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Scientists Discover Our Walking Postures Affect How We Feel

Scientists Discover Our Walking Postures Affect How We Feel

Can you tell me how gloomy and sad people walk? That’s an easy one, you say. They usually have their head down, their shoulders are hunched, and they walk slowly with little arm movement. The way they are walking is a perfect reflection of how they are feeling. But what if it were true when it is the other way round? If people walk with a brisk pace and shoulders back as if they were happy, can that actually improve their mood? Happily, the answer is yes! This is the conclusion of researchers who wanted to see if faking a confident posture will really help you feel better.

“We don’t just fake it ’til we make it, we fake it ’til we become it.” — Amy Cuddy, psychologist, Harvard University

Poses affect how we feel

Researchers looked at animal and human poses, and the differences between power-focused poses and those of hopelessness were evident. There are numerous examples of this: A peacock fans its tail and struts when seducing a female, the CEO of a company sits back with his hands behind his neck with elbows pointing outwards while his feet rest on the desk, depressed people will usually display a pose which is closed, hunched down, and an indicative of powerlessness. This is also evident while walking. The next time you walk, note your posture and your mood. There is a real connection, it seems.

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The researchers were able to show that there were indeed physiological effects, such as changes in testosterone and cortisol levels, which matched the pose and the way people walked. They also noted that there were corresponding behavioral, physiological, and psychological changes. They knew that other research studies show that low-power people have generally bad physical and mental health. They also tend to have poorer memory and immunity.

How the research was carried out

Participants in the study were asked to look at a list of words which contained positive ones such as “happy” and negative ones such as “anxious.” They were then asked to walk on a treadmill. Their walking style was manipulated by researchers and noted. Afterwards, they were asked to remember the words they had been shown. Those who had been walking in a depressed fashion with less arm movement had better recall of all the words but tended to remember more of the negative words. The subjects who had walked with a happier gait had better recall of the more positive words.

The researchers had found enough evidence to justify their claim that a happier posture may have an important role in creating positive moods and energy.

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How this research can help with treatment for depression

In another study, the participants were primed with lots of words connected with old age and infirmity. They were then asked to walk down a hallway and they did so more slowly than the control participants.

It is well known that patients suffering from severe depression tend to remember negative events rather than positive ones. The bad memories make them feel worse.

“If you can break that self-perpetuating cycle, you might have a strong therapeutic tool to work with depressive patients.” — Prof. Nikolaus Troje, study co-author

Exercise is the most underutilized treatment for depression. If patients are encouraged to walk with a confident gait, they can reap even more benefits. The movement is encouraging the neurotransmitters and endorphins which will improve their sense of confidence. The happier posture will help them to become less depressed, more positive, and more energetic.

The next time you want to improve your mood, why not put a bounce in your step and see what happens. Just don’t fall!

“If I could not walk far and fast, I think I should just explode and perish.” — Charles Dickens

Featured photo credit: Antonio Foncubierta/Flickr via flickr.com

More by this author

Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

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1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

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“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

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3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

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6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

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Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

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