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Why Severus Snape Is Seemingly Evil But A Great Man To Love

Why Severus Snape Is Seemingly Evil But A Great Man To Love

Even though I believe that this extraordinary man doesn’t require an official introduction, I came to realize that not everyone is in love with the Harry Potter series as I am. He goes by many titles – a Muggle-Born, a Slytherin, the Half-Blood Prince, a Death Eater, a professor, a man who’s bitter and spiteful, and a loyal man in love. This is how I see him.

1. He Is Powerful

01 Potions Master

    In the beginning, we get to know Severus as a great Potions Master. He’s obviously extremely talented and very aware of it. As the story reveals itself through the books, the fifth one, “Harry Potter and the Order of Phoenix”, tells us another two quite distinguishing skills this troubled professor has – occlumency and legilimency.

    For those who are less familiar with the HP dictionary, when a wizard develops these particular powers, he’s capable to close his mind from foreign attacks and even enter another and basically read it. Finally, the whole series shows us how “enthusiastic” Severus is about the Dark Arts by his constant efforts to finally become the Defense Against the Dark Arts professor.

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    If there’s something that the HP series taught us, as far as I’m concerned at least, it’s that power comes with great responsibility. This set of skills is quite brilliant and it was up to professor Snape to decide whether he will use them for good or bad.

    “But I think it is clear that we can expect great things from you. After all, He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named did great things. Terrible! Yes. But great.” – Mr. Ollivander about Lord Voldemort to Harry in the first book, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.

    Although this gifted wandmaker was talking about Lord Voldemort here, I believe that we can apply this quote to Severus, as well. He would be magnificent on both sides, and we can feel rather fortunate that he chose the good one. However, the amount of his power often led us to think that he just might not do that in the very end.

    2. He Is Mysterious

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    02 Protective

      If we neglect his dark and sudden appearance, it’s still difficult to discover professor Snape’s intentions throughout the HP series because of that veil of mystery he’s constantly covered in. The first book, and the movie accordingly, shows him as the main suspect who seems to go after the Sorcerer’s Stone, that gives immortal life to the one who possesses it.

      Although the third book sheds a bit of light on his character, because he jumps in front of a werewolf in order to protect the protagonist trio – Hermione, Ron and Harry – he still has an awful desire to give Harry’s innocent godfather to the authorities. Be that as it may, Dumbledore gives him a crucial part in the Order of Phoenix, when he once again confirms how he trusts him completely and allows him to act as a spy.

      All this trust we came to put in him, just as the characters did, crumbles into the ground when he kills the greatest headmaster that Hogwarts had ever seen, Dumbledore himself. Unfortunately, his intentions weren’t clear until the very end, when everything is explained to Harry and us, the anxious readers, in one of the final chapters when Harry uses the Pensive – a smart little object that can revive memories – to find out the truth about how professor Snape never stopped loving his mother.

      3. He Has His Mind Made Up

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      03 Spiteful

        There are many things Severus teaches us, but being indecisive isn’t one of them. The first three parts are very clear about how much professor Snape hated Harry’s father, James, but not until the fifth book did we get to realize why.

        During Harry’s occlumency lessons, he seems to manage to penetrate Severus’ mind and accidently sees a couple of disturbing memories when Severus is at Hogwarts and he’s being, well, bullied by James, Harry’s father, and his friends. That’s also when we catch a glimpse of Severus’ fondness for Lily, Harry’s mother.

        I can’t bear to imagine having this terrifying internal battle. Harry’s resemblance of his father made professor Snape despise him and make him suffer throughout the series, but he also felt responsible and eager to protect their whole family when the prophecy found its way to Lord Voldemort’s ears. And not only then – when he came to Dumbledore and begged him to protect him and that failed, he remained in Hogwarts as a permanent teacher, and protected Harry until the very end.

        4. He Is Flawed

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        04 HBP

          Although J.K Rowling described professor Snape’s appearance as a shadow that lurks in the dark, a powerful incarnation of magic, he is only human – and a flawed one for that matter. He’s not quite capable when it comes to showing facial expressions, except maybe when he’s expressing disgust at the sight of Harry, but he has very strong emotions that enabled him to visualize his goals and eventually accomplish them.

          This fact brought Severus’ character closer to me as a reader than anything else. As the HP series progressed, professor Snape gradually became a person, not someone untouchable, distant and inexplicable. He’s capable of love and hate, of bravery and patience, spitefulness on the other hand, but also being driven and determined, which kept him going the whole time.

          5. He Is Loyal

          05 The End

            Severus is not black or white, or necessarily good or evil. This is probably one of the greatest dilemmas I head with this layered character J.K Rowling so skillfully created; I was absolutely sure that Severus is unquestionably loyal – but I wasn’t sure where his loyalty lies.

            Before the series ended, there were so many different theories that could point to one or the other, and both sides had strong arguments that couldn’t be so easily disputed. Even now, when the Second Wizardry War at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry ended, there are still confronted sides about this issue.

            Nevertheless, this is my humble way to pay tribute to two great men, Severus Snape and Alan Rickman, who both left a great void in the Wizarding World. Both of them will have a special place in my heart – always.

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            Last Updated on February 11, 2021

            Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

            Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

            How often have you said something simple, only to have the person who you said this to misunderstand it or twist the meaning completely around? Nodding your head in affirmative? Then this means that you are being unclear in your communication.

            Communication should be simple, right? It’s all about two people or more talking and explaining something to the other. The problem lies in the talking itself, somehow we end up being unclear, and our words, attitude or even the way of talking becomes a barrier in communication, most of the times unknowingly. We give you six common barriers to communication, and how to get past them; for you to actually say what you mean, and or the other person to understand it as well…

            The 6 Walls You Need to Break Down to Make Communication Effective

            Think about it this way, a simple phrase like “what do you mean” can be said in many different ways and each different way would end up “communicating” something else entirely. Scream it at the other person, and the perception would be anger. Whisper this is someone’s ear and others may take it as if you were plotting something. Say it in another language, and no one gets what you mean at all, if they don’t speak it… This is what we mean when we say that talking or saying something that’s clear in your head, many not mean that you have successfully communicated it across to your intended audience – thus what you say and how, where and why you said it – at times become barriers to communication.[1]

            Perceptual Barrier

            The moment you say something in a confrontational, sarcastic, angry or emotional tone, you have set up perceptual barriers to communication. The other person or people to whom you are trying to communicate your point get the message that you are disinterested in what you are saying and sort of turn a deaf ear. In effect, you are yelling your point across to person who might as well be deaf![2]

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            The problem: When you have a tone that’s not particularly positive, a body language that denotes your own disinterest in the situation and let your own stereotypes and misgivings enter the conversation via the way you talk and gesture, the other person perceives what you saying an entirely different manner than say if you said the same while smiling and catching their gaze.

            The solution: Start the conversation on a positive note, and don’t let what you think color your tone, gestures of body language. Maintain eye contact with your audience, and smile openly and wholeheartedly…

            Attitudinal Barrier

            Some people, if you would excuse the language, are simply badass and in general are unable to form relationships or even a common point of communication with others, due to their habit of thinking to highly or too lowly of them. They basically have an attitude problem – since they hold themselves in high esteem, they are unable to form genuine lines of communication with anyone. The same is true if they think too little of themselves as well.[3]

            The problem: If anyone at work, or even in your family, tends to roam around with a superior air – anything they say is likely to be taken by you and the others with a pinch, or even a bag of salt. Simply because whenever they talk, the first thing to come out of it is their condescending attitude. And in case there’s someone with an inferiority complex, their incessant self-pity forms barriers to communication.

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            The solution: Use simple words and an encouraging smile to communicate effectively – and stick to constructive criticism, and not criticism because you are a perfectionist. If you see someone doing a good job, let them know, and disregard the thought that you could have done it better. It’s their job so measure them by industry standards and not your own.

            Language Barrier

            This is perhaps the commonest and the most inadvertent of barriers to communication. Using big words, too much of technical jargon or even using just the wrong language at the incorrect or inopportune time can lead to a loss or misinterpretation of communication. It may have sounded right in your head and to your ears as well, but if sounded gobbledygook to the others, the purpose is lost.

            The problem: Say you are trying to explain a process to the newbies and end up using every technical word and industry jargon that you knew – your communication has failed if the newbie understood zilch. You have to, without sounding patronizing, explain things to someone in the simplest language they understand instead of the most complex that you do.

            The solution: Simplify things for the other person to understand you, and understand it well. Think about it this way: if you are trying to explain something scientific to a child, you tone it down to their thinking capacity, without “dumbing” anything down in the process.[4]

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            Emotional Barrier

            Sometimes, we hesitate in opening our mouths, for fear of putting our foot in it! Other times, our emotional state is so fragile that we keep it and our lips zipped tightly together lest we explode. This is the time that our emotions become barriers to communication.[5]

            The problem: Say you had a fight at home and are on a slow boil, muttering, in your head, about the injustice of it all. At this time, you have to give someone a dressing down over their work performance. You are likely to transfer at least part of your angst to the conversation then, and talk about unfairness in general, leaving the other person stymied about what you actually meant!

            The solution: Remove your emotions and feelings to a personal space, and talk to the other person as you normally would. Treat any phobias or fears that you have and nip them in the bud so that they don’t become a problem. And remember, no one is perfect.

            Cultural Barrier

            Sometimes, being in an ever-shrinking world means that inadvertently, rules can make cultures clash and cultural clashes can turn into barriers to communication. The idea is to make your point across without hurting anyone’s cultural or religious sentiments.

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            The problem: There are so many ways culture clashes can happen during communication and with cultural clashes; it’s not always about ethnicity. A non-smoker may have problems with smokers taking breaks; an older boss may have issues with younger staff using the Internet too much.

            The solution: Communicate only what is necessary to get the point across – and eave your personal sentiments or feelings out of it. Try to be accommodative of the other’s viewpoint, and in case you still need to work it out, do it one to one, to avoid making a spectacle of the other person’s beliefs.[6]

            Gender Barrier

            Finally, it’s about Men from Mars and Women from Venus. Sometimes, men don’t understand women and women don’t get men – and this gender gap throws barriers in communication. Women tend to take conflict to their graves, literally, while men can move on instantly. Women rely on intuition, men on logic – so inherently, gender becomes a big block in successful communication.[7]

            The problem: A male boss may inadvertently rub his female subordinates the wrong way with anti-feminism innuendoes, or even have problems with women taking too many family leaves. Similarly, women sometimes let their emotions get the better of them, something a male audience can’t relate to.

            The solution: Talk to people like people – don’t think or classify them into genders and then talk accordingly. Don’t make comments or innuendos that are gender biased – you don’t have to come across as an MCP or as a bra-burning feminist either. Keep gender out of it.

            And remember, the key to successful communication is simply being open, making eye contact and smiling intermittently. The battle is usually half won when you say what you mean in simple, straightforward words and keep your emotions out of it.

            Reference

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