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The Perfect Way to Build Your Website

The Perfect Way to Build Your Website

Perhaps it is a platitude, but there is no ideal way to build a website. What will serve perfectly in one situation is going to be completely unacceptable in another one. A method suitable for a large company will be prohibitively expensive for a humble personal blog. When all is said and done, the ideal way is all about what exactly you need.

1. Doing It Yourself

If you are not averse to technology and have some free time on your hands, you may consider building your website on your own. It may require building up some skills before you can create something you wouldn’t be ashamed of showing the world, but it is, naturally, the cheapest approach of them all. Judge for yourself – depending on your personal predisposition it may even turn out to be enjoyable and, at the very least, enlightening. Learning new skills is always useful. If you are worried about making a mess of the job, don’t be – the proliferation of free WordPress themes has made this scene much friendlier to newcomers than in the past. But of course, building a large and modern-looking website may turn out to be too difficult for a beginner.

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2. Hiring a Company

Services of some web developer companies may look a bit costly at a glance, but if you choose wisely and take into consideration that they cover all eventualities from building websites to maintenance and troubleshooting, while offering stability and guaranteeing results in time, you will see that their fees are quite reasonable. If you want to make sure the company you hire is a respectable and trustworthy one, it is advisable to use online directories. This way, for example, you will be easily able to get a full list of Drupal development companies you can hire without any second thoughts and choose from them at your leisure.

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3. Hiring a Freelancer

Dealing with freelancers, unless they come highly recommended by the people you trust, is a kind of a roulette. Sometimes you may find an astonishingly capable individual ready to work for a fraction of what you would have to pay a full-fledged web development studio, but you may just as well stumble upon somebody who will blow all the deadlines, give you nothing but promises in the meanwhile, try to rip you off, and you will be lucky to get even a subpar website for your trouble. In other words, hiring a freelancer is a reasonable approach if you want to save money and don’t mind some risk. The risks aren’t as bad as one may think, after all – most freelance websites are pretty good at weeding out irresponsible workers early on.

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4. Using a Website Template

If you really cannot be bothered to get any deeper, using a website template may be a way out. As most of the expenses of website building is associated with design, by removing it from the equation you drastically decrease the overall costs. Essentially, using a template means that you simply upload everything you need into a pre-existing package. There is no need to hire somebody or learn to code. There are drawbacks, of course. Templates usually come without CMS, and the knowledge required to alter something is much greater than for using WordPress. Your website won’t be unique. There will be little to no flexibility. In other words, this approach can only be recommended if the site you need is rather simple, and you want it up and running as fast as possible.

As you can see, choosing an ideal way to build a website isn’t as straightforward as it first appears. We hope that these tips will help you make a choice that is right for you.

Featured photo credit: Business Woman Typing On Keyboard With track Pad/Ed Gregory via stokpic.com

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Melissa Burns

Entrepreneur

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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