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Top 11 Most Unique Musical Instruments From Around the Globe

Top 11 Most Unique Musical Instruments From Around the Globe

You love music, and you know all about the most common instruments. You know that a piano is technically a string instrument, that the buzz of your mouth that makes a brass instrument sing is called an embouchure, and even all about those tricky and rare double-reed instruments like the oboe and bassoon. Don’t think you know it all just yet; there are still even more instruments that just may blow your mind! Perhaps if you’re brave enough, you’ll try your hand at playing one of these unique musical instruments from around the world, listed in no particular orders. Who knows what hidden talents you’ll discover?

Contrabass Balalaika

This strange instrument originated from Russia in the 17th century. It’s a string instrument played with the fingers, but what gives it its unique quality is that, unlike most string instruments, its body is triangular. That makes it look much like a giant triangular guitar that you might consider a joke if you saw someone play it in person.

Yaybahar

The yaybahar is a tough one to describe, so you’ll have to see it for yourself. (Check it out here.) Essentially, it’s a large setup made of drums and coiled springs. When played, it sounds electric, but it’s actually 100 percent acoustic. The coiled springs make for an interesting echo that’s somewhat reminiscent of laser guns in old space movies. This is a recent invention by Turkish musician Gorkem Sen.

Glass Harmonica

It’s not really a harmonica, but it produces a beautiful sound nonetheless. This strange instrument is also referred to as the:

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  • Armonica
  • Bowl Organ
  • Hydrocystalophone

It uses a series of glass bowls that produce various notes and tones based on their size. The armonica is played through friction of the fingers on the glass as the instrument spins around an axis. It was invented in 1761 by Benjamin Franklin. Take a look at this instrument in action here:

https://youtu.be/eQemvyyJ–g

Hydraulophone

Not many instruments are played using water. Maybe you’ve tried your hand at making music with crystal glasses and water, but you probably haven’t seen anything like a hydraulophone. This bizarre instrument uses direct contact with water to generate sound hydraulically. Invented by Steve Mann, you have to see this one for yourself:

https://youtu.be/GWmiBVndVMY

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Jaw Harp

A jaw harp, also called a GewGew in England — though it goes by many other names depending on the region — is a small instrument made of metal or bamboo. Inside the small frame sits a flexible tongue that creates the vibrations you hear when the instrument is played. The performer places the instrument in their mouth and plucks the tongue of the device to produce a sound. The performer can then influence the pitch by how they form their own lips and tongue as the instrument vibrates.

Lur

The lur is an instrument made of varying materials in numerous sizes and shapes. At its core, a lur is a horned instrument without finger holes. Instead, it’s played by manipulating the shape of your embouchure. This instrument can be dated back to the Bronze Age in areas like Denmark and Germany, but it’s also been seen more recently in Scandinavia during the Middle Ages when it was made of wood. The lur can be straight or curved, sometimes reaching up to two meters, and made of wood or bronze.

Picasso Guitar

As one might suspect, the Picasso guitar was named after painter Pablo Picasso who was known for taking real-life objects and painting them abstractly. The Picasso guitar is much like what you’d expect the painter to create if asked to paint a guitar. Made with 42 strings, four necks, and two sound holes, the guitar doesn’t look like it should actually play music, but it does! This instrument was originally built by jazz guitarist Pat Metheny in 1984.

Sharpsichord

The sharpsichord is an incredibly complicated instrument designed by Henry Dagg. It was created as part of a project by the English Folk Dance and Song Society and took Dagg five years to build. Once completed, he bought himself out of the contract so he could keep the instrument for himself. It contains 11,520 holes along with a solar-powered rotating cylinder that plucks strings inside the instrument.

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Didgeridoo

The didgeridoo is an ancient Australian instrument said to date back 40,000 years, although the exact history of the instrument is unknown. It’s a massive wind instrument in the aerophone category. This straight tube ranges in length from one to three meters, and the opening’s width can vary. It’s played with vibrating lips and doesn’t use any finger holes. Most didgeridoo players use a technique called circular breathing to continuously produce a sound.

Zeusaphone

The Zeusaphone creates music using Tesla coils. This instrument was trademarked in 2007 and remains to be one of the most mesmerizing instruments today. Not only does it create sound, but it makes for a spectacular visual display as well. By connecting the Tesla coils to a computer or keyboard synthesizer, you can make music through electrical arcs that literally light up the stage like lightning. See the Zeusaphone in action here:

https://youtu.be/eXsfGVVGb-Y

Nyckelharpa

The nyckelharpa, also called a keyed fiddle, is considered to be one of the oldest known instruments still around today. It was introduced in Sweden around 1350. It’s made of 16 strings and 37 keys. Players use the keys as frets to change the strings’ pitches while running the bow across the strings. This instrument may be more common than you think, though. There’s actually an American Nyckelharpa Association dedicated to this Swedish instrument. As they report on their website, there are four versions of this instrument played today, which is uncommon for folk instruments. You can search their website for folk music events if you’d like to see a nyckelharpa in person.

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The world is full of strange instruments, so if you think you’ve checked out the bulk of them, think again. Which one of these bizarre instruments would you be most interested in playing or seeing in concert?

Featured photo credit: Shutterstock via shutterstock.com

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Jennifer Paterson

President of California Music Studios

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Last Updated on January 26, 2021

Science Says A Glass Of Red Wine Can Replace 1 Hour Exercising

Science Says A Glass Of Red Wine Can Replace 1 Hour Exercising

Are you a red wine drinker? What if I tell you sipping in a glass of wine can equate to an hour of exercise? Yup, it’s tried and tested. A new scientific study has just confirmed this wonderful news. So next time you hold a glass of Merlot, you can brag about one hour of hard workout. Rejoice, drinkers!

What the study found out

“I think resveratrol could help patient populations who want to exercise but are physically incapable. Resveratrol could mimic exercise for the more improve the benefits of the modest amount of exercise that they can do.”

(applauds)

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I’m not saying this, but the study’s principal investigator Jason Dyck who got it published in the Journal of Physiology in May.

In a statement to ScienceDaily, Dyck pointed out that resveratrol is your magic “natural compound” which lavishes you with the same benefits as you would earn from working out in the gym.

And where do you find it? Fruits, nuts and of course, red wine!

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Did I forget to mention Dyck also researched resveratrol can “enhance exercise training and performance”?

There are limits, of course

But, all is not gold as they say. If you’re a lady who likes to flaunt holding a glass of white wine in the club or simply a Chardonnay-lover,you have a bad (sad) news. The “one hour workout” formula only works with red wine, not non red wines. And don’t be mistaken and think you’ve managed 4 to 6 hours of workout sessions if you happen to gulp down a bottle of red wine.

And what can replace the golden lifetime benefits of exercise?Exercise is just as important as you age. Period! But hey, don’t be discouraged; look at the bigger picture here. A glass of red wine is not a bad deal after all!

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The health benefits of red wine

But just how beneficial is the red alcoholic beverage to your body? As we all know red wine is a healthier choice youc an make when boozing.

Let’s hear it from a registered dietitian. Leah Kaufman lists red wine as the “most calorie friendly” alcoholic beverage. Sure, you won’t mind adding up to a mere 100 calories per 5-ounce glass of red wine after you realize it contains antioxidants, lowers risk of heart disease and stroke, reduces risk of diabetes-related diseases, helps avoid formation of blood clots and lowers bad cholesterol level.

Wantmore? Wine could also replace your mouthwash because the flavan-3-ols in red wines can control the “bad bacteria” in your mouth.To add to that list of benefits, moderate wine drinking may be beneficial for your eyes too – a recent study mentions.

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Be aware of the risks, too

Having mentioned all the ‘goods’ about red wine, you cannot underplay the fact that it is still an alcohol, which isn’t the best stuff to pour into your body. What is excessive drinking going to do to your body? Know the risks and you should be a good drinker at the end of the day.

However, you don’t want to discard the red vino from your “right eating”regimen just because it stains your teeth blue. M-o-d-e-r-a-t-i-o-n. Did you read that? That’s the operative word when it comes to booze.

By the way, when chocolate is paired with wine, particularly red, they can bring you some exceptional benefits towards your health.But again, if you tend to go overboard and booze down bottles after bottles, you are up for the negative side of alcohol, and we all know what too much of sweetness (sugar) can do to our body (open invitation to diabetes and heart diseases if you aren’t aware).

Folks, the red grape beverage is certainly a good buy to have a good hour’s worth of cardio, provided you keep the ‘M’ word in mind. Cheers!

Featured photo credit: James Palinsad via flickr.com

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