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7 mind-blowing facts that sounds like BS, but are actually true

7 mind-blowing facts that sounds like BS, but are actually true

People always said life is like drama, and the reality sometimes fascinate you more than fictional stories. Below are a list of examples that proving the statement!

Chicago was artificially rised in 1860s

The city of Chicago was raised by several feet during the 1860s without disrupting daily life in order to solve the drainage problem. All the buildings, shopping centres, sidewalks and hotels were lifted up by jackscrews.

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A woman jumped off from the Empire State Building but blown back into the building

On December 2, 1979, Elvita Adams decided to take her life. She went to the observatory, which is on the 86th floor of Empire State Building and jumped. Yet a very strong wind blew her back into the building and she landed on a ledge on the 85th floor with a fractured hip only. The security guard  found her before she could make any other attempts.

Weight is big issue for F1 drivers

As heavier the driver is, more energy is needed for race cars to run. Hence weight is monitored closely for drivers of car racing, especially for F1. For example, team Red Bull once asked it’s driver, Daniel, Ricciardo to lose weight, whom weighed only 143 pounds.

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Parasite that becomes a tongue

There is a parasite named Cymothoa exigua. This parasite can destroy the tongue of a fish and then replaces the tongue for the rest of its lifespan, essentially transforming into a living, parasitic, but fully functioning and harmless tongue.

Tiger’s legs are so powerful that can remain standing even when dead

Tiger’s legs are so powerful, they can remain standing even when dead. Sometimes when tigers were shot, they bleed out and die while standing still.

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People are injecting deadly substance into their faces every year

The most deadly substance we’ve ever known is botulinum toxin. 100 nanograms of botulinum toxin is already enough to kill a fully grown up man; 1kg of it is enough to kill all living human.

Such substance causes muscle paralysis by cutting off proteins which normally enable vesicle function at the neuromuscular junction.

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Yet millions of people voluntarily injected it into their faces, under the name Botox®.

The song “Staying Alive” was used to train professionals to provide correct number of chest compression during CPR

The song has a consistent 104 beats per minute, which is close to the recommended compressions per minute needed for a CPR (the recommended compression rate is 100-120 compression per minute). According to a study conducted by the University of Illinois College of Medicine, the quality of CPR while listening to “Stayin’ Alive” was actually better than not listening to it.

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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Review Your Past Flow

Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

    Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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