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3 Brain Hacks For Becoming An Eloquent Public Speaker

3 Brain Hacks For Becoming An Eloquent Public Speaker

No matter what industry we work in, we can all benefit from being more eloquent public speakers. It’s important to always look to improve our communication and interpersonal skills. Whether it’s giving a speech to an auditorium of thousands or simply addressing a few dozen co-workers, the basic principle is the same: when addressing multiple people at once, getting our message across accurately and memorably is vital to success.

There’s a word that does a great job of summing up public speaking: eloquence. Merriam-Webster defines eloquence as: “the ability to speak or write well and in an effective way.” It goes on to say: “[eloquence is] discourse marked by force and persuasiveness; also: the art or power of using such discourse.”

How can you improve your public speaking skills and become an eloquent speaker? Thankfully, there are plenty of brain hacks to help you master the art. Let’s look at five of these:

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1. Learn (And Use) A New Word Each Day

Our first brain hack is deceptively simple: learn, and then use, a new word each day. Though it’s easy to imagine yourself succeeding at this seemingly simple task, it does take a bit of effort.

For one, you may rarely be in a social situation that facilitates the use of the word esurient. Also, it’s often a struggle to remember what you had for breakfast in the morning, so remembering to use a word you just learned can be tricky.

Stick with it and keep making the effort, however, and you’ll soon find yourself enjoying the daily challenge. It will pay off in dividends when you find yourself in a public speaking situation and must find the right words to use on the fly.

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2. Train Yourself To Speak Without Preparation

Public speaking doesn’t have to involve writing a speech. In many instances, there’s no time to prepare. Even when you have plenty of time beforehand, it’s important not to over-plan your speech. Audiences don’t want to be read to — they want to be engaged with. It’s important to view public speaking more as a conversation and less as a poetry reading.

Martha Ebeling, a debate expert, wrote up a list of Ten Commandments for extemporaneous speaking. The most pertinent of the ten are the first two: exude confidence and relax. It’s good advice.

Getting nervous is the biggest hurdle in becoming a truly eloquent speaker. To get there, you must have confidence in yourself, confidence in your knowledge, and most importantly you must learn to relax and be comfortable with your situation. A great brain hack for doing this is to use positive self-talk.

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3. Keep It Simple, Stupid

This principle, known affectionately as KISS, is commonly taught to anyone working in a communication-heavy field. Writers, salespeople, and public speakers swear by it, and for good reason.

Simple speech makes a bigger impression in the listener’s mind. While it’s tempting to assume flowery language is the key to eloquent speaking, all too often it is the opposite case: superfluous adjectives amidst prose only serve to distract from your point, and the only impression you’ll leave with your audience is that you’re a bit of a windbag.

That’s not to say flowery language can’t enhance your speech — it absolutely can. This is the difference between effective public speaking and truly eloquent public speaking. It exists to add an enchanting sophistication to your speech, and should be surprising, memorable, and most of all infrequent.

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So, what’s the brain hack here? It’s the simple knowledge that you don’t have to overdo it. Worrying about every word in every sentence adds an unnecessary layer of stress to your thought process, and your ability as a speaker will suffer for it. Therefore, be free of this burden. Speak simply, and let your flourishes come naturally.

Featured photo credit: Gratisography via gratisography.com

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

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“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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