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Showing Compassion For Animals Can Improve Your Health, Research Says

Showing Compassion For Animals Can Improve Your Health, Research Says

“Our task must be to free ourselves… by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and its beauty.” — Albert Einstein

Did you know that having compassion for others improves your health? If you’re a pet owner or animal lover, you’ll be pleased to learn that this includes showing kindness to your furry, feathered, and scaled friends, too. Just by petting your dogs and cats, and being kind to creatures in the wild, you enhance your mental and physical health, lower anxiety and depression, recover from illnesses more quickly, and increase your lifespan. Here are some of the reasons why this compassion is so beneficial.

1. Compassion Improves Well-being

“Until one has loved an animal, a part of one’s soul remains unawakened.” — Anatole France

The two cats I rescued from an animal shelter a couple of years ago actually rescued me. These unwanted felines helped me to find hope and resilience after losing my father to Parkinson’s Disease. Two-year-old Ziggy was on the kill list because it would cost too much to pull his bad teeth. And Zoe was getting “too old” to be adoptable. These playful friends showed me unconditional love, made me laugh, and helped me feel like I was not alone after I’d walled myself off from the world. Can you relate?

Studies show that spending 15 to 30 minutes of quality time with your pets makes you feel more relaxed. Playing with your dogs and cats increases feel-good neurotransmitters that help balance mood (serotonin) and control the brain’s pleasure centers (dopamine). Just watching reunions between dogs and their owners, and cats with the people they own, shows how much joy these pets can bring to our lives.

2. Compassion Boosts Physical Health

“Dogs are not our whole lives, but they make our lives whole.” — Roger Caras

My friend Mary told me about how a middle-aged Golden Retriever turned her mother’s declining health around. Mary had given Andy to her mom to serve as a constant companion now that she was stuck at home ailing from a condition she was unmotivated to improve. Over time, Andy gained a lot of weight. Her mother felt such compassion for the canine that she forced herself to get up and walk him a little each day. At first it was just a few steps, then a couple of blocks, and now miles. Not only did Andy lose the weight, but Mary’s mother looks and feels ten years younger.

Having a dog prompts us to exercise more, which lowers our blood pressure and make us less likely to get heart disease. In general, people with dogs visit their doctor less often than people who don’t have dogs. And owning a cat lowers the chances of dying from a heart attack. Loving our pets lowers stress, thus diminishing the risk that we’ll get a whole host of nasty diseases.

3. Compassion Increases Vitality and Longevity

“Compassion brings us to a stop, and for a moment we rise above ourselves.” — Mason Cooley

Playing and laughing with your dogs and cats can help boost your immune system and increase your day-to-day energy levels. According to Mao Shing Ni, PhD, “numerous studies have shown that having pets helps lower our stress levels, decrease blood pressure, benefit our cholesterol, improve our mood, and boost our immunity – in other words, lengthen our life span.”

Other research shows that volunteerism predicts a longer and healthier life. For 26 years, Jung Myoung has saved hundreds of dogs from being eaten in South Korea, where they’re considered a delicacy. She buys them from dog traders and is still going strong at age 61 under tough circumstances.

4. Compassion Gives Us Possibilities

“When I look into the eyes of an animal, I do not see an animal. I see a living being. I see a friend. I feel a soul.” — Anthony Douglas Williams

Believing that you have possibilities gives you a higher quality of life, especially when you’re physically impaired. Kirsten Klindworth was confined to a wheelchair and could no longer ride her beloved Arabian horse Synbaadd (aka Cory). Once Francine Dismukes trained Cory to lie down so that Kristin could mount him, she was able to ride him again and set her soul free.

Service dogs lessen anxiety and depression in their owners, giving them hope for the future. There are even seeing eye horses now, too!  Dan Shaw calls Cuddles, the first documented case, his “best friend and guiding light.”

5. The Compassion Animals Show Each Other is Inspiring

“An animal’s eyes have the power to speak a great language.” — Martin Buber

Rademenes is a black cat in a Polish animal shelter who was dropped off to be euthanized, but miraculously recovered from an upper-respiratory infection. He now spends his days helping to nurse sick cats and dogs back to health. Maggie, a mutt who had been admitted to the AARCS shelter, heard new foster pups crying their first night there and escaped from her kennel to sit next to their room and watch over them. Hantu, a white German Shepherd, adopted Poncho, an orphaned baby opossum who regularly rides on her back. Vali, a brown bear in a Budapest zoo, saved a crow from drowning. Footage shows a fox nursing BEAR cubs in a forest after their mother died. Elephants hug and comfort each other in times of distress.

These are just a few of the examples which show that this kind of compassion is in the nature of many animals.

6. The Compassion Animals Show Humans is Inspiring

“We should have more respect for animals because it makes us better humans.” — Jane Goodall

There are several stories of cats saving human lives. For example, a surveillance video captured a cat rescuing a four-year-old boy from a vicious unprovoked dog attack (that video has over 25 millionYouTube views).

A dolphin prevented a teenager from drowning, a calf saved a woman from a snake, a gorilla rescued a boy from being attacked by other gorillas in a zoo, a pit bull protected a mother and young son from being knifed by a man in a playground… the list goes on.

7. Compassion Can Be Taught

“Compassion is a muscle that gets stronger with use.” — Gandhi

In Russia, homeless cats and dogs die not only from hunger, cold, and accidents, but also from beatings and beheadings in appalling numbers by children who were not given enough attention and love (many are orphans). Big Hearts Foundation is reducing the incidence of animal cruelty by teaching kids to develop empathy, love, and care for animals through the use of cartoons.

Kevin Richardson, a South African Zoologist, hugs lions and shows how playful these cats can be to engender compassion in hunters in the hopes of preventing them from killing off this dwindling precious wildlife.

8. Compassion Is Instinctive

“Until we extend our circle of compassion to all living beings, humanity will not find peace.” — Dr. Albert Schweitzer, 1952 Nobel Peace Prize

At the Interspecies Equality Sanctuary in Santiago, Chile, a refuge for farm animals, Marina the kitten and Laura the piglet bonded after surviving extremely tough starts in life. According to the sanctuary owner, “Laura has formed a deep friendship with Marina the kitten, showing by example, that when it comes to relations of friendship and respect, it doesn’t matter the species to which one belongs.”

And Lilica, a superhero mutt in Brazil, travels miles to bring food back to her chicken, cat, and dog friends in a junkyard. According to the junkyard owner, Neile Vãnia Antônio, “we human beings, we almost never share things with others. Now for an animal to share with others, it’s a… life lesson for us.”

9. Compassion Makes Us Feel Good

“We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals.” — Immanuel Kant

As I did research for this article, I have to admit that I was blown away by the sheer volume of stories I found on animals exhibiting concern and care for each other. If they can do it, so can we. And we do.

An everyday hero un-trapped a Bighorn sheep he encountered while jogging in the woods. Two good samaritans rescued a deer who was stranded on an ice pond. Beach-goers helped save a beached Great white shark. Valentin Gruener saved Sirga, a lioness cub abandoned by her pride, from dying. John Unger held his beloved dog Schoep in a lake every day to help relieve his pooch’s pain from arthritis.

Inspiring, right? So, why not show an animal a little extra love and tenderness today? You don’t have to go as far as hugging a lion, but you can spend more quality time with your pets. Let’s be honest. It’s pretty easy to overlook them when we get caught up in our fast-paced, hectic world. But they don’t live as long as we do (usually), and our time together is precious. Make it count. Expressing empathy for animals not only lifts your mood, lowers stress, and boosts your health, but it cracks your heart wide open, too.

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Featured photo credit: http://www.earthporm.com via lionwhisperer.co.za

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Dr. Michelle Millis Chappel

Michelle is a psychology-professor-turned-rock-star who has helped thousands of people create successful meaningful lives by using their superpowers.

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Last Updated on October 20, 2020

How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

You have a deadline looming. However, instead of doing your work, you are fiddling with miscellaneous things like checking email, social media, watching videos, surfing blogs and forums. You know you should be working, but you just don’t feel like doing anything.

We are all familiar with the procrastination phenomenon. When we procrastinate, we squander away our free time and put off important tasks we should be doing them till it’s too late. And when it is indeed too late, we panic and wish we got started earlier.

The chronic procrastinators I know have spent years of their life looped in this cycle. Delaying, putting off things, slacking, hiding from work, facing work only when it’s unavoidable, then repeating this loop all over again. It’s a bad habit that eats us away and prevents us from achieving greater results in life.

Don’t let procrastination take over your life. Here, I will share my personal steps on how to stop procrastinating. These 11 steps will definitely apply to you too:

1. Break Your Work into Little Steps

Part of the reason why we procrastinate is because subconsciously, we find the work too overwhelming for us. Break it down into little parts, then focus on one part at the time. If you still procrastinate on the task after breaking it down, then break it down even further. Soon, your task will be so simple that you will be thinking “gee, this is so simple that I might as well just do it now!”.

For example, I’m currently writing a new book (on How to achieve anything in life). Book writing at its full scale is an enormous project and can be overwhelming. However, when I break it down into phases such as –

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  • (1) Research
  • (2) Deciding the topic
  • (3) Creating the outline
  • (4) Drafting the content
  • (5) Writing Chapters #1 to #10,
  • (6) Revision
  • (7) etc.

Suddenly it seems very manageable. What I do then is to focus on the immediate phase and get it done to my best ability, without thinking about the other phases. When it’s done, I move on to the next.

2. Change Your Environment

Different environments have different impact on our productivity. Look at your work desk and your room. Do they make you want to work or do they make you want to snuggle and sleep? If it’s the latter, you should look into changing your workspace.

One thing to note is that an environment that makes us feel inspired before may lose its effect after a period of time. If that’s the case, then it’s time to change things around. Refer to Steps #2 and #3 of 13 Strategies To Jumpstart Your Productivity, which talks about revamping your environment and workspace.

3. Create a Detailed Timeline with Specific Deadlines

Having just 1 deadline for your work is like an invitation to procrastinate. That’s because we get the impression that we have time and keep pushing everything back, until it’s too late.

Break down your project (see tip #1), then create an overall timeline with specific deadlines for each small task. This way, you know you have to finish each task by a certain date. Your timelines must be robust, too – i.e. if you don’t finish this by today, it’s going to jeopardize everything else you have planned after that. This way it creates the urgency to act.

My goals are broken down into monthly, weekly, right down to the daily task lists, and the list is a call to action that I must accomplish this by the specified date, else my goals will be put off.

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Here’re more tips on setting deadlines: 22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

4. Eliminate Your Procrastination Pit-Stops

If you are procrastinating a little too much, maybe that’s because you make it easy to procrastinate.

Identify your browser bookmarks that take up a lot of your time and shift them into a separate folder that is less accessible. Disable the automatic notification option in your email client. Get rid of the distractions around you.

I know some people will out of the way and delete or deactivate their facebook accounts. I think it’s a little drastic and extreme as addressing procrastination is more about being conscious of our actions than counteracting via self-binding methods, but if you feel that’s what’s needed, go for it.

5. Hang out with People Who Inspire You to Take Action

I’m pretty sure if you spend just 10 minutes talking to Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, you’ll be more inspired to act than if you spent the 10 minutes doing nothing. The people we are with influence our behaviors. Of course spending time with Steve Jobs or Bill Gates every day is probably not a feasible method, but the principle applies — The Hidden Power of Every Single Person Around You

Identify the people, friends or colleagues who trigger you – most likely the go-getters and hard workers – and hang out with them more often. Soon you will inculcate their drive and spirit too.

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As a personal development blogger, I “hang out” with inspiring personal development experts by reading their blogs and corresponding with them regularly via email and social media. It’s communication via new media and it works all the same.

6. Get a Buddy

Having a companion makes the whole process much more fun. Ideally, your buddy should be someone who has his/her own set of goals. Both of you will hold each other accountable to your goals and plans. While it’s not necessary for both of you to have the same goals, it’ll be even better if that’s the case, so you can learn from each other.

I have a good friend whom I talk to regularly, and we always ask each other about our goals and progress in achieving those goals. Needless to say, it spurs us to keep taking action.

7. Tell Others About Your Goals

This serves the same function as #6, on a larger scale. Tell all your friends, colleagues, acquaintances and family about your projects. Now whenever you see them, they are bound to ask you about your status on those projects.

For example, sometimes I announce my projects on The Personal Excellence Blog, Twitter and Facebook, and my readers will ask me about them on an ongoing basis. It’s a great way to keep myself accountable to my plans.

8. Seek out Someone Who Has Already Achieved the Outcome

What is it you want to accomplish here, and who are the people who have accomplished this already? Go seek them out and connect with them. Seeing living proof that your goals are very well achievable if you take action is one of the best triggers for action.

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9. Re-Clarify Your Goals

If you have been procrastinating for an extended period of time, it might reflect a misalignment between what you want and what you are currently doing. Often times, we outgrow our goals as we discover more about ourselves, but we don’t change our goals to reflect that.

Get away from your work (a short vacation will be good, else just a weekend break or staycation will do too) and take some time to regroup yourself. What exactly do you want to achieve? What should you do to get there? What are the steps to take? Does your current work align with that? If not, what can you do about it?

10. Stop Over-Complicating Things

Are you waiting for a perfect time to do this? That maybe now is not the best time because of X, Y, Z reasons? Ditch that thought because there’s never a perfect time. If you keep waiting for one, you are never going to accomplish anything.

Perfectionism is one of the biggest reasons for procrastination. Read more about why perfectionist tendencies can be a bane than a boon: Why Being A Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect.

11. Get a Grip and Just Do It

At the end, it boils down to taking action. You can do all the strategizing, planning and hypothesizing, but if you don’t take action, nothing’s going to happen. Occasionally, I get readers and clients who keep complaining about their situations but they still refuse to take action at the end of the day.

Reality check:

I have never heard anyone procrastinate their way to success before and I doubt it’s going to change in the near future. Whatever it is you are procrastinating on, if you want to get it done, you need to get a grip on yourself and do it.

Bonus: Think Like a Rhino

More Tips for Procrastinators to Start Taking Action

Featured photo credit: Malvestida Magazine via unsplash.com

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