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7 Things Only Migraineurs Can Highly Relate To

7 Things Only Migraineurs Can Highly Relate To

Ouch, That’s Not Just A Regular Headache

I can still remember the first migraine I ever suffered. I was 18 and until that point had rarely experienced any headaches whatsoever. That was until I came home from college one day and noticed that my vision wasn’t quite right. I saw some sparks, a few flashes, and I couldn’t bear to look directly at the kitchen light. I lay down on the couch, had a glass of water, and tried to convince myself everything would shortly return to normal. It didn’t. Over the next half an hour, I felt increasingly nauseous. Suddenly, the dinner I’d been looking forward to all afternoon didn’t seem appealing at all.

Then came the pain. For most of the evening, I was in agony. The evening out I’d planned was no longer an option. Instead, I lay still on my bed and clenched my teeth, praying that the pain would soon dissipate. Eventually, it did – but only after I’d vomited. Now I’ve worked out a treatment regimen that helps, but I’ll never forget how terrible those first few migraines were. Worse, I found that many people simply didn’t understand how bad migraines actually are. In that spirit, here is a list of things that only migraine sufferers will relate to!

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1. It’s Hard To Describe The Pain

You can’t see the agony of a migraine, and it can be hard to describe. For some of us, the pain can be crushing. For others, stabbing. Some people experience it as rather like a hammer or ice-pick being driven into their skull. Either way, words are often insufficient to convey just how bad it really is. When migraine sufferers say that they are in pain, it is an understatement!

2. The Pain Interferes With, Well, Everything

It’s hard to plan a normal schedule when you frequently suffer from migraines. An attack can come on with little or no warning, and it can subsequently ruin your plans for the rest of the afternoon, day, or even the remainder of the week – some people are in pain for days at a time.

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3. The Symptoms Aren’t Just Physical

Along with pain, migraine can cause emotional changes. In addition, living with a chronic condition can take its toll not only physically but in a psychological sense too. Never being sure when the next attack will arrive is stressful and exhausting. For the most unfortunate sufferers, their pain and its management can come to form a large part of their identity. They – and others around them – start to see them as “someone who has migraines” rather than as a normal, productive member of society.

4. Migraines Make Even The Basics Hard

Eating, sleeping and even being able to keep liquids down can be made impossible by a migraine. The nausea, dizziness and visual disturbances can make even everyday activities next to impossible. For example, drinking a cup of coffee or eating a light snack can be enough to trigger vomiting in some people.

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5. It Can Be Impossible To Sleep

Whilst some sufferers can sleep with the pain, many cannot. This is exhausting – you are in pain, the pain is tiring, so you want to sleep – but you can’t. A truly vicious cycle can develop, because a lack of sleep can be a trigger for further migraines.

6. A Migraine Really ISN’T Just An Ordinary Headache

A migraine should never be referred to as “just a headache”. This minimizes the pain and suffering endured by those who suffer from them. A migraine is not simply an isolated, painful event – it is often a recurrent problem that has a devastating effect on the lives of many.

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7. There Really Is No Proven Cure For Migraine

Painkillers can work to relieve the symptoms for some people, some of the time. Some other people find that eliminating certain triggers such as stress, coffee and irregular sleep helps reduce the severity and frequency of their attacks. However, the simple fact remains that there is no universal cure for migraine headaches. Most sufferers would have visited medical professionals already, and nothing is more irritating than being told to “see another doctor” or worse, to just to “live with it.”

The next time someone needs educating about what it’s really like to live with migraines, why not forward them this article? It might help them lose some of their misconceptions and understand your pain a little better!

Featured photo credit: Gerald/Pixabay via pixabay.com

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Jay Hill

Jay writes about communication and happiness on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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