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10 David Bowie Quotes You Should Remember

10 David Bowie Quotes You Should Remember

One of the finest musicians of all times, known as the master of reinvention, British singer David Bowie died at the age of 69 on January 10, 2016 after an 18-month battle with cancer. Known to be an extraordinary person with several hits like “Let’s Dance”, “Starman”, “Heroes”, “Rebel Rebel”, “Space Oddity”, “Life on Mars”, among others, Bowie released his latest album Blackstar, on his birthday and bid adieu to the world two days after.

Born David Robert Jones on January 8, 1947, David Bowie spent 48 years of his life in the entertainment industry where he worked as a songwriter, singer, producer, actor and style pioneer. Considered the Picasso of pop, Bowie was a restless artist and had a vision for innovation. After introducing his alter ego Ziggy Stardust, he gave pop music a new direction in 1972 and he truly was more than an eyeliner-wearing maverick. A fiercely forward-looking personality, Bowie made a huge impact with his powerful use drama, images and personas in his music while also teaching generations of musicians about how to achieve the same.

Bowie created his own style and was known for his significant feats of versatility. A jukebox of talent, understanding Bowie is often considered similar to looking through a kaleidoscope. Every time someone started to define his style, he’d come up with a song or an album right out of left field.

“Offstage I’m a robot. On stage, I achieve emotion. It’s probably why I prefer dressing up as Ziggy to being David,” said Bowie when he introduced his Ziggy Stardust persona.

Beyond all of his contributions to the musical industry, David Bowie was a man of good heart; simple, yet extraordinary and cool. A progressive composer, Bowie had an all-round personality and he even carved out a successful acting career with roles in movies like The Man Who Fell to Earth, Labyrinth, The Last Temptation of Christ, Cat People and The Hunger.

As the world of entertainment mourns the loss of a star, read through these 10 David Bowie quotes you should remember to pay tribute to the icon.

1. I don’t know where I’m going from here, but I promise it won’t be boring.

I'm going from here

    2. Make the best of every moment. We’re not evolving. We’re not going anywhere.

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    Make the best

      3. Tomorrow belongs to those who can hear it coming.

      Tomorrow

        4. You can neither win nor lose if you don’t run the race.

        race

          5. The truth is of course is that there is no journey. We are arriving and departing all at the same time.

          Journey

            6. I find only freedom in the realms of eccentricity.

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            Freedom

              7. I really like to understand the society that I’m living in and how it works and functions and what people are thinking. You know. You can’t be a writer in any other way, I think. You have to sort of know where you are to write.

              society

                8. I’m just an individual who doesn’t feel that I need to have somebody qualify my work in any particular way. I’m working for me.

                Individual

                  9. I’m an instant star. Just add water and stir.

                  Star

                    10. And these children that you spit on as they try to change their worlds are immune to your consultations. They’re quite aware of what they’re going through.

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                    Awareness

                      David Bowie always had a morphing persona and he was much decorated and adored by several popular musicians including Madonna and Lady Gaga. He was a legend, a star, a friend and a good human being. An artist who portrayed angst and apocalypse, paranoia and media culture all at the same time; he made distance and yearning his lifelong themes while he also had a strong desire to push cult interests into the limelight. An explorer of human impulses, this complexly androgynous personality was a standard-bearer for rock music and his name will always be plated in golden letters for the same reason.

                      Featured photo credit: Jimmy King for David Bowie via instagram.com

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                      Last Updated on October 15, 2019

                      Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

                      Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

                      Procrastination is very literally the opposite of productivity. To produce something is to pull it forward, while to procrastinate is to push it forward — to tomorrow, to next week, or ultimately to never.

                      Procrastination fills us with shame — we curse ourselves for our laziness, our inability to focus on the task at hand, our tendency to be easily led into easier and more immediate gratifications. And with good reason: for the most part, time spent procrastinating is time spent not doing things that are, in some way or other, important to us.

                      There is a positive side to procrastination, but it’s important not to confuse procrastination at its best with everyday garden-variety procrastination.

                      Sometimes — sometimes! — procrastination gives us the time we need to sort through a thorny issue or to generate ideas. In those rare instances, we should embrace procrastination — even as we push it away the rest of the time.

                      Why we procrastinate after all

                      We procrastinate for a number of reasons, some better than others. One reason we procrastinate is that, while we know what we want to do, we need time to let the ideas “ferment” before we are ready to sit down and put them into action.

                      Some might call this “creative faffing”; I call it, following copywriter Ray Del Savio’s lead, “concepting”.[1]

                      Whatever you choose to call it, it’s the time spent dreaming up what you want to say or do, weighing ideas in your mind, following false leads and tearing off on mental wild goose chases, and generally thinking things through.

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                      To the outside observer, concepting looks like… well, like nothing much at all. Maybe you’re leaning back in your chair, feet up, staring at the wall or ceiling, or laying in bed apparently dozing, or looking out over the skyline or feeding pigeons in the park or fiddling with the Japanese vinyl toys that stand watch over your desk.

                      If ideas are the lifeblood of your work, you have to make time for concepting, and you have to overcome the sensation— often overpowering in our work-obsessed culture — that faffing, however creative, is not work.

                      So, is procrastination bad?

                      Yes it is.

                      Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re “concepting” when in fact you’re just not sure what you’re supposed to be doing.

                      Spending an hour staring at the wall while thinking up the perfect tagline for a marketing campaign is creative faffing; staring at the wall for an hour because you don’t know how to come up with a tagline, or don’t know the product you’re marketing well enough to come up with one, is just wasting time.

                      Lack of definition is perhaps the biggest friend of your procrastination demons. When we’re not sure what to do — whether because we haven’t planned thoroughly enough, we haven’t specified the scope of what we hope to accomplish in the immediate present, or we lack important information, skills, or resources to get the job done.

                      It’s easy to get distracted or to trick ourselves into spinning our wheels doing nothing. It takes our mind off the uncomfortable sensation of failing to make progress on something important.

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                      The answer to this is in planning and scheduling. Rather than giving yourself an unspecified length of time to perform an unspecified task (“Let’s see, I guess I’ll work on that spreadsheet for a while”) give yourself a limited amount of time to work on a clearly defined task (“Now I’ll enter the figures from last months sales report into the spreadsheet for an hour”).

                      Giving yourself a deadline, even an artificial one, helps build a sense of urgency and also offers the promise of time to “screw around” later, once more important things are done.

                      For larger projects, planning plays a huge role in whether or not you’ll spend too much time procrastinating to reach the end reasonably quickly.

                      A good plan not only lists the steps you have to take to reach the end, but takes into account the resources, knowledge and inputs from other people you’re going to need to perform those steps.

                      Instead of futzing around doing nothing because you don’t have last month’s sales report, getting the report should be a step in the project.

                      Otherwise, you’ll spend time cooling your heels, justifying your lack of action as necessary: you aren’t wasting time because you want to, but because you have to.

                      How bad procrastination can be

                      Our mind can often trick us into procrastinating, often to the point that we don’t realize we’re procrastinating at all.

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                      After all, we have lots and lots of things to do; if we’re working on something, aren’t we being productive – even if the one big thing we need to work on doesn’t get done?

                      One way this plays out is that we scan our to-do list, skipping over the big challenging projects in favor of the short, easy projects. At the end of the day, we feel very productive: we’ve crossed twelve things off our list!

                      That big project we didn’t work on gets put onto the next day’s list, and when the same thing happens, it gets moved forward again. And again.

                      Big tasks often present us with the problem above – we aren’t sure what to do exactly, so we look for other ways to occupy ourselves.

                      In many cases too, big tasks aren’t really tasks at all; they’re aggregates of many smaller tasks. If something’s sitting on your list for a long time, each day getting skipped over in favor of more immediately doable tasks, it’s probably not very well thought out.

                      You’re actively resisting it because you don’t really know what it is. Try to break it down into a set of small tasks, something more like the tasks you are doing in place of the one big task you aren’t doing.

                      More consequences of procrastination can be found in this article:

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                      8 Dreadful Effects of Procrastination That Can Destroy Your Life

                      Procrastination, a technical failure

                      Procrastination is, more often than not, a sign of a technical failure, not a moral failure.

                      It’s not because we’re bad people that we procrastinate. Most times, procrastination serves as a symptom of something more fundamentally wrong with the tasks we’ve set ourselves.

                      It’s important to keep an eye on our procrastinating tendencies, to ask ourselves whenever we notice ourselves pushing things forward what it is about the task we’ve set ourselves that simply isn’t working for us.

                      Featured photo credit: chuttersnap via unsplash.com

                      Reference

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