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What building a website taught me about myself

What building a website taught me about myself

I think you should setup your personal website or blog. Don’t do it for fame, money, or fortune. Do it for the journey, and for what you will learn about yourself in the process.

Let me share a few of the things I learned about myself by building a website.

I don’t like asking for help

One of my biggest challenges is knowing when to ask for help. I will fight myself internally and will try to find my own solution much longer than I should. Most times, it turns out to be easier to call up a friend that knows the answer and simply ask for their help. This was a really important lesson for me. I need to get better at identifying when it’s time to ask for help.

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Key question: Do you know when it is time to ask for help? Is it a challenge for you to ask for help? Has that helped or hurt you in the past?

I have my own writing voice and style

Content creation is an often overlooked part of website building. This part can sometimes take longer than actually building the website. So many website building blogs talk about the technical aspects of site design, but fail to elaborate on how to write content. I believe this is because writing content ultimately comes down to finding your own voice.

If you try to write like someone else or imitate another author, your writing will always seem a bit off. If you write in your own voice and style, your message becomes authentic and it will force you to organize your thoughts before you put them up on a public site.

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Key question: Have you thought your message through? Do you know your voice and style?

I need to understand “why” before diving into “how”

There are many quick and easy options for putting a website together. However, I found that even quick website builders like WordPress have a learning curve. I needed to learn how to setup my own hosting, connect my domain name, and do simple modifications using HTML and CSS. I had never done any of this before.

Along the way I started to pick up my own learning style. I am a “why” learner. When I know why I need something, I can then fully grasp the “how to.” Every time I tried to dive into the “how” first, I found myself annoyed and unable to grasp why I was doing it.

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Key question: What’s your learning style and preference? Are you a “why”, “what”, “how”, or “what if” type learner?

I found a good video from Jeanine O’Neill that describes the 4 learning styles

I am pretty good at learning applications, but not coding

Modifying PHP is really hard for me. It has taken me years to learn how to perform some of the smallest modifications. On the other hand, learning to use the backend of my website engine has been fairly easy. I learned that I am really good at learning how to use an application, but not so good at understanding its code. Now I hire someone to help me with that part.

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Key question: What is your aptitude for technology? Which aspects of technology are you good at? What gives you the most challenge?

I am resourceful when it is time to solve problems

Problem solving is a skill. I’ve seen colleagues hit a brick wall and give up. And when building my first website, I ran into a lot of brick walls. I learned that I’m not the type of person who just gives up. My habit is to grab a cup of tea and start googling to find solutions.

Key question: What do you do when you encounter a problem? What is your system for finding a solution?

Featured photo credit: Bluesbby via flickr.com

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Paris Law

Life Coach & Designer

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

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“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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