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8 Steps To Overcome Childhood Trauma

8 Steps To Overcome Childhood Trauma

“After a cruel childhood, one must reinvent oneself. Then re-imagine the world.” ― Mary Oliver

Children are fragile with emotions and despite they show resilience and ability to stand up against any situation more than adults do. However, some traumatic events during the childhood can leave long-lasting effects and negativity that can haunt in the adulthood, if not overcame.

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Anything can trigger a trauma during childhood. The disrupted sense of security, domestic violence, sexual and verbal abuse, mistreatment, bullying and separation from a parent are some of the most common ones. If you’re past as a child haunts you and you face several emotional and psychological problems, you can get over it. Here are 8 steps to overcome childhood trauma.

1. Acknowledge and recognize the trauma

Most people who face childhood trauma go through a lot of problems including the feeling of guilt, self-blame or so. However, people fail to try and acknowledge to minimize the trauma and even pretend that it did not happen, which hits them back. The best way to start healing is understanding that the event occurred and that you had no will to be a part of it.

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2. Seek support

Childhood trauma often leads to isolation and makes people and introvert. Many trauma survivors say that the best way to recover quickly is to seek support and talk to people. Connecting with different people will give ideas on different ways to heal and overcome the effect. Talk to your family members, or a close friend or join a support group so that you can speak to someone about the event and put off all of your frustrations.

3. Take care of your health and exercise

People who face trauma as a child build up unnecessary stress which creates a direct impact on health. A daily routine to keep oneself at rest by exercising and eating properly will keep you away from anxiety and make you fresh. Join a gym club and start sweating because the more you become physically and mentally strong, the more you get close to overcoming the impacts of a childhood trauma. Make sure that you choose the right protein and best creatine to build muscles the right way.

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4. Avoid alcohol and drugs

People who face trauma get depressed and the only gateway they think of is drugs or alcohol. However, the first thing to do is to refrain yourself from such harmful things and avoid them at any cost. If you’re already an addict, you need to start thinking of your future and join a rehab. Alcohol and drugs make people ill while it also adds up more stress in the future though they might provide temporary relief.

5. Reclaim control

When you become a victim of childhood trauma, your past will get control of your present and future. But, when you start reclaiming control over your thoughts and activities, you’re your own boss and you can shape your present and future the way you want it to be. As long as you’re willing to let go of the past, you’re in good shape. So, make sure you’re ready to battle your past and navigate through the sufferings that you went through.

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6. Be patient

When you’re hurt as a child, you develop intense feelings, lose control over your emotions and become hopeless. Healing takes time and you need to be patient with yourself. Take things step by step, one at a time and the little success you enjoy with the bits and pieces will help you overcome childhood trauma sooner.

7. Replace bad habits with good ones

Negativity is going to lead you nowhere. Bad habits will develop such negativity and develop a feeling of mistrusting others, doubting yourself or so. It’ll also keep you secluded. You need to give up on your bad habits and start replacing with good ones right away. If you smoke, quit it slow and it’ll help you relive the pain of the past. If it’s hard for you to let go of your bad habits, go to a therapist or seek help from people around you.

8. Accept it and move on

Learning the fact that you were a part of a trauma is surely hurting. But, when you accept something, it’s not that you need to embrace it throughout your life and go through all the pain and sufferings. Acceptance means that you’ve something to do with it and that you won’t let it ruin your life. You need to accept it and move on, try to move away from your bad memories and believe that there’s always light at the end of the tunnel.

Featured photo credit: jill111 via pixabay.com

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Grishma Giri

Content Creator and Strategist

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Last Updated on June 23, 2019

20 Things People Regret the Most Before They Die

20 Things People Regret the Most Before They Die

Close your eyes and imagine that you’re at your own funeral—a bit morbid I know, but there’s a reason for it. Now think about what you’d like people to say about you. What kind of a life do you want to lead? People die with all kinds of regrets. Don’t be one of them.

1. I wish I’d cared less about what other people think.

It’s only when you realise how little other people are really thinking of you (in a negative sense) that you realise how much time you spent caring and wasting energy worrying about this.

2. I wish I had accomplished more.

You don’t have to have won an Oscar, built up a business or run a marathon, but having small personal accomplishments is important.

3. I wish I had told __ how I truly felt.

Even if the “one” doesn’t exist, telling someone how you truly feel will always save you from that gut wrenching”but what if…” feeling that could linger for life if you stay quiet.

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4. I wish I had stood up for myself more.

Sometimes, it’s too easy to think that if you go all out to please everyone you’ll be liked more or your partner won’t run off with anyone else. I think age probably teaches us to be nice but not at the expense of our own happiness.

5. I wish I had followed my passion in life.

It’s so easy to be seduced by a stable salary, a solid routine and a comfortable life, but at what expense?

6. I wish our last conversation hadn’t been an argument.

Life is short, and you never really know when the last time you speak to someone you love will be. It’s these moments that really stay clear in peoples’ minds.

7. I wish I had let my children grow up to be who they wanted to be.

The realisation that love, compassion and empathy are so much more important than clashes in values or belief systems can hit home hard.

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8. I wish I had lived more in the moment.

Watching children grow up makes you realise how short-lived and precious time really is, and as we age, many of us live less and less in the present.

9. I wish I had worked less.

There’s always a desire to have loosened up a bit more with this one and the realisation that financial success or career accomplishment doesn’t necessarily equal a fulfilled life.

10. I wish I had traveled more.

It can be done at any age, with kids or not but many talk themselves out of it for all kinds of reasons such as lack of money, mortgage, children, etc. When there’s a regret, you know it could have been possible at some stage.

11. I wish I had trusted my gut rather than listening to everyone else.

Making your own decisions and feeling confident in the decisions you make gives us fulfilment and joy from life. Going against your gut only breeds resentment and bitterness.

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12. I wish I’d taken better care of myself.

Premature health problems or ageing always makes you wonder if you’d eaten healthier, exercised more and been less stressed, would you be where you are today?

13. I wish I’d taken more risks.

Everyone has their own idea of what’s risky, but you know when you’re living too much in your comfort zone. In hindsight, some people feel they missed out on a lot of adventure life has to offer.

14. I wish I’d had more time.

Many people say time speeds up as we age. The six weeks of summer holidays we had as kids certainly seemed to last a lifetime. If time speeds up, then it’s even more important to make the most of every moment.

15. I wish I hadn’t worried so much.

If you’ve ever kept a diary and looked back, you’ll probably wonder why you ever got so worked up over X.

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16. I wish I’d appreciated ___ more.

The consequences of taking people for granted are always hard to deal with.

17. I wish I’d spent more time with my family.

Some people get caught up with work, move to other parts of the world, grow old with grudges against family members only to realise their priorities were in the wrong place.

18. I wish I hadn’t taken myself so seriously.

Life is just more fun when you can laugh at yourself.

19. I wish I’d done more for other people.

Doing things for others just makes life more meaningful.

20. I wish I could have felt happier.

The realisation that happiness is a state of mind that you can control sometimes doesn’t occur to people until it’s too late.

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