Advertising
Advertising

How to Protect Your Computer From Power Surges

How to Protect Your Computer From Power Surges

Do you have a lot of information stored in your computer? If you’re like most people, I’m sure you have a ton of important documents, records and sensitive information saved on your hard drive. If your computer breaks down, a lot of vital information will be lost. We’re here to make sure that doesn’t happen, and the best way to do that is to talk about one of the major causes of computer malfunction: power surges.

What is a power surge exactly?

According to HowStuffWorks, “Power surges occur when something boosts the electrical charge at some point in the power lines. This causes an increase in the electrical potential energy, which can increase the current flowing to your wall outlet.”

What causes this?

Advertising

PowerHouse explains that there are two kinds of power surges, internal and external.

Internal Power Surges

More than half of household power surges are internal. These happen dozens of times of day, usually when devices with motors start up or shut off, diverting electricity to and from other appliances. Refrigerators and air conditioners are the biggest culprits, but smaller devices like hair dryers and power tools can also cause problems.

External Power Surges

An external power surge, stemming from outside your home, is most commonly caused by a tree limb touching a power line, lightning striking utility equipment or a small animal getting into a transformer. Surges can also occur when the power comes back on after an outage, and can even come into your home through telephone and cable TV lines.”

Advertising

Now that we know what causes this, what do we do to protect our devices from power surges?

How do we protect our devices?

In order to protect our devices, there are surge protectors available in the market today. The inexpensive option is to buy a surge suppressor. This tool is used as an outlet to connect your devices, but unlike a regular outlet, it helps guard the connected devices from power spikes or lightning surges. It helps limit voltage and blocks or shortens unwanted voltage, keeping your computers away from power surges. This typically costs around $20–$50 dollars depending on the brand and the number of outlets.

If you’d like a more heavy-duty power surge protector, you could get yourself an Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS). This keeps your device running even after the power has gone out so not only does it protect your device from power surges, it also give you ample time to save your work and shut down your computer properly. A typical UPS device can make your computer last for up to 5 minutes, some promising even 10 minutes. Although this is the most expensive option, with units selling for up to $180, it would greatly help in protecting your work and your devices too. It’s a small investment that could save you from potential breakdowns and computer data loss.

Advertising

If you simply do not want to have to purchase any of these, then the best way to protect your laptop or computer is to do the basic: unplug it from the socket when it is not in use.

What happens if my laptop is already affected by a Power Surge?

Laptop won’t turn on? Is your computer suddenly slow? Is your PC’s monitor flickering? Chances are, your laptop or computer was affected by a power surge and you didn’t even know it. Joel Lee of MakeUseOf says “Operating systems are complex and they must go through a “shutdown sequence” to make sure all running processes have correctly terminated before powering off. A sudden loss of electricity can interrupt important threads and leave your computer in an inoperable state.” This is the one thing we wouldn’t want to happen to our laptop or computer.

Now that you’re knowledgeable about the pitfalls of power surges and its effects on your electronic devices, get your gadgets protected!

Advertising

How about you? Have you ever experienced a power surge affecting one of your gadgets? Let us know your story. If you are like me who does not have time to purchase surge protectors, have your laptop or personal computer insured—not only are you protected from power surges, but in case your laptop or computer breaks for other reasons, your insurance can take care of replacing it.

More by this author

How to Protect Your Computer From Power Surges

Trending in Product & Gadget

1 Check Out These 5 Air Purifiers If You Want Your Home Smelling Fresh 2 Never Fall Asleep On The Wheel Again 3 Misplaced Your Items? Get This Search Party 4 8 Important Factors of Website Development and Designing 5 7 of the Best Marketplaces for Website Flipping

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on October 15, 2019

To Automate or not to Automate Your Personal Productivity System

To Automate or not to Automate Your Personal Productivity System

We are all about doing things faster and better around here at Lifehack. And part of doing things faster and better is having a solid personal productivity system that you use on a daily basis.

This system can be just about anything that helps you get through your mountain of projects or tasks, and helps you get closer to your goals in life. Whether it’s paper or pixels, it doesn’t really matter. But, since you are reading Lifehack I have to assume that pixels and technological devices are an important part of your workflow.

“Personal Productivity System” defined

A personal productivity system (at least the definition that this article will use) is a set of workflows and tools that allow an individual to optimally get their work done.

Workflows can be how you import and handle your photos from your camera, how you write and create blog posts, how you deploy compiled code to a server, etc.

Advertising

Tools are the things like planners, todo managers, calendars, development environments, applications, etc.

When automation is bad

You may be thinking that the more that we automate our systems, the more we will get done. This is mostly the case, but there is one very big “gotcha” when it comes to automation of anything.

Automation is a bad thing for your personal productivity system when you don’t inherently understand the process of something.

Let’s take paying your bills for example. This may seem very obvious, but if you can’t stick to a monthly budget and have trouble finding the money to make payments on time, then automating your bill payment every month is completely useless and can be dangerous for your personal finances.

Advertising

Another example is using a productivity tool to “tell you” what tasks are important and what to do next. If you haven’t taken a step back and figured out just how your productivity systems should work together, this type of automation will likely keep you from getting things done.

You can only automate something in your personal productivity system that have managed for a while. If you try to automate things that aren’t managed well already, you will probably feel a bit out of control and have a greater sense of overwhelm.

Another thing to remember is that some things should always be done by yourself, like responding to important emails and communicating with others. Automating these things can show your coworkers and colleagues that you don’t care enough to communicate yourself.

When automation is good

On the other hand, automation is a great thing for your personal productivity system when you understand the process of something and can then automatically get the steps done. When you know how to manage something effectively and understand the step-by-step process of a portion of your system, it’s probably a great time to automate it.

Advertising

I have several workflows that I have introduced in the last year that takes some of the “mindless” work from me so I can be more creative and not have to worry about the details of something.

On my Mac I use a combination of Automator workflows, TextExpander snippets, and now Keyboard Maestro shortcuts to do things like automatically touch-up photos imported from my iPhone 4S or open all the apps and websites needed for a weekly meeting to the forefront of my desktop by typing a few keys. Once you open yourself up to automating a few of your processes, you start to see other pieces of your system that can benefit from automation.

Once again; none of this works unless you understand your processes and know what tools you can use to get them done automatically.

The three steps to determine if something is “ripe” for automation

If your workflow passes these three steps, then automate away, baby:

Advertising

  1. You can do this process in your sleep and it doesn’t require your full, if any form of attention. It can (and has been) managed in some form prior to automating it.
  2. The process is time consuming.
  3. The process doesn’t require “human finesse” (ie. communicating and responding to something personally)

Automating your personal productivity systems can be a great for you in the long run if you are careful and mindful of what you are doing. You first need to understand the processes that you are trying to automate before automating them though. Don’t get stuck in thinking that anything and everything should be automated in your life, because it probably shouldn’t.

Pick and choose these processes wisely and you’ll find the ones that take up most of your time to be the best ones to automate. What have you automated in your personal productivity system?

Featured photo credit: Bram Naus via unsplash.com

Read Next