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5 Ways Being Both a Full-Time Student and Full-Time Worker Is Not As Bad As You Think

5 Ways Being Both a Full-Time Student and Full-Time Worker Is Not As Bad As You Think

Nowadays there is an abundance of pressure surrounding the professional development field. Everyone needs to know everything about anything, and jobs descriptions request both a professional degree and significant levels of experience. Sometimes, it seems that the only way to meet a job’s requirements is to be in two places at once for years at a time. I am currently living that situation; I am both a full-time student and a full-time worker. While it may sound like I have time for nothing else, that is not necessarily true. Sure sacrifices are made, but there are plenty of benefits of this professionally-centered version of “double-dipping.”

1. The things you learn in class translate directly to work.

I am currently a digital marketing communications coordinator and also enrolled in an Internet marketing class. Every Monday in class I stop the professor multiple times and ask questions that focus not just on the theory of how XYZ marketing campaign is supposed to be run, but that also focus closely on the tactical execution of the idea. This serves to help develop for me a natural buffer that keeps me a couple steps ahead of the demands of my work life.

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2. I know what I need to know for work and what I can easily discard.

At the end of the day, work clocks in as way more important than school–it is the way I can afford to eat and pay rent, after all. So when a professor starts getting into details about how to do a corporate financial audit, I know that I can just get the gist of what is being taught, because odds are I will never be put on the spot to do something similar at work. I work at a non-profit in digital communications–what are the odds I am the one called on to audit our books? Little to none.

3. One of my two dual roles will be over soon.

Schools run on semesters and don’t have class over the summer, right? So my role as a dual full-time student and full-time worker will end in early May, just in time for me to relax on Chicago’s beaches and go camping in New Hampshire. The fact that it won’t be like this forever makes it clear that, at least in one of my roles, the goal is to merely survive, because the payoff will be worth it in the form of lifetime earnings increasing by an average of 30% or so.

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4. I am doing this just for me.

Every once in a while, a young person like me will start fearing what musician Amanda Palmer calls “the adult police.” The adult police is her term for the imaginary parental figure or governmental authority that is responsible for ensuring everyone over a certain age is playing by a specific set of rules. Being both a full-time student and full-time worker makes it clear to me that there is no such thing as the adult police, because there is no way anyone who is trying to hold adults to certain standards would make me do what I am doing. The benefits of it accrue to me, and only to me.

5. Professors understand that work comes first.

At least in my particular MBA program, most of the professors are aware that we are there to learn practical skills which can be implement on a day-to-day basis. So that means no research papers that don’t focus on selling a product, and it means that they do as much as they can to entertain and engage us. It also means that the standards for grading are based on what can be slapped together at work or on a weekend while hungover. It means that if you do what they ask, you will get the grade.

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And that’s what I do every day, both as a full-time student and a full-time worker. Just get the grade and keep moving. It’s hard to hit a moving target, don’t ya know?

Featured photo credit: Seth Wilson via flickr.com

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Last Updated on August 20, 2018

Quit Your Job If You Don’t Like It, No Matter What

Quit Your Job If You Don’t Like It, No Matter What

Do you know that feeling? The one where you have to wake up to go to your boring 9-5 job to work with the same boring colleagues who don’t appreciate what you do.

I do, and that’s why I’ve decided to quit my job and follow my passion. This, however, requires a solid plan and some guts.

The one who perseveres doesn’t always win. Sometimes life has more to offer when you quit your current job. Yes, I know. It’s overwhelming and scary.

People who quit are often seen as ‘losers’. They say: “You should finish what you’ve started”.

I know like no other that quitting your job can be very stressful. A dozen questions come up when you’re thinking about quitting your job, most starting with: What if?

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“What if I don’t find a job I love and regret quitting my current job?”
“What if I can’t find another job and I get in debt because I can’t pay my bills?”
“What if my family and friends judge me and disapprove of the decisions I make?”
“What if I quit my job to pursue my dream, but I fail?

After all, if you admit to the truth of your surroundings, you’re forced to acknowledge that you’ve made a wrong decision by choosing your current job. But don’t forget that quitting certain things in life can be the path to your success!

One of my favorite quotes by Henry Ford:

If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve always got.

Everything takes energy

Everything you do in life takes energy. It takes energy to participate in your weekly activities. It takes energy to commute to work every day. It takes energy to organize your sister’s big wedding.

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Each of the responsibilities we have take a little bit of our energy. We only have a certain amount of energy a day, so we have to spend it wisely.  Same goes for our time. The only things we can’t buy in this world are time and energy. Yes, you could buy an energy drink, but will it feel the same as eight hours of sleep? Will it be as healthy?

The more stress there is in your life, the less focus you have. This will weaken your results.

Find something that is worth doing

Do you have to quit every time the going gets touch? Absolutely not! You should quit when you’ve put everything you’ve got into something, but don’t see a bright future in it.

When you do something you love and that has purpose in your life, you should push through and give everything you have.

I find star athletes very inspiring. They don’t quit till they step on that stage to receive their hard earned gold medal. From the start, they know how much work its going to take and what they have to sacrifice.

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When you do something you’re really passionate about, you’re not in a downward spiral. Before you even start you can already see the finish line. The more focus you have for something, the faster you’ll reach the finish.

It is definitely possible to spend your valuable time on something you love and earn money doing it. You just have to find out how — by doing enough research.

Other excuses I often hear are:

“But I have my wife and kids, who is going to pay the bills?”
“I don’t have time for that, I’m too busy with… stuff” (Like watching TV for 2 hours every day.)
“At least I get the same paycheck every month if I work for a boss.”
“Quitting my job is too much risk with this crisis.”

I understand those points. But if you’ve never tried it, you’ll never know how it could be. The fear of failure keeps people from stepping out of their comfort zone.

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I’ve heard many people say, “I work to let my children make their dream come true”. I think they should rephrase that sentence to: “I pursue my dreams — to inspire and show my children anything is possible.” 

Conclusion

Think carefully about what you spend your time on. Don’t waste it on things that don’t brighten your future. Instead, search for opportunities. And come up with a solid plan before you take any impulsive actions.

Only good things happen outside of your comfort zone.

Do you dare to quit your job for more success in life?

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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