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Pregnancy At Week 10

Pregnancy At Week 10

Weighing in at less than a quarter of an ounce and marginally over an inch in height, the precious life in your womb is now ten weeks old. Congratulations!

Your pregnancy week 10 progress

You have just entered what is commonly referred to as the fetal period. Your baby is now swallowing fluid and becoming active with a noticeable amount of kicking. Tissues and organs in your baby’s body are going to begin developing at an accelerated rate. Kidneys, intestines, brain, and liver are now producing red blood cells, replacing the disappearing yolk sac, and are functioning although they still have a lot of growing to do throughout your pregnancy.

Tiny nails and defined fingers and toes are emerging where there was once webbing in between each digit. Also, soft hair like that of a peach is growing on your baby’s body at this point.

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Here are a few other development facts:

  • Limbs can now bend.
  • The contour of the spine is visible through translucent skin.
  • Spinal nerves are spreading away from the spinal cord.
  • The forehead is in a temporary state of bulging facilitating the forming brain, which sits high on his head measuring half his body’s length.
  • Within only a few more weeks your baby’s measurements will more than double.

10 week baby

    Your changes to anticipate

    Now that you have reached pregnancy week 10, at your next doctor visit you will likely be able to hear your baby’s heartbeat for the first time. Using a Doppler stethoscope (an ultrasound device), your doctor will place the device on your belly and make audible the rapid beating of your baby’s heart. Similar to the sound of a horse galloping, this special moment, is the first out-of-body moment you will share with your baby.

    You will want to consider maternity wear near this point. Your uterus was the size of a small pear before you became pregnant and it is now the size of a grapefruit. Among slight weight gain, bloating, and tender breasts, maternity wear options are a case-by-case situation and what is most important is for you to be happy and comfortable, which will mean your baby is happy and comfortable.

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    Exercise at this point is not very restrictive but it is a good idea to ask your doctor about the right physical activities to participate in. Swimming and walking are most recommended throughout the pregnancy and these are the benefits you will receive for staying active. Exercise sharpens muscle tone, builds strength, and boosts endurance. These three positive attributes will contribute to dealing with having to carry the extra weight you gain, they will reduce the physical stress of labor, and they will ease the transition of getting back to the exercise routines you practiced prior to becoming pregnant.

    Your pregnancy week 10 tips

    Something to consider at this point is the possibility of infections throughout your pregnancy. Urinary tract infections are the most frequently recorded bacterial infections in pregnant women. Higher than usual levels of progesterone work against your body’s hormone balance by relaxing your urinary tract. This results in slow urine flow and allows bacteria more time to grow.

    Intestinal bacteria moving from your rectum to your urethra travel up to your urinary tract and continue to grow. This can lead to a bladder infection called cystisis. Symptoms of this condition include discomfort, a burning sensation when urinating, the need to urinate more often, and lower abdominal pain.

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    Inform your doctor if you are experiencing any of these symptoms. Not treating cystisis may lead to a kidney infection and other complications, which could potentially lead to preterm labor. Antibiotics will likely be prescribed and will begin relieving your symptoms within mere days. It is important to complete all of the prescribed antibiotics even if symptoms disappear before completion.

    There is also a urinary tract condition called asymptomatic bacteriuria. This infection exhibits no symptoms in 50% of pregnant women. You are tested for this condition at your first doctor’s visit via a urine sample and it is also treated with antibiotics.

    Two more conditions to be aware of are bacterial vaginosis and common yeast infections.

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    The genital tract infection bacterial vaginosis may also be symptom free. If you do have symptoms they will include a thin and light colored discharge with a foul smell and possible irritation near your vagina and vulva. This condition may also lead to preterm labor or even preterm rupture of the amniotic membranes surrounding your baby.

    Yeast infections are common in pregnant women and are actually more likely to occur in pregnant women. Microscopic fungi in the Candida family are found in nearly one third of all women and increased estrogen levels attributed to pregnancy increase the fungal growth and yeast, which overwhelms competing microorganisms and leads to the infection. A yeast infection will not harm your developing baby and nor will it pose a serious threat on your baby if the infection is present during labor. Passing through the birth canal, your baby will likely contract a common infection referred to as thrush, which is identified by white patches in your baby’s mouth. This is a common, mild, and easily treated infection.

    Featured photo credit: 9 weeks pregnant via americanpregnancy.org

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    Published on February 11, 2021

    3 Positive Discipline Strategies That Are Best For Your Child

    3 Positive Discipline Strategies That Are Best For Your Child

    I’m old enough to remember how the cane at school was used for punishment. My dad is old enough to think that banning corporal punishment in schools resulted in today’s poorly disciplined youth. With all of this as my early experiences, there was a time when I would have been better assigned to write about how to negatively discipline your child.

    What changed? Thankfully, my wife showed me different approaches for discipline that were very positive. Plus, I was open to learning.

    What has not changed is that kids are full of problems with impulses and emotions that flip from sad to happy, then angry in a moment. Though we’re not that different as adults with stress, anxiety, lack of sleep, and stimulants such as sugar and caffeine in our diets.

    Punishment as Discipline?

    What this means is that we usually take the easy path when a child misbehaves and punish them. Punishment may solve an isolated problem, but it’s not really teaching the kids anything useful in the long term.

    Probably it’s time for me to be clear about what I mean by punishment and discipline as these terms are often used interchangeably, but they are quite different.

    Discipline VS. Punishment

    Punishment is where we inflict pain or suffering on our child as a penalty. Discipline means to teach. They’re quite the opposite, but you’ll notice that teachers, parents, and coaches often confuse the two words.

    So, as parents, we have to have clear goals to teach our kids. It’s a long-term plan—using strategies that will have the longest-lasting impact on our kids are the best use of our time and energy.

    If you’re clear about what you want to achieve, then it becomes easier to find the best strategy. The better we are at responding when our kids misbehave or do not follow our guidance, the better the results are going to be.

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    3 Positive Discipline Strategies for Your Child

    Stay with me as I appreciate that a lot of people who read these blogs do not always have children with impulse control. We’ve had a lot of kids in our martial arts classes that were the complete opposite. They had concentration issues, hyperactive, and disruptive to the other children.

    The easy solution is to punish their parents by removing the kids from the class or punish the child with penalties such as time outs and burpees. Yes, it was tempting to do all of this, but one of our club values is that we pull you up rather than push you down.

    This means it’s a long-term gain to build trust and confidence, which is destroyed by constant punishments.

    Here are the discipline strategies we used to build trust and confidence with these hyperactive kids.

    1. Patience

    The first positive discipline strategy is to simply be patient. The more patient you are, the more likely you are to get results. Remember I said that we need to build trust and connection. You’ll get further with this goal using patience.

    As a coach, sometimes I was not the best person for this role, but we had other coaches in the club that could step in here. As a parent, you may not have this luxury, so it’s really important to recognize any improvements that you see and celebrate them.

    2. Redirection

    The second strategy we use is redirection. It’s important with a redirection to take “no” out of the equation. Choices are a great alternative.

    Imagine a scenario where you’re in a restaurant and your kid is wailing. The hard part here is getting your child to stop screaming long enough for you to build a connection. Most parents have calming strategies and if you practice them with your child, they are more likely to be effective.

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    In the first moment of calm, you can say “Your choice to scream and cry in public is not a good one. It would be best to say, Dad. What can I do to get ice-cream?” You can replace this with an appropriate option.

    The challenge with being calm and redirecting is that we need to be clear-minded, focused, and really engaged at the moment. If you’re on your phone, talking with friends or family, thinking about work or the bills, you’ll miss this opportunity to discipline in a way that has long-term benefits.

    3. Repair and Ground Rules

    The third positive discipline strategy is to repair and use ground rules. Once you’ve given the better option and it has been taken, you have a chance to repair this behavior to lessen its occurrence to better yet, prevent it from happening again. And by setting appropriate ground rules, you can make this a long-term win by helping your child improve their behavior.

    It’s these ground rules that help you correct the poor choices of your child and direct the behavior that you want to see.

    Consequences Versus Ultimatums

    When I was a child and being punished. My parents worked in a busy business for long hours, so their default was to go to ultimatums. “Do that again and you’re grounded for a week,” or “If I catch you doing X, you’ll go to bed without dinner”.

    Looking back, this worked to a point. But the flip side is that I remembered more of the ultimatums than the happier times. I’ve learned through trial and error with my own kids that consequences are more effective while not breaking down trust.

    What to Do When Ground Rules Get Broken?

    It’s on the consequences that you use when the ground rules are broken.

    In the martial arts class, when the hyperactive student breaks the ground rules. They would miss a turn in a game or go to the back of the line in a queue. We do not want to shame the child by isolating them. But on the flip side, there should be clear ground rules and proportionate consequences.

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    Yes, there are times when we would like to exclude the student from the class, the club, and even the universe. Again, it’s here that patience is so important and probably impulse control too. With an attainable consequence, you can maintain trust and you’re more likely to get the long-term behavior that you’re looking to achieve.

    Interestingly, we would occasionally hear a strategy from parents that little Kevin has been misbehaving at home with his sister or something similar. He likes martial arts training, so the parent would react by removing Kevin from the martial arts class as a punishment.

    We would suggest that this would remove Kevin from an environment where he is behaving positively. Removing him from this is likely to be detrimental to the change you would like to see. He may even feel shame when he returns to the class and loses all the progress he’s made.

    Alternatives to Punishment

    Another option is to tell Kevin to write a letter to his sister, apologizing for his behavior, and explaining how he is going to behave in the future.

    If your child is too young to write, give the apology face to face. For the apology to feel sincere, there is some value to pre-framing or practicing this between yourself and your child before they give it to the intended person.

    Don’t expect them to know the ground rules or what you’re thinking! It will be clearer to your child and better received with some practice. You can practice along the lines of: “X is the behavior I did, Y is what I should have done, and Z is my promise to you for how I’m going to act in the future.” You can replace XYZ with the appropriate actions.

    It does not need to be a letter or in person, it can even be a video. But there has to be an intention to repair the broken ground rule. If you try these strategies, that is become fully engaged with them and you’re still getting nowhere.

    But what to do if these strategies do not work? Then there is plenty to gain by seeking the help of an expert. Chances are that something is interfering or limiting their development.

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    This does not mean that your child has a neurological deficiency, although this may be the root cause. But it means that you can get an objective view and help on how to create the changes that you would like to see. Remember that using positive discipline strategies is better than mere punishment.

    There are groups that you can chat with for help. Family Lives UK has the aim of ensuring that all parents have somewhere to turn before they reached a crisis point. The NSPCC also provides a useful guide to positive parenting that you can download.[1]

    Bottom Line

    So, there your go, the three takeaways on strategies you can use for positively disciplining your child. The first one is about you! Be patient, be present, and think about what is best for the long term. AKA, avoid ultimatums and punishment. The second is to use a redirect, then repair and repeat (ground rules) as your 3-step method of discipline.

    Using these positive discipline strategies require you to be fully engaged with your child. Again, being impulsive breaks trust and you lose some of the gains you’ve both worked hard to achieve.

    Lastly, consequences are better than punishment. Plus, avoid shaming, especially in public at all costs.

    I hope this blog has been useful, and remember that you should be more focused on repairing bad behavior because being proactive and encouraging good behavior with rewards, fun, and positive emotions takes less effort than repairing the bad.

    More Tips on How To Discipline Your Child

    Featured photo credit: Leo Rivas via unsplash.com

    Reference

    [1] NSPCC Learning: Positive parenting

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