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Amazing Benefits Of Oats (+5 Refreshing Recipes)

Amazing Benefits Of Oats (+5 Refreshing Recipes)

When most people think of oats, they may first picture something less than appetizing: instant oatmeal, flavorless granola, or bland “diet” food. If this all you think of, you are definitely doing it wrong. With the right recipe, oats are not only delicious and easy to prepare, but they also provide incredible health benefits. Check out five proven health benefits of oats that will convince you to give this classic ingredient another chance.

1. Oats lower your levels of bad cholesterol.

Oats have about a 5% concentration of beta-glucans, a naturally occurring type of dietary fiber. Scientific studies about foods with high beta-glucans have shown that they keep your intestines from absorbing too much LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, promote healthy liver function, and turn your gut bacteria into fatty acids that contribute to a healthy cholesterol level. Most people don’t know that steel-cut oats are the best kind of oats to eat to get these LDL cholesterol-lowering effects.

2. Oats reduce heart attacks, strokes, and hypertension.

Oats contain a high amount of magnesium, an important mineral in hundreds of processes in the body. Magnesium can lower instances of heart attack and stroke by promoting normal blood flow and a healthy blood pressure level. A 2002 study indicates that eating whole oat cereals every day reduces both systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and improves the body’s insulin response in just six weeks.

3. Oats provide a healthy, plant-based source of protein.

Compared to other grains, oats provide the healthiest balance of proteins, fatty acids, and amino acids. In fact, just one half-cup serving of oats can provide almost 15% of your daily protein needs. Oats are a wonderful way to be sure you get enough protein, particularly for vegetarians and vegans. With 2015 research indicating that red meat causes cancer, oats are the perfect protein alternative for anyone who wants to be healthier.

4. Oats can help you lose weight.

Did you know that oats have more fiber than any other grain? The high soluble fiber content of oats aids in the digestion process and helps you feel more full. A recent study on satiety—the feeling of being full—reveals that oats, specifically in the form of oatmeal, make people feel significantly fuller than other types of foods. This longer-lasting feeling of fullness helps dieters consume fewer calories overall. And the best part? You get all the other health benefits of oats, too!

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5. Oats lower the risk for certain types of cancer.

Several studies have connected diets high in natural fiber with lower rates of colorectal cancer. Researchers have found that people who regularly eat fiber-rich foods have a lower rate of developing colorectal tumors. Though science has not yet definitively proven that fibrous foods prevent colorectal cancer, it is clear that foods like oats contribute to a healthier colon. Because they help with weight maintenance and loss, high-fiber foods like oats lower the risk of cancers that are associated with obesity.

Easy Ways to Incorporate the Benefits of Oats into Your Diet

Now that you know the proven health benefits of oats, you may be wondering how you can add them into your diet. With the five recipes below, you can easily add a healthy serving of oats into your daily routine. Adjust the ingredient amounts as necessary, or make extra to share with friends and family.

Oat bran muffins

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    Required ingredients: oat bran, brown sugar, all-purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, eggs, applesauce, vegetable oil

    These muffins are effortless to make, and the applesauce adds a hint of natural sweetness. Blend all of the ingredients together and bake in a muffin pan for 15 minutes. Mix in cinnamon or nutmeg, or add them to the top right before baking, for a spiced twist.

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    Sunshine morning muesli

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      Required ingredients: rolled oats, oat bran, dried fruit and nuts of your choice, cinnamon, yogurt, milk

      For those who may not like to bake, here’s an easy and healthful recipe for breakfast. Mix together the yogurt, oats, oat bran, dried fruits, and cinnamon in a large bowl. Place in the fridge overnight. Before eating, pour a small amount of milk over your bowl, and add any nuts or seeds you like.

      Healthy banana cookies

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        Required ingredients: rolled oats, bananas, dates, vegetable oil, vanilla extract

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        This recipe takes less than an hour, and the cookies are a healthy alternative to a sugar-rich dessert. While the oven is heating, mash the bananas with the other ingredients. Use a spoon to place drops on a cookie sheet, and bake for 20 minutes.

        Light oat bread

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          Required ingredients: water, margarine or butter, salt, flour, rolled oats, brown sugar, active dry yeast

          If you have a bread machine, this recipe is a breeze. Simply add the ingredients to your machine’s bread pan according to the manufacturer’s recommended instructions. Cook the bread on the light setting, and enjoy!

          Slow cooker oats

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          Slow Cooker Oats pic
            Required ingredients:

            steel oats, water, peeled and chopped apples, raisins, butter, cinnamon, brown sugar, vanilla extract

            This is an incredibly easy recipe, so it’s great for people on the go. Just throw all the ingredients into the slow cooker and cook on low for six to eight hours. For extra nutrition, add your favorite fruit right before eating. The steel-cut oats make this recipe especially heart-healthy.

            Craving more healthy recipes? Add some oats to these five smoothie recipes for an extra health boost!

            Photo credits: Steel cut oats, banana oat bars, banana oat blueberry biscuits, breakfast porridge, no knead oat bread! via Flickr

            Featured photo credit: Vladislav Nosik via shutterstock.com

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            Last Updated on February 24, 2021

            How to Find Workout Motivation When You Hate Exercise

            How to Find Workout Motivation When You Hate Exercise

            It’s easy to fall into a mindset where you hate exercise. It does, indeed, demand a lot from you. You have to use special clothes, develop a routine and exercise habit, get out of the comfort of your own home, and wear yourself out to the point where you just want to collapse into bed. Fortunately, while there are a lot of reasons to dislike exercise, there are even more reasons to love it.

            If you want to stop hating exercises and making excuses to avoid it, here’s how to tackle each one of those exercise excuses, get into action, and give your body the attention it craves.

            1. I Have to Exercise 30 Minutes Each Day to Get Results

            Most of us have a number that we think we should hit in order to exercise “enough.” For some people, this is the daily recommended minimum of 30 minutes. For others, it’s 45 minutes of weight-training plus another 45 minutes of cardio.

            I’m not going to put up a fight with your number here. What I am going to do is challenge your idea of starting with that number right away. You see, even though 30 minutes a day might not seem like a lot, 30 minutes a day for the next 5 years is actually too much for your habitual brain to process.

            So yes, everyone can do 30 minutes of daily exercise for one week. But how many people can do that for the next 5 years?

            Starting small has the advantage of bypassing your brain’s fight-or-flight response, the mechanism that make you sabotage yourself when you are trying to do something that seems “big” for too long and makes you hate exercise.

            This way, instead of mindlessly starting with an exercise program, you focus on building the habit first, and then once you are exercising a little bit every day, you are ready to expand how much exercise you do.

            2. I Don’t Want to Have to Force Myself to Do It

            If you have to force yourself to do it, then there is a 90% chance that you are doing it wrong, and you will never stick to exercise.

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            Some people are motivated by challenges and others pushing them, while others hate it.

            If you are one of the people who hate it, stop trying to change yourself, and of course, stop treating yourself as if you were one of those people who are motivated by challenges and being pushed. The more you use this approach on yourself, the more you’ll hate exercise and avoid it in the long term.

            Instead, change the way you approach exercise. Stop falling into what I call the “Happiness Paradox Trap.” Instead of starting with what you think you “should do,” start with what feels good.

            Maybe weight lifting and running aren’t your thing, but have you tried Zumba or Pilates classes? Maybe you hate the feel of a gym, so try getting into cycling instead. Don’t feel that there’s one right way to go about it, and do your best to make it your own.

            3. I’m Not Motivated Enough

            We think that motivation is the answer to sticking to exercise. If only we wanted it enough, then we would make it happen.

            However, motivation is always there. If you feel you wish you exercised more, then you are motivated to exercise. If you are not doing it, it’s not because you are not motivated. It’s because something stops you.

            It might be the activated fight-or-flight response we talked about in #1. For example, when you feel that you have too much to do, the fight-or-flight response kicks in, and you do nothing.

            People who have already made exercise a daily ritual don’t depend on boosting their motivation to get off the couch and exercise. They just do it, naturally, without debating it with themselves, desperately trying to get themselves into action.

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            Maybe you think you need to devote 1 hour and you don’t know how to do that. Or, maybe you think you need to suffer to get results. Whatever the real reason is, find it. Only then will you be able to figure out a way to remove the obstacle that is on your way.

            4. I Don’t Need Exercise to Lose Weight

            Many people only care about their weight. Yet, our bodies are naturally wired to feel good when we move. Here is a quick list of the benefits of exercise:

            • Decreases the risk of various diseases and bad health conditions, like high cholesterol, diabetes, stroke, certain types of cancer, arthritis, and cardiovascular diseases.
            • Increases longevity. Many research studies support the fact that exercise can reverse some signs of aging and reduce chances of death by any cause.[1]
            • Improves mood. Exercise does not just help depressed people; it helps everyone, even those who hate exercise. A quick workout or walk stimulates various brain chemicals that may leave you feeling happier and more relaxed.
            • Increases your energy levels. Regular physical activity boosts your endurance and helps your heart and lungs work more efficiently. And yes, that means more energy available for you.
            • Improves sleep. Regular physical activity can help you sleep better and fall asleep more easily, as long as you don’t exercise a couple of hours prior to bedtime.
            • Improves sex life. Erectile dysfunction? Lack of libido? Just lack of energy? Exercise may help with all of that.
            • Helps you better control your weight. Exercise helps you burn calories, plus you build muscle that generally burns more calories than fat. Exercise is a great add-on to a diet or weight maintenance plan.
            • Gets you better lab results, even if you are overweight. Did you know that an obese person who is fit, i.e., exercises regularly, will show better lab results than a thin person who never exercises?

            5. Exercise Needs All of My Attention

            Maybe you are currently busy with your work life, or you are planning a trip next week. Maybe your child just got sick and needs your constant attention. Shouldn’t you just wait until you can give exercise 100% of your attention?

            This rationale once again sounds plausible, but just like the “I don’t have time” excuse, is it really true? Is not starting because you are not “ready” the best thing for you right now? Is neglecting yourself and your body for a few more weeks/months/years a good strategy?

            Finally, how many months or years will you spend before you get all your ducks in a row?

            6. I Find Exercise Boring

            Most advice in response to this excuse tells you to find something that you actually like. Yet, I know that for most people, exercise itself is rarely the thing that makes you hate exercise. Having to do it for “too long” is the issue.

            That’s why I said that if 30 minutes are boring, try 5 or 10.

            Now, if this idea of starting small stresses you out, let me remind you the wisdom of #1–the fact that you may want to be exercising one hour a day doesn’t mean you have to start from one hour right away. You can start small, and as you feel more and more comfortable, build your way up.

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            Getting into a fitness program or hiring a personal trainer for a couple of weeks can also help you find a routine that interests you.

            7. I Have Negative Past Experiences

            I understand that you came last at the sprint race when you were at school. I understand that you may feel embarrassed when you attend fitness classes. Luckily, your past does not need to define your future.

            A client of mine wanted to start jogging. She started by walking around the neighborhood. Yet, she found out she felt really uncomfortable feeling that her neighbors were watching her.

            She accepted that, and worked her way around it. Instead of walking around her own block, she walked around the block next to her own block, and the problem was solve. A few months later, she was already jogging 2 miles a couple of times a week.

            8. I Hate the Hassle of Exercise

            If you think you need to exercise for an hour, take a shower, and drive to the gym and back, then you have two hours gone, just like that. You might like moving your body, but you certainly don’t like having to spend all this time working out!

            Luckily, exercise that gets you results doesn’t have to take all this time and scheduling brainpower.

            To start, you could do something that takes less time and planning, like exercising at home. You may feel more comfortable if you get to work out within sight of your comfy sofa instead of driving 20 minutes to the nearest gym.

            You can also try automating. For example, if you go to the gym after work, make sure your gym bag is ready from the day before, so you don’t have to deal with that during your busy morning.

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            9. I Don’t Have Enough Time to Exercise

            Even though we know people busier than us who actually exercise, we keep saying we are “too busy,” and we hate exercise for making us even busier.

            Have you ever thought that being “busy” is actually a lie? If there are busier people than you who make it happen, then so could you. Yet, even though we acknowledge that, we still believe it’s true.

            It’s time to admit that time is not the main issue. It’s probably the way your are prioritizing things, and you are afraid you’ll have to give up something else in favor of exercise. Whatever the real reason, you need to find it if you want to give your body a chance to thrive.

            If you don’t know where to start when finding time to exercise, check out Lifehack’s free 4 Step Guide to Creating More Time Out of a Busy Schedule.

            10. Exercise Will Take Time Away From Other Things

            You might be worried that exercise will take too much of your time, or that you’ll need to give up another hobby or time with your family to do it.

            If you don’t want to hate exercise, you must first stop making it the enemy. If it is the thing that will “stop you” from doing other things, you’ll likely never convince yourself that it’s worth it.

            However, if exercise becomes the thing that will help you become healthier, be more active for your kids, and focus more at work, it then becomes a necessity that you’re willing to make room for in your life.

            The Bottom Line

            It can often feel natural to hate exercise. Life is already demanding a lot from us, and exercise is just one more thing we have to squeeze in. However, once you realize all of the benefits you can receive from it, it will feel less like a chore and more like the part of your day you look most forward to.

            More on Getting Into the Exercise Habit

            Featured photo credit: Minna Hamalainen via unsplash.com

            Reference

            [1] Maturitas: Exercise and longevity

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