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3 Ways to Increase Your Productivity Without Burning Out

3 Ways to Increase Your Productivity Without Burning Out

You want to get more done every day, but you’re already doing so much that the thought of adding anything makes you feel sick to your stomach. How do you get more done without getting bogged down in the daily “urgent” tasks like email and meetings?

Years ago when I started my business I was stuck in that daily grind of emails and appointments that I simply couldn’t get out of. They all felt important but only a few items actually pushed my business forward. The rest was just busy work.

It took me instituting 3 things to get my time back and start pushing the truly important projects forward. Today I want to share those 3 things with you so you can start putting your focus on the right things in your life.

1. Say NO.

This is the most important aspect of getting more productive without burning out. Before you move on to the other things in the list you need to make sure that you’re focused on the right things in your life.

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Last week I had 3 people I know invite me for coffee. I could have said yes, but my real focus is packing a house to move and getting ready for a month-long vacation. Because the important tasks of my week didn’t leave room for going out with friends, I told them to get in touch with me after my vacation.

It’s so easy to want to please a new prospect in business, but before you worry about pleasing them you need to ask yourself if you should even be working with them. Just because someone wants to work with you or sends you an email doesn’t mean that you need to work with them or respond to the email. That request is simply an indication of what they think is important for you to use your time on.

If that prospect doesn’t fit with your current business focus, tell them you can’t work with them. If you get emails asking for your time on things that don’t fit with your current focus, politely decline the opportunity.

Your default answer to any inquiry for your time needs to become “no.” Start with no and then evaluate how the request matches up with your focus. Only change the no to a yes when it matches up with your focus.

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Staying focused on the few things we really should be doing is the best way to keep us energized while making sure that we don’t have a deluge of busy work stealing our attention from what matters.

2. Delegate.

Unfortunately, despite your best efforts there are always going to be some things you can’t say no to. Maybe it’s your taxes. Few people enjoy doing them or are gifted in tax prep, but it’s something we have to do or we can expect the tax agency to come visit you.

Despite having to get my taxes done, I’ve never done them even in a year when I made $8k for 12 months. I paid someone to submit my taxes for me. I don’t even enter my day-to-day receipts; I’ve delegated that to my assistant.

Do you need to set up your weekly email to your email list? Once the content is written, someone else can do the busy work of setting it up in your email marketing software. Your time is more effective spent writing more content.

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If you have any repetitive tasks, delegate them. It’s going to take investment up front to build the training material, but then you don’t have to touch that task again.

Getting these tasks out of your list means you can stay focused on the things that you do best.

3. Automate.

A close cousin to delegation is automation. In fact some people say that before you look at delegation you should be looking at automation because if you can automate a task, it means you don’t need to delegate it.

I use this with my invoicing software 17hats and their “workflows.” Instead of taking a few minutes at the beginning of every project to write the same email and send it, I now just let 17hats take care of the project intro email for me.

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Zapier is another great tool to automate easy repetitive things. You could use Zapier to push your email receipts off to Evernote for long term storage and the person you have entering your business receipts. Investing a few dollars a month in Zapier can save you hours of time a month in repetitive tasks.

What tasks do you do regularly that can be automated? Do you send essentially the same email to every client at the beginning of a project? Save it in a tool like TextExpander and never write it again.

With these three tools in under your belt, you can cut so many of the things that steal your focus. Stop doing things over and over, and instead, automate. What you can’t automate, delegate to someone who can do it better or cheaper.

Most importantly, do a serious evaluation of what you’re doing and make your default answer to new requests “no.” Only say yes to opportunities that you’re passionate about and fit in with your focus.

Doing these three things is going to give you new energy in your life as you only need to focus on the things that matter most to you.

Featured photo credit: pedrosimoes7 via flickr.com

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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