleep.

Make sure you room is cool. 60-68 degrees is the ideal temperature for most people to sleep.

Also, it’s ideal if your bedroom is dark and there is no noise.

Finally, make sure everything is handled (e.g., laying out tomorrow’s clothes) before you get into your nice, comfy bed.

If your mind is still active, write a to-do list to help you fall asleep faster.[7]

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Above all, be gentle with yourself and count your blessings, some sheep or whatever helps.

This article also offers practical tips to build a bedtime routine: How to Build a Good Bedtime Routine That Makes Your Morning Easier

E — Exercise

Many people know that exercise is good for them, but just can’t figure out how to fit it into their busy schedules.

That’s what happened in my case.

But when my chronic stress and exhaustion turned into systemic inflammation (which can lead to major diseases like Alzheimer’s), I realized it was time to change my lifestyle.

As part of my lifestyle upgrade, I knew I needed to move more.

My friends who exercise all gave me the same advice: find an exercise you like to do and find a specific time in your schedule when you can consistently do it.

That made sense to me.

So, I decided to swim.

I used to love to swim when I was young, but I hadn’t done it for years. The best time for me to do it was immediately after work, since I could easily get an open swim lane at my local fitness club then.

Also, swimming became a nice reason for me to leave work on time. And I got to enjoy a nice workout before eating dinner.

Swimming is a good way to get your cardio or endurance training. But, walking, running and dancing are nice alternatives.

So find an exercise you love and stick to it. Ideally, get a combination of endurance training, strength training and flexibility training in during your daily 20-minute workout.

If you haven’t exercised in a while and have a lot of stress in your life, you may want to give yoga a try because you will increase your flexibility and lower your stress.

A — Attitude

Stress may be a major reason why you aren’t feeling well all of the time. At least that was the case with me.

When I worked 70 hours per week as a High-Tech Executive, I felt chronically stressed and exhausted. But there was one thing that always worked to help me feel calmer and less fatigued.

Do you want to know what that master stress-busting technique was?

Breathing.

But not just any old breathing. It was a special form of deep Yogic breathing called the “Long-Exhale Breathing” or “4-7-8 breathing” or “Pranayama” in Sanskrit).

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Here’s how you do “Long-Exhale Breathing”:

  1. Sit in a comfortable position with your spine straight and your hand on your tummy (so you know you are breathing deeply from your diaphragm and not shallowly from your chest)
  2. Breathe in deeply and slowly from your diaphragm with your mouth closed while you count to 4 (ideally until your stomach feels full of air)
  3. Hold your breath while you count to 7 mentally and enjoy the stillness
  4. Breathe out through your mouth with a “ha” sound while you count to 8 (or until your stomach has no more air in it)
  5. Pause after you finish your exhale while you notice the sense of wholeness and relaxation from completing one conscious, deep, long exhale breath
  6. Repeat 3 times ensuring your exhale is longer than your inhale so you relax your nervous system

This type of “long-exhale breathing” is scientifically proven to reduce stress.

When your exhale is twice as long as your inhale, it soothes your parasympathetic nervous system, which regulates the relaxation response.[8]

Plus, this is a great technique for helping you get to sleep, too.

N — Nutrition

Diet is vital for beating fatigue – after all, food is your main source of energy.

If your diet is poor, then it implies you’re not getting the nutrients you need to sustain healthy energy levels.

Eating a diet for fatigue doesn’t need to be complicated, time-consuming though.

For most people, it’s just a case of swapping a few unhealthy foods for a few healthier ones, like switching from low-fiber, processed foods to whole, high-fiber foods.

Unless your current diet is solely made up of fast food and ready meals, adjusting to a fatigue-fighting diet shouldn’t be too much of a shock to the system.

Here’re 9 simple diet swaps you can make today:

  1. Replace your morning coffee with Matcha green tea and drink only herbal tea within six hours of bedtime.
  2. Add a healthy fat or protein to your any carb you eat, especially if you eat before bed. Please note that carb-only snacks lead to blood-sugar crashes that can make you eat more and they can keep you from sleeping.
  3. Fill up with fiber especially green leafy vegetables. Strive to get at least 25g per day with at least 5 servings (a serving is the size of your fist) of green vegetables.
  4. Replace refined, processed, low-fiber pastas and grains with zucchini noodles and whole grains such as buckwheat, quinoa, sorghum, oats, amaranth, millet, teff, brown rice and corn.
  5. Swap natural sweeteners for refined sugars and try to ensure you don’t get more than 25g of sugar a day if you are a woman and 30g of sugar a day if you are a man.
  6. Replace ice cream with low-sugar alternatives such as So Delicious Dairy-Free Vanilla Bean Coconut Ice Cream.
  7. Swap omega-6, partially-hydrogenated oils such as corn, palm, sunflower, safflower, cotton, canola and soybean oil for omega-3 oils such as flax, olive and nut oils.
  8. Replace high-sugar yoghurts with low-sugar, dairy-free yoghurts such as Kite Hill Plain Yoghurt with 1g sugar or Lifeway Farmer Cheese with 0g sugar.
  9. Swap your sugar-laden soda for sparkling water with a splash of low-sugar juice

Also, ensure your diet is giving you enough of the daily essential vitamins and minerals. Most of us don’t get enough Vitamin D, Vitamin B-12, Calcium, Iron and Magnesium. If you are low on any of the above vitamins and minerals, you may experience fatigue and low energy.

That’s why it’s always worth having your doctor check your levels. If you find any of them are low, then try to eat foods rich in them.

Alternatively, you might consider a high-quality multi-vitamin or specific supplement.

The Bottom Line

If you are tired of feeling tired, then there is tremendous hope.

If you are tired because you are not getting enough high-quality sleep, then the best remedy is a bedtime routine based on sleep best practices.

If you are tired because you have stress and fatigue, then the best remedy are four simple lifestyle changes including:

  • Enough High-Quality Sleep with Bedtime Routine
  • Regular Exercise You Love
  • Stress Reduction with Long-Exhale Breathing
  • Fatigue-Reducing Diet

Overall, adopting a healthier lifestyle Is the ideal remedy for feeling more rested and energized.

More Tips to Help You Rest Better

Featured photo credit: Cris Saur via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] YouGov: Two-fifths of Americans are tired most of the week
[2] National Safety Council: Is Your Company Confronting Workplace Fatigue?
[3] The New York Times: Why Are We So Freaking Tired?
[4] Mayo Clinic: Chronic fatigue syndrome
[5] Mayo Clinic: Lack of sleep: Can it make you sick?
[6] Ask Dr. Sears: The L.E.A.N. Lifestyle
[7] American Psychological Association: Getting a Good Night’s Sleep
[8] Yoga International: Learning to Exhale: 2-to-1 Breathing

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