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13 Free Online Job Boards for Freelance Writers

13 Free Online Job Boards for Freelance Writers

Freelance writing sounds like a dream job to so many people; working from home in their PJs, or sipping on lattes as they type away in a cute cafe downtown—what’s not to love?

But the truth is, becoming a successful freelance writer takes a lot of work and dedication. There’s more to it than what we see on shows like Sex and the City. There’s bookkeeping, keeping track of invoices, coming up with new story ideas, constant communication with editors, and even interviewing sources, but the hardest part is often finding work.

A lot of new freelance writers have no idea where to look for paying gigs, or gigs that pay more than pennies. So many beginner freelance writers end up writing for content mills where they literally get paid less a cent a word. For example, a few years ago I found myself trying out a content mill. After writing two 500 word stories, I made a whopping $0.75, which I couldn’t even withdraw from my account until I reached $5. It’s still sitting there years later.

If you want to get into freelance writing, but aren’t sure where to look, here’s a list of job boards.

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1. Freelance Writing Gigs

Freelance Writing Gigs list a variety of different gigs in a daily blog post from Monday to Friday. Jobs they list include copywriting, content writing, blogging, journalism, editing and more. It’s more of a roundup post of the best writing gigs from around the web, all conveniently posted in one place and is the perfect site to find freelance writing jobs.

2. ProBlogger Job Board

The ProBlogger job board is the perfect place for beginner freelance writers. This is where I found my first two gigs, gigs I still have to this day because they pay well and are very professional. ProBlogger is an amazing resource for bloggers to learn all about the business side of it. Darren Rowse, creator of ProBlogger, is legit and so are the job postings found here.

3. All Indie Writers

One thing I really like about this job board is that the job listings have their pay rates right there before you click on the actual job listing. They’re even categorized between low pay and pro-rate! Some of the pro-rate jobs even go up into $1000 or more. The job listings here are also quite varied and even include poetry submissions.

4. Writing Career

Writing Career is very different from the other sites listed here because it includes call for submissions for poetry, short stories, novels and more, so if you’re into creative writing rather than reporting or non-fiction, this is a great site. They still display job postings for non-fiction, too, but instead of ongoing work it’s usually for magazine articles.

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5. Freelance Writing Jobs

This is a Canadian site and most, if not all jobs, are based in Canada. They list new job postings almost daily, making it a great site to visit each morning. They, too, list a variety of different writing styles and projects.

6. Blogger Jobs

This job board is nice because they list not only freelance jobs, but also internships, full-time writing jobs and more, so be sure to check off the option that you want when looking for work. Some of the jobs are for a specific location where you will have to go into their office, which only works if you’re local to them. They also share a daily blog post with recent gigs and job openings.

7. Journalism Jobs

I feel like this website is more for professional journalists. They post jobs for newspapers, PR firms, publishing houses and things like that. Still, it’s a good site to check out if you are looking for a professional writing job.

8. Who Pays Writers

This site doesn’t really post about reoccurring gigs, but it does share websites and magazines that pay for submissions, and even shares how much they pay! This is a great site to look into if you want to get into feature writing, especially for magazines.

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8. LinkedIn Jobs

You can find jobs on LinkedIn’s job board, which is great because it shows jobs that are local to you. LinkedIn is a great tool for networking and every freelancer should have an account with them. LinkedIn makes it easy to display your talents, experience and portfolio. Obviously this is perfect for when you want to reach out to people or apply for jobs.

9. MediaBistro

This site is great for looking for a job. You can search by industry, location, duration and company. If you’re mostly just interested in freelance writing, look under duration.

10. Morning Coffee Newsletter

This is a newsletter that gets sent out weekly with a list of current gigs and job openings. Signing up makes it easy because instead of searching the job boards, you can simply get a list of available writing gigs right in your inbox. However, if you prefer to search their job board instead of receiving their newsletter, the jobs they share are often listed on their website, too.

11. BloggingPro Job Board

BloggingPro has a job board that lists a variety of writing jobs and gigs. They, too, make it easy for you to search your specific style or niche.

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12. Craigslist

Craigslist gets a pretty bad reputation, but when it comes to freelance writing gigs it’s an excellent place to start. Since anyone can post to Craigslist for free, and it is not filtered like these other job boards, it’s important to do your research before accepting any work.

Featured photo credit: picjumbo via picjumbo.com

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Published on January 28, 2020

How to Ace an Interview: Nailing the 10 Most Tricky Questions

How to Ace an Interview: Nailing the 10 Most Tricky Questions

As someone who has been in recruiting for over 10 years I can tell you the interview is vitally important to getting that new job you really want. During the interview process, there will most likely be at least 2 interviews, a phone interview and an in person interview. Both are important.

Companies can of course have different interviewing processes but in general, there is at least one phone interview, also known as a phone screen, and a live, in-person interview. The in-person interview can be with one person or it might be with a variety of people. While they are both important, the live interview is typically the one that will make or break you as a candidate for the position you are interviewing for.

Many of the interview questions we will review here will more likely come up during the live interview. But it’s a good idea to be prepared for them on the phone interview as well.

To illustrate how important the live interview is, I’ll tell you about my search that happened a year ago. I’d decided it was time to move on from the role I’d been in for a little over 6 years. As I started researching and looking for a new opportunity, I began down the path with 2 companies. With the one I landed with, I’d had 3 separate phone screens, each one an hour long. They must have thought they went well because I was asked to fly to the city where the corporate office is at and do an in-person interview. — with 8 people.

Yeah, it was a long day. The good news is I rocked the interviews across the board. I flew home that evening and the following day, I received a call with the job offer. That was less than 24 hours after I’d had the in person interview. This is how important the live interview is.

So how to ace an interview? We can dive right in to helping you nail the 10 most tricky interview questions:

1. What’s Your Biggest Weakness?

This is a personal favorite of mine. The primary reason for this question is not to actually find out what your biggest weakness is. Unless of course, you say something like “showing up to work on a regular basis,” then it’s probably going to get you kicked out of consideration for the role.

The main reason for someone asking you this question is to see if you are self-aware. That is if you know your weaknesses and are smart enough to account for them.

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The smart play here is to answer in a modest way. You want to be able to show that your biggest weakness actually has an upside. For instance, I usually say that mine is impatience. Which is true, I like to get things done. But what I ensure what I point out is that even though I am impatient, it’s because I like to crank and get a lot of work done.

2. Why Do You Want to Work Here?

Interestingly enough, a lot of people don’t have an answer to this question. It’s designed to find out if you’ve actually done research on the company and if you are excited about this position.

When I ask this question, many people have told me something like “because it looks like a good opportunity”. I mean, can you be any more generic?

The key to answering this is to show you’ve done research on the company and that you are enthusiastic about the actual position. Companies want people that are excited to work there, not just someone that shows up for a paycheck.

3. Where Do You See Yourself in 5 Years?

Employers are asking you this question to see if you have somewhat of a plan for your career. It doesn’t have to be completely mapped out in a step by step manner but, a general overall plan is good to see. It means you are goal oriented and are working towards something.

Don’t worry about answering in a way that states you are planning on sticking with the company until you retire. Rather, focus more on how it’s important to you to continue to learn and get better and better at what you do. Companies like to hire self-motivated people.

4. Tell Me About a Time You Messed Up

Or tell me about a time something didn’t work out the way you planned. Similar in concept. The key here is to show that you take accountability for your actions and how you react to things going wrong.

Companies like to see that you are willing to accept responsibility for the things you oversee and own up when you are wrong. People that always find a way to blame their missteps on other people or circumstances typically don’t make good team mates.

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The other component here is things don’t always go as planned, how good are you at adapting and thinking on your feet.

5. Why Are You Looking to Leave Your Current Job?

This may seem like a place to launch into all the things you don’t like about your current job. Or to talk about what a terrible person your boss is. Don’t do it. That’s the path you do not want to go down. And that’s really what this question tends to prod out of many people.

If I am interviewing you and ask this question and you tell me all the ways your boss doesn’t appreciate you and your company has terrible leadership, I’m thinking what you’re going to be saying about me in a year when you are interviewing somewhere else.

Make sure you are framing your answer in a way that doesn’t shed bad light on your current or most recent employer. You want to focus on things like you’ve enjoyed working for the company but your growth options are limited there so you are exploring outside opportunities.

6. How Would Your Current Manager Describe You?

This question gives you the opportunity to show off your strengths and what your boss appreciates about what you bring to the table. You want to focus on the positive traits that your boss likes and how it helps you in your role.

What you do not want to do is sprinkle in the things your boss doesn’t think as highly of. Don’t say something like my boss would describe me as a focused worker, at least on the days I make it into the office.

7. Tell Me About a Time You Overcame an Obstacle

Another one of my favorite questions. Interviewers ask this question to see if you are able to deal with roadblocks.

Things don’t always go smoothly, so having people on the team who are able to solve problems has huge upside.

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Being able to overcome obstacles is a great trait to have. Make sure you have a few stories about how something didn’t go as planned that caused a challenge and how you were involved in solving the problem. It’s a way of turning a bad situation into a good one.

8. Why Should We Hire You?

If you are at the point of a live interview, you should be highly interested in the position.

By this point, you should have a pretty clear picture of what the role is and how your skills and experience will help you succeed. The reason this question is being asked is to see if you are the right candidate for this role.

This gives you a great opportunity to tell your interviewer how your expertise will positively impact the role. Right now, you are in the spotlight to clearly show that your experience is the perfect fit for the position and why. Shine on!

9. What’s Your Greatest Achievement?

Employers tend to ask this question to gain an understanding of what your big wins were. What are the really impactful things that have happened during your career and how you were the reason why they happened.

This is another great opportunity for you to toot your own horn. What you want to be conscious of is how you tell the story about your biggest achievement. You want to make sure you say why it was such a big achievement.

If possible, it’s always good to include your team as part of the big win. Employers love to hire people who can make things happen but, it’s also important they understand the importance of team work.

10. Do You Have Any Questions for Me?

You might be asking yourself why this is a tricky question. Honestly, it’s not a tricky question if you are prepared for it.

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What the interviewer is looking for here is how interested and excited you are for the position. You’d be surprised at how many people answer this question with a blank stare or have no questions prepared.

Again, if you are at a live interview, you should be highly interested in a position and the company. You will convey how interested you are in the opportunity with some well thought out questions to ask.

You don’t want to just ask one question like “How often is payday”? Have at least 4 to 5 questions prepared but don’t overwhelm your interviewer with dozens and dozens of questions. Show that you’ve given some serious thought to this position by coming prepared with solid questions to ask.

The Bottom Line

There you go, insight to nailing the 10 most tricky questions during the interview process. There are, of course, many other questions you might get asked during the interview process but, these tend to be the ones that trip most people up.

Remember to take your time and thoroughly prepare for the interview. You don’t have to memorize your answers or anything but having a good idea of how you’d answer these questions will help you ace the next interview.

Here’s to being career advancement ready!

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Featured photo credit: Romain V via unsplash.com

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