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Want To Master A Skill In 2016? Here Are 6 Websites To Use

Want To Master A Skill In 2016? Here Are 6 Websites To Use

The stepping stone from where you are today to where you want to be is simple: learning more skills. If we compare the differences between the people living an average lifestyle and successful, happier people, is that the latter have learned and leveraged more valuable skills in their lives.

Whether it’s learning how to invest your money, starting a business, or learning a language, the skills we learn not only makes us more valuable in the marketplace, but they give us the momentum to learn even more skills.

In 2016, let’s commit ourselves to learn at least one new valuable skill to take our careers, businesses, and lives to the next level.

Are you ready?

Here are 6 websites to get you started.

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1. CreativeLIVE

Skill: Photography, Entreprenuership, and Creativity

CreativeLIVE brings a unique business model, as they provide free live classes that anyone can tune into. Then, for those who are interested in keeping the course, they can purchase it.

Unlike SkillShare, CreativeLIVE focuses on solely bringing on top experts to share their knowledge. These include New York Times Best Selling Authors such as Tim Ferriss, Pulitzer Prize winners, and more. Their topics are also heavily focused on creative topics like photography, design, and branding.

2. Skillshare

Skill: Marketing, Design, and Branding

Skillshare is a learning community where you can learn anything from anyone. While they have classes from experts such as Seth Godin, Guy Kawasaki, and Gary Vaynerchuk, the majority of the courses are from local experts who have useful knowledge to share. Learn everything from branding, SEO, audience building, and more from anyone.

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They have a free community you can join and their premium plans start from $10/month.

3. Rype

Skill: Languages (Spanish)

As globalization rises, everything from business, media, and the economy will require interaction with foreign people outside of your language.

Learning how to speak a new language will give you a significant advantage over those who lack the knowledge, and it’s better to get started sooner than later. As a side benefit, language learning has been shown by numerous sources to increase your mental agility, memory retention, and decision-making skills.

Where to learn: You can get started with a free mobile app like Duolingo, or learn faster by using a personalized language learning website like Rype, which matches you with a native speaking teacher for private lessons online.

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4. Codeacademy

Skill: Coding

Codeacademy is a fun, simple, and gamified method of learning how to code, from HTML, CSS, Javascript, Ruby on Rails, and beyond. You can get started for free, and they will walk you through step-by-step to learn the basics of coding, while forcing you to practice on your own!

5. Toastmasters

Skill: Public Speaking

Warren Buffet has often claimed that the most valuable skill a recent graduate can learn is the art of public speaking.

Being a good communicator is massively understated and a crucial skill that can never be improved enough. Whether you’re going into a job interview, making a presentation, or starting a business, being a great speaker is what will make you stand out from the crowd and get your message across.

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Check out a local Toastmasters organization in your city and you can start to receive immediate feedback.

6. Investopedia University

Skill: Investing

Enjoy an abundance of detailed lessons on money management and investing. You can even set up a simulator stock portfolio on Investopedia, where you’ll get $100,000 of “fake” money to get some real-life practice before you start investing with your own hard-earned money.

Which of these websites will you use to learn a skill in 2016? Do you have any other helpful suggestions to share?

Share with your friends and family!

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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