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13 Free Online Job Boards for Freelance Writers

13 Free Online Job Boards for Freelance Writers

Freelance writing sounds like a dream job to so many people; working from home in their PJs, or sipping on lattes as they type away in a cute cafe downtown—what’s not to love?

But the truth is, becoming a successful freelance writer takes a lot of work and dedication. There’s more to it than what we see on shows like Sex and the City. There’s bookkeeping, keeping track of invoices, coming up with new story ideas, constant communication with editors, and even interviewing sources, but the hardest part is often finding work.

A lot of new freelance writers have no idea where to look for paying gigs, or gigs that pay more than pennies. So many beginner freelance writers end up writing for content mills where they literally get paid less a cent a word. For example, a few years ago I found myself trying out a content mill. After writing two 500 word stories, I made a whopping $0.75, which I couldn’t even withdraw from my account until I reached $5. It’s still sitting there years later.

If you want to get into freelance writing, but aren’t sure where to look, here’s a list of job boards.

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1. Freelance Writing Gigs

Freelance Writing Gigs list a variety of different gigs in a daily blog post from Monday to Friday. Jobs they list include copywriting, content writing, blogging, journalism, editing and more. It’s more of a roundup post of the best writing gigs from around the web, all conveniently posted in one place and is the perfect site to find freelance writing jobs.

2. ProBlogger Job Board

The ProBlogger job board is the perfect place for beginner freelance writers. This is where I found my first two gigs, gigs I still have to this day because they pay well and are very professional. ProBlogger is an amazing resource for bloggers to learn all about the business side of it. Darren Rowse, creator of ProBlogger, is legit and so are the job postings found here.

3. All Indie Writers

One thing I really like about this job board is that the job listings have their pay rates right there before you click on the actual job listing. They’re even categorized between low pay and pro-rate! Some of the pro-rate jobs even go up into $1000 or more. The job listings here are also quite varied and even include poetry submissions.

4. Writing Career

Writing Career is very different from the other sites listed here because it includes call for submissions for poetry, short stories, novels and more, so if you’re into creative writing rather than reporting or non-fiction, this is a great site. They still display job postings for non-fiction, too, but instead of ongoing work it’s usually for magazine articles.

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5. Freelance Writing Jobs

This is a Canadian site and most, if not all jobs, are based in Canada. They list new job postings almost daily, making it a great site to visit each morning. They, too, list a variety of different writing styles and projects.

6. Blogger Jobs

This job board is nice because they list not only freelance jobs, but also internships, full-time writing jobs and more, so be sure to check off the option that you want when looking for work. Some of the jobs are for a specific location where you will have to go into their office, which only works if you’re local to them. They also share a daily blog post with recent gigs and job openings.

7. Journalism Jobs

I feel like this website is more for professional journalists. They post jobs for newspapers, PR firms, publishing houses and things like that. Still, it’s a good site to check out if you are looking for a professional writing job.

8. Who Pays Writers

This site doesn’t really post about reoccurring gigs, but it does share websites and magazines that pay for submissions, and even shares how much they pay! This is a great site to look into if you want to get into feature writing, especially for magazines.

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8. LinkedIn Jobs

You can find jobs on LinkedIn’s job board, which is great because it shows jobs that are local to you. LinkedIn is a great tool for networking and every freelancer should have an account with them. LinkedIn makes it easy to display your talents, experience and portfolio. Obviously this is perfect for when you want to reach out to people or apply for jobs.

9. MediaBistro

This site is great for looking for a job. You can search by industry, location, duration and company. If you’re mostly just interested in freelance writing, look under duration.

10. Morning Coffee Newsletter

This is a newsletter that gets sent out weekly with a list of current gigs and job openings. Signing up makes it easy because instead of searching the job boards, you can simply get a list of available writing gigs right in your inbox. However, if you prefer to search their job board instead of receiving their newsletter, the jobs they share are often listed on their website, too.

11. BloggingPro Job Board

BloggingPro has a job board that lists a variety of writing jobs and gigs. They, too, make it easy for you to search your specific style or niche.

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12. Craigslist

Craigslist gets a pretty bad reputation, but when it comes to freelance writing gigs it’s an excellent place to start. Since anyone can post to Craigslist for free, and it is not filtered like these other job boards, it’s important to do your research before accepting any work.

Featured photo credit: picjumbo via picjumbo.com

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Published on October 8, 2019

How to Advance Your Career (and the Big Mistakes You May be Making)

How to Advance Your Career (and the Big Mistakes You May be Making)

The late writer William S. Burroughs once said that “When you stop growing, you start dying.” It might have a morbid undertone, but it’s one hundred percent true in terms of one’s career.

The days of finding a job with one company that you can stick with for 30 years, and simply relax as you move up its company escalator are few and far between in today’s world. This isn’t necessarily bad news. On the contrary, it means that you’re the one in charge of shaping your career advancement.

By putting these principles and behaviors into practice, you’ll begin to see how to advance your career quickly. Ready? Let’s get started…

1. Define What Success Is for You

There’s no right or wrong definition of what success in your career looks like. The important thing is to figure out what success looks like for YOU. It might, and probably will, change along the way, but if you don’t have some sort of milestone on the horizon, then you won’t know which direction to go in.

Think about success in your career in terms of one year, five years, and 10 years. Once you have that, it’s time to lace up your boots and get to work.

2. Learn How to Develop and Follow a Plan

Nobody just stumbles upon success accidentally. Sure, they may stumble upon breakthroughs or new methods accidentally, but all success stories have one thing in common — a plan.

Establish a timeline for the things that you want to achieve in your career in the next year, five years, 10 years, and so on. Consider the skills that you’ll need to learn to make these things happen and work on acquiring them.

3. Surround Yourself With Those Better Than You

It’s a rule of thumb among musicians that if you want to get better, then you need to get out of the bedroom and play with people who are better than you.

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By surrounding yourself with people who are better than you and where you want to be, you’ll not only see how these people climbed to where they are in their respective fields, but you’ll learn from them and naturally want to push yourself to be better in your own job as well.

4. Seek Out a Mentor(s)

A mentor will not only be able to help you refine and reach your career goals, but will be invaluable in landing promotions and finding unadvertised job openings.

One unique approach is to work on fostering a relationship with a mentor both within and outside of your company. This will help in giving you different perspectives as you rise up through the ranks in your company and career overall.

5. Stop Wasting Your Mornings

You may not think you’re a morning person, but if you can learn to be one, you’ll thank yourself 10 years down the road.

Prepare a to-do list of tasks that you want to accomplish the day before and work on knocking them out for at least one hour before you respond to morning emails. The problem with responding to emails first, is you’re giving your attention to somebody else’s agenda, instead of plotting your own course for the day.

6. Arrange or Attend a Networking Party

If you’re attending networking events simply because you might get a few free drinks, you’re doing them wrong. These events are great for meeting new people and forming relationships. Your goal shouldn’t be to get hired by the end of the night, but to simply make a good impression by being friendly and authentic. So what’s next?

Reach out a few days later via email or on social media to follow up and connect!

7. Pick Up Some New Skills

Nobody wants to be the old dog that can’t learn any new tricks. To move up in your career, you’re going to likely need to pick up new skills along the way. Maybe your company offers on-the-job training or you have the option of taking online classes at night.

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By learning new skills, you’ll not only be able to expand upon what you can already do, but you’ll make yourself more valuable to your employer and future employers.

8. Exploit the Benefits Already at Your Disposal

Remember what we just said about the possibility of your company providing on-the-job training? Take advantage of these sorts of benefits!

If you’re working for a company that allows you to job shadow other employees or has company mixers, you should attend these. They not only allow you to develop your skills within the company, but show seasoned executives within your field that you’re interested in more than just clocking in for a paycheck.

9. Make Yourself Indispensable

Good help is hard to find and employers want to retain outstanding employees. If you can learn to make yourself indispensable to your company, you’ll not only communicate that you’re successful, but will have a lot more job security. What’s this entail though?

It’s actually not all that difficult. By being reliable, adapting to new challenges, and holding your own work and performance to a high standard, you’ll stand out among your peers and others will take notice. Easy enough, right?

10. Get Off the Fence

People who advance in their careers are those who don’t shy away from voicing their opinion and stand up with authority when the opportunity arises.

If a problem arises in your company and you think you might have a solution or are willing to work to find one, then let others know. Employers value and promote problem solvers. Start off with something small and work your way up towards tackling more difficult tasks and projects.

11. Don’t Wait for More Responsibility, Ask for It

If you want more responsibility in your job, then be open about it with your manager. Your manager may be so busy with their own work that they weren’t aware you were looking for more challenges.

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Just make sure you can handle it and that you already show strong performance in your current duties. And if your manager doesn’t seem supportive about offering you more responsibility, well, then it could be time to look for new employment.

12. Stop Wasting Time on What You Don’t Want

If your career goals start with “I should do this…” there could be a problem. This kind of language in referring to goals can doom them to failure because the want isn’t there.

Consider using the RUMBA method (Reasonable, Understandable, Measurable, Behavioral and Agreed) when setting your goals. That “agreed” part should really be “want.” By going after career goals that you actually want to accomplish, you’re much more likely to achieve them.

13. Seek Out Feedback and Apply It

Simply doing your job might not always push you up in your career advancement. Too often, employees just assume that their bosses will notice their performance strides and reach out when the time is right to advance.

Don’t be afraid to regularly seek out feedback and ask for constructive criticism. It not only shows that you value your manager’s opinion but demonstrates that you care about your job and want to become better in your chosen field.

14. Pick Your Bosses Wisely

Advancing in your career can move a lot quicker if you’re working for the right people. If your boss isn’t any good at their job or doesn’t value you, then moving up could become difficult.

A great boss though, will be able to help you capitalize on your strengths and be an advocate for your success. If there aren’t any strong developers of talent in your management chain already, then look around for some and seek them out as mentors.

15. Learn to Develop Your Sense of Timing

The odds of asking for a promotion or raise are in your favor with over 70 percent of respondents to a survey from PayScale reporting some success. One thing to keep in mind that can make all the difference is when you ask.

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Some corporate cultures may prefer that employees reach out about advancement during their annual review, but maybe you work for a more free-spirited startup. The best approach may be to take note of when others advance and ask about how the organization handles employee development.

16. Work Hard and Promote Yourself

Working hard and delivering a solid job performance are the keys to advancing in your career no matter what field you’re in. This doesn’t mean you need to be completely humble about your accomplishments either.

Keep a record of your positive impact within the organization and let others both within your company and your field know that you’re enthusiastic about your role and work.

17. Don’t Just Build Your Network… Cultivate It

It’s way too easy to add new people to your LinkedIn network and then forget about them for all eternity. Rather than just collecting business cards or social media contacts, you should be cultivating relationships with the ones you already have.

Follow up with people that you haven’t spoken to in a while, offer to connect them with somebody you know in their field, or ask about a new job title they may have taken on. Doing so could be the spark that leads to a potential job referral.

18. Join a Professional Organization

The National Association of (insert your industry here) and other professional organizations can still offer a great wealth of advantages from networking to industry insights, and skill development.

Even outside of professional organizations dedicated to particular job fields, civic organizations can also be fantastic for making new contacts. After all, so much about career advancement is who you know, and you never know who you’ll meet who knows somebody else who is looking for someone with your skills and experience.

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Featured photo credit: JESHOOTS.COM via unsplash.com

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