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5 Easy Steps to Broadcast Your Event on the Internet

5 Easy Steps to Broadcast Your Event on the Internet

Live streaming is a great way for anyone to allow off-site guests to attend any event. When you stream your event live on the internet, you allow anyone to participate in your event from anywhere in the world as long as they have an internet connection. It’s a great way to expand your audience at live events, get noticed or even let far-away friends and family participate in your big day.

There are a lot of great apps that you can use to broadcast depending on the device you own or your goals. One of the easiest ways to use live streaming is with YouTube. YouTube is free, offers simple options and advanced settings and has a highly rated video service that you can rely on. It also works on almost every internet-enabled device from computers to tablets to phones. You just need the free apps or website installed on your device and a great internet connection.

On-Air: How to Broadcast Your Event

Broadcasting your event live is a straightforward process and requires only five simple steps:

1. Set up your service

To use YouTube, you need to verify your account and ensure that your account is in good standing. You can verify your account by adding a phone number and using phone verification. To check if you’re in good standing, navigate to the ‘Status and Features’ section of your account. As long as you have violated community rules or committed copyright infringement, you’ll be good to go.

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If you’re using the fast option, you will then link your Google+ profile to a YouTube channel. If you don’t have a Google+ profile, it only takes a few minutes to set up.

The last preliminary step is to make sure your channel is enabled for live events. You can enable by navigating back to the ‘Status and Features’ section of your account.

2. Prepare your event

Once your channel is ready, it is time to set up your event. Start by navigating to the ‘Live Events’ section of your Video Manager. Once there, click on ‘Create live event.’

You need to fill in some basic information about your event. You’ll need:

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  • Title
  • Description
  • Key word tags
  • Date
  • Start and end times

You’ll also need to decide how secure you want the event to be. You can create an even that is entirely open to the public. Alternatively, you can choose the private setting which requires you to invite guests to the event.

Another option allows you to create a public event that is ‘unlisted’ so that you don’t have to invite guests but the event also won’t be promoted. This is a great option in the event that you want to keep things private but don’t want to enter a lot of names or email addresses into the system.

3. Customize your stream

One of the great things about the YouTube platform is that you can configure your event to match your requirements. In ‘Advanced Settings’ you can add a live chat feed and manage your recording preferences.

You should also use these settings to find the best category for your event to fall in, particularly if it’s a public event. The better you are able to describe the event, the easier it will be for people to find you.

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You can also embed the URL of the event into your own website. This provides another way for viewers to join in.

4. Test the event

Before the big day, you will want to test your event. Get started by choosing ‘Start Hangout on Air.’ From here, you’ll download the plugins and enable the settings required for a successful stream.

Once this happens, your webcam will launch. Use the demo to test your equipment, including your camera and microphone, which is typically apart of your web cam. Check out how well your YouTube stream functions and play around with where your web cam and mic will be placed during the event.

This is also a good time to test your internet speed. Your live stream won’t function properly if you don’t have the bandwidth to support it and this should be considered before the event goes live.

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You might not realize it, but if you plan to broadcast wirelessly, you will incur a much heavier load on your network than you would using your phone to stream regular content over WiFi. If you are receiving week broadcast signals, try to set up your equipment using a signal booster system design for optimal broadcast quality.

5. Stream

When you’re ready to go, open the event and press the green button that says ‘Start broadcast.’ The event will then record and everyone watching can see and hear you straight from your YouTube channel. When you’re done, simply press the ‘Stop broadcast’ button.

One of the things people like most about using YouTube is that the event is recorded. It then goes on your YouTube channel for you to review. You can then edit it and share it with anyone who couldn’t attend. You can also make it public or private and post it on your channel for your followers to see.

Whether you’re building a brand or including a faraway friend in a birthday celebration, live streaming is a simple and fun way to share what’s happening in your life with the world.

Featured photo credit: wetribe via flickr.com

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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