Advertising

Alert: How Sugary Drinks Harm Your Brain And Affect Your Mood

Advertising
Alert: How Sugary Drinks Harm Your Brain And Affect Your Mood

It’s refreshing to kick back, grab your favorite beverage and simply relax every once in a while. Summer is coming back around and you’ll be sure to see lemonades, iced teas, smoothies and other drinks galore. It’s often difficult to deny every opportunity you get to enjoy a cold, sweet beverage at the poolside, sports event or concert, especially when people say you’ll be happier after drinking something sweet, but is it true? A study finds something different.

How Rats React To Sugary Drinks

Sugar has been under the microscope hundreds of times before now, but it simply continues to receive flack for the lack of nourishment it provides. In fact, sugar often does damage above and beyond simply being void of beneficial micronutrients. Researchers Margaret Morris and Jayanthi Maniam studied female rats and their offspring for a case in which a group of rats was provided a drinkable solution containing a lot of sugar.

Advertising

For the experiment, half the rat litters were given normal nesting environments two to nine days after birth, and the other half were given limited nesting environments. This was to create one control set of rats through which to examine early-life stress. After this segment of the experiment was concluded, all rats were returned to regular, healthy nesting environments until they were fully weaned.

At this point, the rats were again split in half, with half receiving regular low-fat food and water. The other half were given food, water and a drinkable solution containing 25 percent sugar. All in all, there were four groups of rats studied. There were rats with a regular diet and weren’t subjected to stress, rats without stress and a diet with the sugar option, rats exposed to stress early on and rats with stress exposure and the sugar option. The rats were then re-examined once they were all about 15 weeks old.

Advertising

The Real Relationship between Stress And Sugar

To the researchers’ surprise, rats that were exposed to early-life stress but without the sugar option produced similar brain scans to the rats who were not stressed early on, but had the sugar option in their diet. Researchers Morris and Maniam placed a particular emphasis on the hippocampus, which is a primary region of the brain responsible for stress and memory.

What this started to mean for the research results is that consuming too many sugary beverages can create a stressful effect on your brain. As the study’s results were formulated, the researchers commented that consuming sugary beverages too early in life can affect an individual’s ability to recover well from a stressful situation.

Advertising

How Sugary Drinks Affect Brains And Nerves

Even more interestingly, Maniam and Morris found that a gene promoting the growth of nerves was down-regulated by both sugar and stress. This seems to suggest there are far more implications of sugar consumption than have yet been discovered. As mentioned earlier, sugar is often critiqued for its inability to provide substantial nutritional merit, but it seems there are discoveries yet to be made and applied. Mothers and fathers are wise to steer their children clear of sugar often, in order to help promote growth for the nerve-building gene mentioned in the study.

While the research was not considered “conclusive”, there’s no doubt it illustrated a powerful parallel between poor food choices and negative results. Too much of anything can result in unwanted effects. It is not to say all foods and drinks with sugar are always bad, but placing limits on how much you (or your children) consume is simply for the best. Plus, when you consume fewer desserts and treats in general, this means you’ll appreciate each one that much more!

Advertising

More by this author

Brad Johnson

Top 5 Kindle Author | Author of 10 Books

Science Says Delayed Gratification Leads to Success in Life entrepreneurs 12 Little Known Facts About Famous Entrepreneurs leaders 20 Timeless Characteristics Of Quality Leaders belly fat 9 Reasons Your Belly Fat Doesn’t Go Away And How To Get Rid Of It language Did You Know This Many People Speak This Language?

Trending in Health

1 How to Improve Digestion: 6 Ways For Stressful People 2 Why Am I So Sleepy And How to Stop Feeling Tired? 3 14 Habits That Will Increase Your Longevity 4 How To Stay Motivated For Making Healthy Lifestyle Changes 5 10 Simple Ways To Be More Active

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Advertising
5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

“Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

Food is a universal necessity.

It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

Advertising

Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

Advertising

The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

Advertising

Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

Advertising

So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

Advertising

Read Next