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12 images that will change the way you see the world after viewing them

12 images that will change the way you see the world after viewing them

A picture speaks a thousand words. And some pictures can move you more than others. Below are some selections that can definitely rethink the meaning of life

The child playing violin in his teacher's funeral, whom helped him escape poverty and violence through music

child playing violin

    A Russian soldier playing an abandoned piano in Chechnya in 1994

    Solider playing piano

      Image credits: drugoi.livejournal.com

      Young man just found out his brother was killed

      Sad young man

        Image credits: Nhat V. Meyer

        A firefighter gives water to a koala

        Feeding koala

          Image credits: abc.net.au

          Solider reuniting with her daughter after her service

          reunite

            Image credits: Louie Favorite

            Man Falling from the World Trade Center on 9/11, or known as the “The Fallen Man”

            the fallen man

              Image credits:  Richard Drew /AP

              gypsy boy on New Year’s Eve 2006 in the gypsy community of St. Jacques, Perpignan, Southern France

              smoking kid

                Image credits: Jesco Denzel

                The dog “Leao” sits for a second consecutive day at the grave of her owner, who died in the disastrous landslides near Rio de Janiero in 2011

                the waiting dog

                  Image credits: Vanderlei Almeida / Getty Images

                  An old WW2 Russian tank veteran found the old tank in which he passed through the entire war

                  old man and the tank

                    Image credits: englishrussia.com

                    Flower power

                    flower power

                      Image credits: Bernie Boston

                      The Graves of a Catholic woman and her Protestant husband, Holland, 1888

                      stay together

                        Image credits: retronaut.com

                        Greg Cook hugs his dog Coco after finding her inside his destroyed home in Alabama

                        reunite with dog

                          Image credits: Gary Cosby Jr. / AP

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                          Last Updated on April 8, 2020

                          Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

                          Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

                          Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

                          Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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                          Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

                          However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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                          The leap happens when we realize two things:

                          1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
                          2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

                          Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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                          Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

                          My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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                          In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

                          “Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

                          Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

                          More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

                          Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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