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5 reasons why classical music should be part of your music diet

5 reasons why classical music should be part of your music diet

If you thought that classical music was something you got around to only when you reached 60, then you may be missing out on some of the most stimulating and uplifting experiences known to man. But you shake your head with certainty and remind yourself that symphonies equate to sleep medication and concert halls are solely for the lost!

But give it a fair go, and you may be pleasantly surprised. After all, you would do your research on a prospective school for your child, the suburb you plan to move into or the company that you are hoping to find a job in. And you swear by the fact that such research helps you make more informed decisions. So, indulge me for a moment and let us apply that same approach to what could be a potential life changer: classical music.

Let us put aside the obvious benefits that classical music brings to the table – stimulating the brain, improving memory power, exercising the imagination and reducing stress.

Let us instead focus on specific life lessons that classical music can teach us:

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1. Tradition

Classical music celebrates tradition. Brahms owed much of his approach to composition to his idol, Beethoven. Beethoven, in his time, expanded and transformed the musical language that his predecessors, Mozart and Haydn had developed. They in turn, were inspired by the work of Bach and Handel. So this is music that is not ashamed of its roots. This is music that is unapologetic about its heritage. Even contemporary classical music pays homage to the past. In fact, the modern day orchestra still uses for the most part, instruments that had their origins in the 16th century!

Unfortunately, the obsession with the latest fads can often make people cynical about the past. Being “on trend” today becomes such an obsession that we often miss out on the rewards of yesterday’s experiences. Unfortunately, the young are very often suspicious and wary of every institution from the past. Classical music, on the other hand, reminds us that we are all part of a great continuum and we are what we are because of what came before us.

2. Patience and focus

Just as the mystic repeats the sacred chant to reach greater communion with his God, repeated listening to unfamiliar classical music pieces will get us closer to the nirvana they can deliver. But this calls for patience and focus. Classical music is not the trailer; it’s the full feature-length film. It is not the highlights of the Twenty-20 cricket match, but the full five-day test. It is not the comic strip; its the unabridged novel.

We give wine the time it needs to age into that exquisite drink we relish so much; so why not stretch our attentiveness when listening to classical music so we give ourselves the best possible chance to be touched by something truly sublime? Why not develop such an open-minded approach to everything; so we can contend with some of the more unfamiliar and challenging experiences we must all face in life itself!

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3. Symphonic thinking

Classical music helps us achieve what I term ‘symphonic thinking’. While the typical pop song is around 3-4 minutes long, the typical symphony is around 25-40 minutes. And it is not only about the duration. The composers and performers of classical music are dealers in subtleties. There is in this music an emotional and intellectual complexity that is demanding, but also deeply rewarding.

Very rarely is the expression in a symphony in simple ‘black and white’. Very rarely is the experience of a symphony one-dimensional. Symphonies, by their sheer depth and breadth, encourage us to widen our view, expand our consciousness and develop an ‘abundance mentality’. By encouraging ‘big picture’ thinking, they help us extend ourselves to encompass more of life, as it were.

At a time when the media seeks to dumb down every concept and cater to the briefest of attention spans, symphonies challenge us to reach for a richer scope that we are all capable of, if we would only stretch ourselves to discern and enjoy a wider range of emotion and thinking.

4. True collaboration

Listen to any orchestra, choir or chamber music ensemble and one of the most arresting impressions is that of true teamwork. To achieve a unified expression, while playing different instruments (or singing in different voices), with different melodies and at different rhythms, is not a easy task. And beyond the mere notes, there are also potential differences in style and interpretation that each member of the group could have.

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To subsume all of those differences (across extremely passionate and strong-minded musicians) and achieve a unique oneness of utterance is a staggering undertaking! Can this everyday miracle in classical music concert halls teach us to learn true collaboration at work, at home and at play?

5. Discipline and application

To compose or perform classical music requires a level of technical skill that typically demands years of learning and practice. To achieve that, musicians – even the amateurs – must exercise discipline in practice, which is the only way to master their craft. There are no short cuts and any compromise will show up the musician very quickly.

Can we learn to apply ourselves with greater dedication to all those pursuits we believe are worth our devotion?

In the final analysis, classical music is not some fossilized relic or elitist pastime. It has been nurtured by passionate and creative individuals and groups who have often dedicated their lives to creating enduring sound worlds. It can bring us new insights and new thinking if we would only approach it with open-mindedness and enthusiasm. It can stimulate a richer engagement with life. It can help us transcend our limitations. It can help us find true fulfillment.

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Featured photo credit: Piano Keys, Ivan Fernandez

Featured photo credit: Ivan Fernandez via changelessfriend.blogspot.com.au

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5 reasons why classical music should be part of your music diet

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Last Updated on September 18, 2020

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

Learning how to get in shape and set goals is important if you’re looking to live a healthier lifestyle and get closer to your goal weight. While this does require changes to your daily routine, you’ll find that you are able to look and feel better in only two weeks.

Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get in shape. Although anyone can cover the basics (eat right and exercise), there are some things that I could only learn through trial and error. Let’s cover some of the most important points for how to get in shape in two weeks.

1. Exercise Daily

It is far easier to make exercise a habit if it is a daily one. If you aren’t exercising at all, I recommend starting by exercising a half hour every day. When you only exercise a couple times per week, it is much easier to turn one day off into three days off, a week off, or a month off.

If you are already used to exercising, switching to three or four times a week to fit your schedule may be preferable, but it is a lot harder to maintain a workout program you don’t do every day.

Be careful to not repeat the same exercise routine each day. If you do an intense ab workout one day, try switching it up to general cardio the next. You can also squeeze in a day of light walking to break up the intensity.

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If you’re a morning person, check out these morning exercises that will start your day off right.

2. Duration Doesn’t Substitute for Intensity

Once you get into the habit of regular exercise, where do you go if you still aren’t reaching your goals? Most people will solve the problem by exercising for longer periods of time, turning forty-minute workouts into two hour stretches. Not only does this drain your time, but it doesn’t work particularly well.

One study shows that “exercising for a whole hour instead of a half does not provide any additional loss in either body weight or fat”[1].

This is great news for both your schedule and your levels of motivation. You’ll likely find it much easier to exercise for 30 minutes a day instead of an hour. In those 30 minutes, do your best to up the intensity to your appropriate edge to get the most out of the time.

3. Acknowledge Your Limits

Many people get frustrated when they plateau in their weight loss or muscle gaining goals as they’re learning how to get in shape. Everyone has an equilibrium and genetic set point where their body wants to remain. This doesn’t mean that you can’t achieve your fitness goals, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you are struggling to lose weight or put on muscle.

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Acknowledging a set point doesn’t mean giving up, but it does mean realizing the obstacles you face.

Expect to hit a plateau in your own fitness results[2]. When you expect a plateau, you can manage around it so you can continue your progress at a more realistic rate. When expectations meet reality, you can avoid dietary crashes.

4. Eat Healthy, Not Just Food That Looks Healthy

Know what you eat. Don’t fuss over minutia like whether you’re getting enough Omega 3’s or tryptophan, but be aware of the big things. Look at the foods you eat regularly and figure out whether they are healthy or not. Don’t get fooled by the deceptively healthy snacks just pretending to be good for you.

The basic nutritional advice includes:

  • Eat unprocessed foods
  • Eat more veggies
  • Use meat as a side dish, not a main course
  • Eat whole grains, not refined grains[3]

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Eat whole grains when you want to learn how to get in shape.

    5. Watch Out for Travel

    Don’t let a four-day holiday interfere with your attempts when you’re learning how to get in shape. I don’t mean that you need to follow your diet and exercise plan without any excursion, but when you are in the first few weeks, still forming habits, be careful that a week long break doesn’t terminate your progress.

    This is also true of schedule changes that leave you suddenly busy or make it difficult to exercise. Have a backup plan so you can be consistent, at least for the first month when you are forming habits.

    If travel is on your schedule and can’t be avoided, make an exercise plan before you go[4], and make sure to pack exercise clothes and an exercise mat as motivation to keep you on track.

    6. Start Slow

    Ever start an exercise plan by running ten miles and then puking your guts out? Maybe you aren’t that extreme, but burnout is common early on when learning how to get in shape. You have a lifetime to be healthy, so don’t try to go from couch potato to athletic superstar in a week.

    If you are starting a running regime, for example, run less than you can to start. Starting strength training? Work with less weight than you could theoretically lift. Increasing intensity and pushing yourself can come later when your body becomes comfortable with regular exercise.

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    7. Be Careful When Choosing a Workout Partner

    Should you have a workout partner? That depends. Workout partners can help you stay motivated and make exercising more fun. But they can also stop you from reaching your goals.

    My suggestion would be to have a workout partner, but when you start to plateau (either in physical ability, weight loss/gain, or overall health) and you haven’t reached your goals, consider mixing things up a bit.

    If you plateau, you may need to make changes to continue improving. In this case it’s important to talk to your workout partner about the changes you want to make, and if they don’t seem motivated to continue, offer a thirty day break where you both try different activities.

    I notice that guys working out together tend to match strength after a brief adjustment phase. Even if both are trying to improve, something seems to stall improvement once they reach a certain point. I found that I was able to lift as much as 30-50% more after taking a short break from my regular workout partner.

    Final Thoughts

    Learning how to get in shape in as little as two weeks sounds daunting, but if you’re motivated and have the time and energy to devote to it, it’s certainly possible.

    Find an exercise routine that works for you, eat healthy, drink lots of water, and watch as the transformation begins.

    More Tips on Getting in Shape

    Featured photo credit: Alexander Redl via unsplash.com

    Reference

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