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Choose Comfort for your Next Call Center Headset

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Choose Comfort for your Next Call Center Headset

If you are the manager heading a call center, you know you have options for what type of headsets to purchase. You have choices in features and technology. You can go wireless or corded. While these are important decisions to make, you shouldn’t forget one item when picking out headsets. You want the headsets to be comfortable to wear. If they aren’t comfortable, you will have many complaining employees. You also might face a lawsuit if the employees believe you are causing damage to their ears or head on a daily basis. What are the most comfortable headsets available? Read this list for more information.

1. Plantronics Voyager Pro 

The Voyager series has caught the eye of industry insiders for its comfort. The headsets use a single earpiece with Bluetooth technology. The type can be put into a call center or have at home. The problem is that the series is bulky even though the bulkiness is what adds the comfort to the wearer. It’s also more stable when it is sitting on the ear. These are great for situations where talking on the phone and to other people in the same room is important. Employees can change from conversing with customers or coworkers quite easily. Telemarketers, customer support technicians and others who are constantly on the phone will benefit from these.

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2. Novero Tour

If you want less bulkiness, you will want the tour. The design is slim and looks futuristic. You can buy a wired or wireless version. You can choose off-white or black. Like the Voyager, it uses just one earpiece, but the headset comes with a band that goes over the head and leads to the microphone. The Voyager doesn’t need the band.

3. Logitech Wireless Gaming Headset

While call centers don’t need gaming headsets, you might benefit from the technology. Because gaming headsets are not like Bluetooth headsets for office use, they need to be comfortable. They often use a double earpiece headset design and surround sound for the game sounds. Call centers or telemarketers probably would not need surround sound. When you use two ear pieces, you have to have a band that links them. Although they might be heavy and cause pain in long-term use, a well-fitted headset shouldn’t cause this problem. Logitech Wireless Gaming Headset G930 has a memory foam headband, giving players hours of comfort. Then, they can go sleep on the pillow or mattress with the same material. Call centers that use double headsets might want to use the memory foam for the bands.

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4. Bose Bluetooth Headset

Bose is known for its many Bluetooth headsets. Users rate them highly. If you choose these headsets, they will fit comfortably in the ear instead of over it or around it. The silicone tip contours to the wearer’s ear with little pressure. The headset can sit on the edge of a fingertip and is lightweight. The downside of this technology is that people might find it uncomfortable at first if they aren’t used to wearing earphones inside the ear. However, they adjust. It has the advantage of being used anywhere. Generally, people use them if they are on the go or in the car.

5. Microsoft LifeChat LX 3000

The Microsoft LifeChat LX-3000 is designed to use two ear pieces that are cushioned with ear cups and a noise cancelling microphone. Although Microsoft created the headset to go with its Windows Live messenger, you can use it for other functions.

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6. iMicro SP-IM942 Headset with Microphone

This iMicro headset has the added benefit that it’s not as expensive as some of the others. The company calls it an ultra affordable option. This the comfortable headset for people without a lot of money. However, you lose features. Still, people praise its quality.

7. Razer Carcharias Gaming Headset

Again, this is one that is for playing games not working in a call center. The Razer Carcharias Gaming Headset fits over-the-ear. The ear pieces don’t touch the ear. Besides the other features, this gaming headset also has a noise-reducing microphone that attempts to pick up only the user’s voice. You lose the background noise of the game or in a call center. Despite its comfort, it doesn’t come with many features.

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Featured photo credit: Call Center Environment via lifehack.org

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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