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7 Mental Shifts This Man Had That Made Him A Success At 22

7 Mental Shifts This Man Had That Made Him A Success At 22

Tucker Hughes become a millionaire by the age of 22. He did that in the most competitive environment in the world. His average competitors had 10 times more experience in his field. Moreover, when he was only 20, he finished his master’s degree at very prestigious university, he had travelled to more than 50 countries around the world, completed 13 triathlons, and now lives a wonderful, fulfilled, happy life.

It may seem that everything was always perfect in this young man‘s life, however there was a period when the days weren’t so bright. After graduating from the school he started to venture into the family business of real estate. Early on, he realized if they would have any success it will be very hard. However, by being ambitious he did not get discouraged.

By being persistent and creative he achieved incredible results, he made millions of dollars from real estate commissions throughout the last year. Now you can Learn the 7 mental shifts that Tucker used to accelerate his success by such a young age.

1. Do Not Get Discouraged By Your Age

Instead of seeing yourself as too young for success, use your youth as the biggest asset. Believe that your youth is exactly what will bring you success, do not give yourself any excuses and do not wait for the next day, a certain month or a certain year.

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Accelerate your success right now, there will never be a perfect time. Make yourself a person with whom others wants to be around and network with. Become a young dedicated, hardworking professional.

2. Your Biggest Investment Is You. Consistently Keep Improving Yourself

The wisest investment is investing in yourself. Read every day, listen to positive programs that make your personal growth. Surround yourself with mentors and peers who are much more successful. Your number one priority in life is to keep learning and growing yourself. Work harder on yourself than on your work.

However, do not burn yourself out too much. Your health is everything, you must devote some time to relax and recreate your mental and physical powers. Go for a run, get a massage, give yourself some kind of luxurious gift, spoil and reward yourself after hard days.

3. Plan and Make Decisions Fast and Quickly

No matter how mentally prepared you are, there will be times when you will hit a threshold and you will get in a negative state where nothing happens. To prevent you from getting to that state often, make decisions as quickly as possible. Build a habit of planning and following through so that you can perform everything without thinking and being mentally drained. Tucker Hughes knows what he will wear for work and will eat next week. What about you?

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4.  Create a Habit of Deep Productive Focused Work

The only thing that stops you from explosive success and jumping out of mediocrity is the habit working productively many hours. Your deep concentrated focused hours is the most important factor of your success. However, keep in mind activity is not productivity. If you are really busy it does not mean it will bring you success. Focus and take massive action on activities that gives you results.

Tucker Hughes said that his success came from intentionally developing mental stamina. Without that he had no way to outperform business people who had decades of experience. Eliminate any distractions when working and keep aware when your focus is drifting. At the end of the day do an analysis of how you performed and be very vigorous on improving yourself daily.

5. Dream Boldly and Be More Ambitious

You must set goals for yourself. Every successful person has this exact trait in common. “If you don’t have 1-year, 5-year and 10-year goals for yourself do it right now” says Tucker.  Review them daily, consistently. First thing in the morning look at them.

Also, apply his other strategy, by asking yourself, “Could I achieve my 10 year goals this year?“. One of the character traits that Tucker Hughes has is that he pushes himself out of his comfort zone by slowing his timeline and creating an optimal path to his success.

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6. Use an Aggressive Campaign Method

Plan and execute. The fastest, easiest, simplest way to put your content in motion is to create a campaign of your promotions. Tucker‘s advice for you: “Reach out to your prospects in different ways and mediums every week for at least a month”. Be very aggressive and persistent. However, try to do this and not be annoying at the same time. Even if you are not in sales, it is still applicable in most endeavors to get your goal.

7. Have Faith

If you won’t believe in yourself you likely won’t make it. The good thing is you really have what it takes! There is nothing that can stop you from achieving your dreams except you.

Everyone who fails in life has their excuses. Be different.  Commit to excellence every day which is another trait of Tucker Hughes.

If you want to succeed , go out and get busy.

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The original article was published by the author http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/252726

 

Featured photo credit: I’m a little rocket ship by mugley via flickr.com

More by this author

Lukas Racas

Career, life coach

Top Success Lessons From The Best Personal Development Gurus 7 Mental Shifts This Man Had That Made Him A Success At 22

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Last Updated on September 30, 2019

How To Write Effective Meeting Minutes (with Examples)

How To Write Effective Meeting Minutes (with Examples)

Minutes are a written record of a board, company, or organizational meeting. Meeting minutes are considered a legal document, so when writing them, strive for clarity and consistency of tone.

Because minutes are a permanent record of the meeting, be sure to proofread them well before sending. It is a good idea to run them by a supervisor or seasoned attendee to make sure statements and information are accurately captured.

The best meeting minutes takers are careful listeners, quick typists, and are adequately familiar with the meeting topics and attendees. The note taker must have a firm enough grasp of the subject matter to be able to separate the important points from the noise in what can be long, drawn-out discussions. And, importantly, the note taker should not simultaneously lead and take notes. (If you’re ever asked to do so, decline.)

Following, are some step-by-step hints to effectively write meeting minutes:

1. Develop an Agenda

Work with the Chairperson or Board President to develop a detailed agenda.

Meetings occur for a reason, and the issues to be addressed and decided upon need to be listed to alert attendees. Work with the convener to draft an agenda that assigns times to each topic to keep the meeting moving and to make sure the group has enough time to consider all items.

The agenda will serve as your outline for the meeting minutes. Keep the minutes’ headings consistent with the agenda topics for continuity.

2. Follow a Template from Former Minutes Taken

If you are new to a Board or organization, and are writing minutes for the first time, ask to see the past meeting minutes so that you can maintain the same format.

Generally, the organization name or the name of the group that is meeting goes at the top: “Meeting of the Board of Directors of XYZ,” with the date on the next line. After the date, include both the time the meeting came to order and the time the meeting ended.

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Most groups who meet do so regularly, with set agenda items at each meeting. Some groups include a Next Steps heading at the end of the minutes that lists projects to follow up on and assigns responsibility.

A template from a former meeting will also help determine whether or not the group records if a quorum was met, and other items specific to the organization’s meeting minutes.

3. Record Attendance

On most boards, the Board Secretary is the person responsible for taking the meeting minutes. In organizational meetings, the minutes taker may be a project coordinator or assistant to a manager or CEO. She or he should arrive a few minutes before the meeting begins and pass around an attendance sheet with all members’ names and contact information.

Meeting attendees will need to check off their names and make edits to any changes in their information. This will help as both a back-up document of attendees and ensure that information goes out to the most up-to-date email addresses.

All attendees’ names should be listed directly below the meeting name and date, under a subheading that says “Present.” List first and last names of all attendees, along with title or affiliation, separated by a comma or semi-colon.

If a member of the Board could not attend the meeting, cite his or her name after the phrase: “Copied To:” There may be other designations in the participants’ list. For example, if several of the meeting attendees are members of the staff while everyone else is a volunteer, you may want to write (Staff) after each staff member.

As a general rule, attendees are listed alphabetically by their last names. However, in some organizations, it’s a best practice to list the leadership of the Board first. In that case, the President or Co-Presidents would be listed first, followed by the Vice President, followed by the Secretary, and then by the Treasurer. Then all other names of attendees would be alphabetized by last name.

It is also common practice to note if a participant joined the meeting via conference call. This can be indicated by writing: “By Phone” and listing the participants who called in.

4. Naming Convention

Generally, the first time someone speaks in the meeting will include his or her name and often the title.

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For example, “President of the XYZ Board, Roger McGowan, called the meeting to order.” The next time Roger McGowan speaks, though, you can simply refer to him as “Roger.” If there are two Rogers in the meeting, use an initial for their last names to separate the two. “Roger M. called for a vote. Roger T. abstained.”

5. What, and What Not, to Include

Depending on the nature of the meeting, it could last from one to several hours. The attendees will be asked to review and then approve the meeting minutes. Therefore, you don’t want the minutes to extend into a lengthy document.

Capturing everything that people say verbatim is not only unnecessary, but annoying to reviewers.

For each agenda item, you ultimately want to summarize only the relevant points of the discussion along with any decisions made. After the meeting, cull through your notes, making sure to edit out any circular or repetitive arguments and only leave in the relevant points made.

6. Maintain a Neutral Tone

Minutes are a legal document. They are used to establish an organization’s historical record of activity. It is essential to maintain an even, professional tone. Never put inflammatory language in the minutes, even if the language of the meeting becomes heated.

You want to record the gist of the discussion objectively, which means mentioning the key points covered without assigning blame. For example, “The staff addressed board members’ questions regarding the vendor’s professionalism.”

Picture a lawyer ten years down the road reading the minutes to find evidence of potential wrongdoing. You wouldn’t want an embellishment in the form of a colorful adverb or a quip to cloud any account of what took place. Here’s a list of neutral sounding words to get started with.

7. Record Votes

The primary purpose of minutes is to record any votes a board or organization takes. Solid record-keeping requires mentioning which participant makes a motion — and what the motion states verbatim — and which participant seconds the motion.

For example, “Vice President Cindy Jacobsen made a motion to dedicate 50 percent, or $50,000, of the proceeds from the ZZZ Foundation gift to the CCC scholarship fund. President Roger McGowan seconded the motion.”

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This vote tabulation should be expressed in neutral language as well. “The Board voted unanimously to amend the charter in the following way,” or “The decision to provide $1,000 to the tree-planting effort passed 4 to 1, with Board President McGowan opposing.”

Most Boards try to get a vote passed unanimously. Sometimes in order to help the Board attain a more cohesive outcome, a Board member may abstain from voting. “The motion passed 17 to 1 with one absension.”

8. Pare down Notes Post-Meeting

Following the meeting, read through your notes while all the discussions remain fresh in your mind, and make any needed revisions. Then, pare the meeting minutes down to their essentials, providing a brief account of the discussion that summarizes arguments made for and against a decision.

People often speak colloquially or in idioms, as in: “This isn’t even in the ballpark” or “You’re beginning to sound like a broken record.” While you may be tempted to keep the exact language in the minutes to add color, resist.

Additionally, if any presentations are part of the meeting, do not include information from the Powerpoint in the minutes. However, you will want to record the key points from the post-presentation discussion.

9. Proofread with Care

Make sure that you spelled all names correctly, inserted the correct date of the meeting, and that your minutes read clearly.

Spell out acronyms the first time they’re used. Remember that the notes may be reviewed by others for whom the acronyms are unfamiliar. Stay consistent in headings, punctuation, and formatting. The minutes should be polished and professional.

10. Distribute Broadly

Once approved, email minutes to the full board — not just the attendees — for review. Your minutes will help keep those who were absent apprised of important actions and decisions.

At the start of the next meeting, call for the approval of the minutes. Note any revisions. Try to work out the agreed-upon changes in the meeting, so that you don’t spend a huge amount of time on revisions.

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Ask for a motion to approve the minutes with the agreed-upon changes. Once an attendee offers a motion, ask for another person in the meeting to “second” the motion. They say, “All approved.” Always ask if there is anyone who does not approve. Assuming not, then say: “The minutes from our last meeting are approved once the agreed-upon changes have been made.”

11. File Meticulously

Since minutes are a legal document, take care when filing them. Make sure the file name of the document is consistent with the file names of previously filed minutes.

Occasionally, members of the organization may want to review past minutes. Know where the minutes are filed!

One Caveat

In this day and age of high technology, you may ask yourself: Wouldn’t it be simpler to record the meeting? This depends on the protocols of the organization, but probably not.

Be sure to ask what the rules are at the organization where you are taking minutes. Remember that the minutes are a record of what was done at the meeting, not what was said at the meeting.

The minutes reflect decisions not discussions. In spite of their name, “minutes,” the minutes are not a minute-by-minute transcript.

Bottom Line

Becoming an expert minutes-taker requires a keen ear, a willingness to learn, and some practice, but by following these tips you will soon become proficient.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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