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10 David Bowie Quotes You Should Remember

10 David Bowie Quotes You Should Remember

One of the finest musicians of all times, known as the master of reinvention, British singer David Bowie died at the age of 69 on January 10, 2016 after an 18-month battle with cancer. Known to be an extraordinary person with several hits like “Let’s Dance”, “Starman”, “Heroes”, “Rebel Rebel”, “Space Oddity”, “Life on Mars”, among others, Bowie released his latest album Blackstar, on his birthday and bid adieu to the world two days after.

Born David Robert Jones on January 8, 1947, David Bowie spent 48 years of his life in the entertainment industry where he worked as a songwriter, singer, producer, actor and style pioneer. Considered the Picasso of pop, Bowie was a restless artist and had a vision for innovation. After introducing his alter ego Ziggy Stardust, he gave pop music a new direction in 1972 and he truly was more than an eyeliner-wearing maverick. A fiercely forward-looking personality, Bowie made a huge impact with his powerful use drama, images and personas in his music while also teaching generations of musicians about how to achieve the same.

Bowie created his own style and was known for his significant feats of versatility. A jukebox of talent, understanding Bowie is often considered similar to looking through a kaleidoscope. Every time someone started to define his style, he’d come up with a song or an album right out of left field.

“Offstage I’m a robot. On stage, I achieve emotion. It’s probably why I prefer dressing up as Ziggy to being David,” said Bowie when he introduced his Ziggy Stardust persona.

Beyond all of his contributions to the musical industry, David Bowie was a man of good heart; simple, yet extraordinary and cool. A progressive composer, Bowie had an all-round personality and he even carved out a successful acting career with roles in movies like The Man Who Fell to Earth, Labyrinth, The Last Temptation of Christ, Cat People and The Hunger.

As the world of entertainment mourns the loss of a star, read through these 10 David Bowie quotes you should remember to pay tribute to the icon.

1. I don’t know where I’m going from here, but I promise it won’t be boring.

I'm going from here

    2. Make the best of every moment. We’re not evolving. We’re not going anywhere.

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    Make the best

      3. Tomorrow belongs to those who can hear it coming.

      Tomorrow

        4. You can neither win nor lose if you don’t run the race.

        race

          5. The truth is of course is that there is no journey. We are arriving and departing all at the same time.

          Journey

            6. I find only freedom in the realms of eccentricity.

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            Freedom

              7. I really like to understand the society that I’m living in and how it works and functions and what people are thinking. You know. You can’t be a writer in any other way, I think. You have to sort of know where you are to write.

              society

                8. I’m just an individual who doesn’t feel that I need to have somebody qualify my work in any particular way. I’m working for me.

                Individual

                  9. I’m an instant star. Just add water and stir.

                  Star

                    10. And these children that you spit on as they try to change their worlds are immune to your consultations. They’re quite aware of what they’re going through.

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                    Awareness

                      David Bowie always had a morphing persona and he was much decorated and adored by several popular musicians including Madonna and Lady Gaga. He was a legend, a star, a friend and a good human being. An artist who portrayed angst and apocalypse, paranoia and media culture all at the same time; he made distance and yearning his lifelong themes while he also had a strong desire to push cult interests into the limelight. An explorer of human impulses, this complexly androgynous personality was a standard-bearer for rock music and his name will always be plated in golden letters for the same reason.

                      Featured photo credit: Jimmy King for David Bowie via instagram.com

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                      Grishma Giri

                      Grishma Giri is a passionate writer who shares about lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

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                      Last Updated on November 12, 2020

                      5 Reasons Why Being a Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect

                      5 Reasons Why Being a Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect

                      As a perfectionist, do you spend a lot of time “perfecting” your work so that everything comes out the way you want it to?

                      I believe many of us are perfectionists in our own right. We set high bars for ourselves and put our best foot forward to achieve them. We dedicate copious amounts of attention and time to our work to maintain our high personal standards. Our passion for excellence drives us to run the extra mile, never stopping, never relenting.

                      Dedication towards perfection undoubtedly helps us to achieve great results. Yet, there is a hidden flip side to being perfectionists that we may not be aware of. Sure, being a perfectionist and having a keen eye for details help us improve and reach our goals. 

                      However, as ironic as it might sound, a high level of perfectionism prevents us from being our best as we begin to set unrealistic standards and let the fear of failure hold us back.

                      Below, we’ll go over some of the reasons why being a perfectionist may not be so perfect and how it can inhibit you from being the best version of yourself.

                      Why Perfectionism Isn’t So Perfect?

                      1. Less Efficiency

                      As a perfectionist, even when you are done with a task, you linger to find new things to improve on. This lingering process starts off as 10 minutes, then extends to 30 minutes, then to an hour, and more. We spend way more time on a task than is actually required.

                      In order to be truly efficient, we need to strike a balance between the best we could possibly do and the level of “good” a specific project requires. No one will expect perfection from you because it will ultimately be impossible to attain. Do the best you can in a reasonable time frame, and allow yourself to put it into the world.

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                      2. Less Effectiveness

                      We do little things because they seem like a “good addition” without consciously thinking about whether they’re really necessary. Sometimes, not only do the additions add no value, but they might even ruin things.

                      For example, over-cluttering a presentation with unneeded details can make it confusing for listeners. Jam-packing a blog layout with too many add-ons can make it less user friendly. Sometimes, consistency is key, and if you continuously change things, this will become much more difficult.

                      3. More Procrastination

                      Our desire to “perfect” everything makes us overcomplicate a project. What’s actually a simple task may get blown out of proportion to the extent that it becomes subconsciously intimidating. This makes us procrastinate on it, waiting for the ever “perfect” moment before we get to it. This “perfect” moment never strikes until it is too late.

                      Instead of overthinking it, set small objectives if you have a big project ahead of you. This will help you tackle it step-by-step and complete it before the deadline.

                      If you need help tackling procrastination, check out this article.

                      4. Missing the Bigger Picture

                      As a perfectionist, you get so hung up on details that you forget about the bigger picture and the end vision. It’s not uncommon to see better jobs done in pruning the trees than growing the forest.

                      Take a step back and remind yourself of your end goal. Try setting a timeline to help yourself stick to the work that needs to be done without ruminating on things that could be improved.

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                      5. Stressing Over Unfounded Problems

                      We anticipate problems before they crop up, and come up with solutions to address these problems. It becomes an obsession to pre-empt problems. As it turns out, most of these problems either never surface or don’t matter that much.

                      When Perfectionism Becomes a Problem

                      The problem isn’t perfectionism specifically. Perfectionism helps us to continuously strive for excellence and become better, so it can really be a good thing.The problem is when setting high standards turns into an obsession, so much so that the perfectionist becomes neurotic over gaining “perfection” and refuses to accept anything less than perfect. In the process, s/he misses the whole point altogether and does damage to their mental health. Such perfectionists can be known as “maladaptive perfectionists.”[1] Maladaptive perfectionists spend so much time setting high expectations and striving for perfection that they increase levels of depression and anxiety. 

                      Diagram showing how a healthy perfectionist and a maladaptive perfectionist respond to failure.

                        The answer isn’t to stop being a perfectionist or high achiever. It’s to be conscious of our perfectionist tendencies and manage them accordingly. We want to be healthy perfectionists who are truly achieving personal excellence, not maladaptive perfectionists who are sabotaging our own personal growth efforts[2].

                        How to Be a Healthy Perfectionist

                        1. Draw a Line

                        We have the 80/20 rule, where 80% of output can be achieved in 20% of time spent. We can spend all our time getting the 100% in, or we can draw the line where we get majority of the output, and start on a new project.

                        Obsessing over details is draining and tedious, and it doesn’t help us accomplish much. I used to review a blog post 3-4 times before I published. All the reviewing only amounted to subtle changes in phrasing and the occasional typos. It was extremely ineffective, so now I scan it once or twice and publish it.

                        2. Be Conscious of Trade-offs

                        When we spend time and energy on something, we deny ourselves the opportunity to spend the same time and energy on something else. There are tons of things we can do, and we need to be aware of the trade-offs involved, so we can better draw a line.

                        For example, if some unimportant blog admin work takes an hour, that’s an hour I could spend on content creation or blog promotion. Being conscious of this helps me make a better choice on how to spend my time.

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                        3. Get a View of the Big Picture

                        What is the end objective? What is the desired output? Is what you are doing leading you to the overall vision?

                        As a perfectionist, to make sure my attention is set on the end point, I have a monthly and weekly goal sheet my blog that keeps me on track. Every day, I refer to it to make sure what I’m doing contributes to the weekly goals, and ultimately the monthly goals to keep me on track.

                        4. Focus on Big Rocks

                        Big rocks are the important, high impact activities. Ask yourself if what you are doing makes any real impact. If not, stop working on it.

                        If it’s a small yes, deprioritize, delegate it to someone else, or get it done quickly. Seek out high impact tasks and spend time on them instead. Knowing the big picture helps you know the big rocks that contribute to the end goal.

                        5. Set a Time Limit

                        Parkinson’s Law

                        tells us work will take however long we want it to take. If you give yourself 4 hours, you will finish it in 4 hours. If you give yourself 3 hours, you will finish within 3 hours. If you don’t give yourself any time limit, you will take forever to do it.

                        Set the time limit and finish the task by then. There can be a million things you can do to improve it, but you have to draw the line somewhere.

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                        6. Be Okay With Mistakes

                        Part of the reason why a perfectionist obsesses over their work is because they want it to be mistake-free. However, trying to achieve 100% perfection is highly ineffective. If we’re busy perfecting this thing, we can’t get to other important things.

                        Realize that making mistakes is a trade off we have to embrace. The more we open ourselves to making mistakes, the faster we can get down to learning from them, and the quicker we can grow.

                        7. Realize Concerns Usually Amount to Nothing

                        It’s good to plan and prepare, but there comes a time when we should let things roll and deal with problems as they crop up. Being overly preemptive makes us live in an imaginary future versus in the present.

                        This doesn’t mean you don’t care. What it means that most of the things that do crop up can always be controlled on the spot, without worrying about them beforehand.

                        8. Take Breaks

                        If your productivity is waning, take a break. Resting and coming back to the same thing later on gives you a renewed perspective and fresh focus.

                        The Bottom Line

                        Perfectionism doesn’t have to be the enemy. If you’re a perfectionist, you can use it to help you be better at what you love to do. However, there’s a time and a place for it, and it’s important to learn strategies to start overcoming perfectionism when it becomes an obsession.

                        Instead of doing work perfectly, do your best and move on. This will help you go farther, faster.

                        More on Being Your Best

                        Featured photo credit: Elsa T. via unsplash.com

                        Reference

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