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Things To Consider Before Buying Music Software

Things To Consider Before Buying Music Software

With the ride range of music software that is currently available, there are many options and features that have their strengths and weaknesses. Before you choose sequencing software you should think about the tasks that you want the software to perform. Will you likely be creating your own instrumentals and vocals, or will you need a lot of synthesized sounds and hooks? Different software is better for different types of music (such as dance, rock or pop). Budget is also a concern because some types of expensive software offer advanced features that cannot be found in more affordable music software packages.

Starting off

Starting your own home studio can be challenging and very costly. The major questions are “Where do I begin?” and “What do I need?” If you’re venturing into this territory as a beginner, these are valid questions. That’s why planning and budgeting is essential. You need to know the purpose of your home studio to draw up an action plan.

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The sequencer is the most basic form of digital music production because it enables the user to operate a synthesizer with MIDI commands. Most sequencing packages have options to produce high quality sounds, use of loops and samples, soft synths, and various audio effects. Some examples of popular sequencer software include Steinberg Cubase, and Apple Logic. Steinberg Cubase software allows for audio and MIDI editing and recording on both Apple Macbook and PCs. Apple Logic software comes only with the PC version, but has a wider range of sequencing features available.

How can I learn more about music production?

There is some excellent software on the market for those interested in developing their own music. In particular, Cubase tutorial will help you make that transition from a performer to a recording artist.

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Some digital music software takes sequencing a step further with the addition of studio-like software that mimics audio hardware. This includes the ability to produce entire songs with just one software program. These advanced sequencers usually have detailed interfaces that resemble the hardware found in most professional music studios. Propellerhead Reason is one example of an advanced sequencer featuring a user-friendly interface and a large library of sounds that can be added onto the on-board music library.

Audio editors are another piece of software used in digital audio studios. Audio editors are useful for cropping, removing unwanted noise, and adding various effects using a variety of audio formats. Sony Sound Forge is a popular audio editing and recording software application that is available in both lite and professional versions.

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Audio settlers are useful for playing back segments of audio. They can play selected audio back at different pitches to create filters and other sound effects for a track. While many of the features of digital samplers are similar to those of hardware samplers, electronic samplers tend to be more user-friendly than their hardware brethren. Native Instruments Kontakt is a popular electronic sampler that incorporates up to 5 different modes which enable the user to experience sampled playback, in addition to pitch shifting and drum looping options.

While most sequencing software comes with effects of their own, additional packages of filters and plugins can be bought as add-ons. This way, external software can be used as if it is part of the native software.

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Conclusion

The entire process of music production cannot be learned overnight. There will be a lot of things that you will discover and learn along the way. Your patience and determination will surely be tested, but eventually it will all pay off once you get to enjoy the beautiful music and sound elements that you are able to produce.

Featured photo credit: Music Software via lifehack.org

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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