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5 Questions and Answers About TeleHealth

5 Questions and Answers About TeleHealth

What is telehealth?

The 1960s were a time of great excitement as man, his viruses, bacteria, and other medical ailments sped toward the moon. NASA was faced with the herculean task of providing medical care to astronauts who were millions of miles away, and so Telehealth was born.

By 1975, fifteen active Telehealth projects were in motion and a new era in medicine had taken root.  Soon the project expanded into providing care for patients in both rural communities and space, and today it’s expanding into our homes.

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    It is now possible to organize a 15–20 minute video call with a medical professional in just a few minutes using an iPhone or android app. Imagine the possibilities. Instead of driving to your medical professional’s office, you can now have a virtual visit from the comfort of your own home in complete privacy. If your restrictive work hours are preventing you from seeing your doctor, you can call at any time of night or day. For those who are elderly and infirm, virtual visits are preferable to what can seem to be an epic journey to visit your doctor’s office.

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    Many doctors are using Telehealth to generate additional revenue for their practices by taking video or phone calls between appointments or during no-shows. Once the technology is worked out, it’s every bit as convenient for them as it is for you.

    Other applications of Telehealth include psychotherapist visits to chronic care management services, home healthcare services, social work, occupational therapy, remote monitoring of patient’s vitals, sending medication reminders, and motivational messages via text,

    When should I use Telehealth?

    For acute medical conditions, use Telehealth If:

    • you have a cold, sinus infection, sore throat, UTI, skin rashes, vomiting/diarrhea, or are interested in quitting smoking.
    • you have a mental health conditional such as anxiety or depression and require counseling from a psychologist.
    • you need to talk to a social worker, or a case manager whom you have an existing relationship with about chronic condition.

    Do NOT use Telehealth if:

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    • You are in imminent danger of harming yourself or others. Call 911 or head straight to the nearest emergency room.
    • You are experiencing acute chest pain or unexplained numbness and tingling or the worst headache of your life. Call 911 or head straight to the nearest emergency room.
    • You have a wound or other condition that requires physical care.

    Is Telehealth available in my state?

    American Telehealth Association 2015
      American Telehealth Association 2015

      In 2015, the American Telemedicine Association graded Telehealth throughout the U.S.  The vast majority of states scored at least a B with five states scoring an A, defined as complete parity with physical services.

      There’s a good chance that Telehealth is available in your state.

      Many health insurers have started programs of offering Telehealth services. Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, one of the largest payers in the country, now offers Telehealth doctor’s visits as a covered benefit to its members. There are also private services such as Dr On Demand, Live Health Online, MD Live, and many more. Even WebMD is now looking to provide this service.

      Can I get a prescription?

      During the sign-up process, you will be asked to nominate a pharmacy where you can collect any medications prescribed during your virtual visit. It’s important to understand that while almost all Telehealth providers can prescribe some classes of medications, there are state and federal restrictions to consider.

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      Controlled substances are rarely offered due to federal regulations, though some states such as Texas allow for dispensing in DEA facilities. It is a good idea to check on the Telehealth services web site that you are using to see exactly what conditions they treat, and whether they prescribe for those conditions.

      It is safe to assume that most common medications such as antibiotics will always be covered.

      How does my primary stay in sync?

      At the end of each Telehealth visit, your primary is sent a discharge summary once the visit completes that lists the diagnosis, any prescribed medications, followup instructions, and a range of other information that is designed to keep them completely up to date with what happened in your virtual appointment.

      In most cases the discharge summary is faxed directly to your doctors office on the day of the visit and scanned or imported into your Electronic Medical Record for future reference.

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      “We need to bring the exam room to where the patients are.”
      —Dr. Jay Sanders, telemedicine pioneer

      Featured photo credit: pixabay via pixabay.com

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      Colin Rhodes

      Chief Technology Officer

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      Last Updated on March 13, 2019

      How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

      How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

      Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

      You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

      Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

      1. Work on the small tasks.

      When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

      Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

      2. Take a break from your work desk.

      Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

      Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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      3. Upgrade yourself

      Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

      The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

      4. Talk to a friend.

      Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

      Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

      5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

      If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

      Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

      Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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      6. Paint a vision to work towards.

      If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

      Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

      Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

      7. Read a book (or blog).

      The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

      Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

      Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

      8. Have a quick nap.

      If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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      9. Remember why you are doing this.

      Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

      What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

      10. Find some competition.

      Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

      Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

      11. Go exercise.

      Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

      Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

      As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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      Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

      12. Take a good break.

      Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

      Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

      Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

      Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

      More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

      Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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