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5 Careers You Wish You Had

5 Careers You Wish You Had

If you spend 40 hours a week in a cubicle, completing mindless tasks assigned to you by five different bosses, chances are you’ve found yourself lost in a daydream in which you had a more exciting and well-paying career.

While the jobs on this list aren’t without their drawbacks, they definitely will appeal to those who have found themselves wasting their lives in the seemingly meaningless rat race of modern society. But, before you stand up from your desk and tell your boss you’re quitting to become a world-famous ice cream taster, sit back down and realize the reason these jobs are so lucrative is because not everyone is cut out for them. But that doesn’t mean you can’t aim high, right?

1. Pro Video Gamer

Every seven-year-old boy’s dream is to get paid to play video games for a living. What used to be a silly and naive entry in a first grader’s journal is now more realistic than ever. But being good enough at playing video games to make a living from it isn’t as easy as you might think.

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Sure, you might have been the best Mortal Kombat player in your neighborhood growing up, but to win international competitions you have to be the best in the entire world. Sure, anyone can start up a YouTube or Twitch account and stream their gameplay, but only those with the perfect combination of skills, entertainment value, and marketing savvy will end up making millions. Maybe it’s best that gaming strictly remains a hobby.

2. Instagram Model

It’s never been easier for prospective models to put their name and face out there for others to notice — but this is a double-edged sword. Because it’s so easy for hopeful models to put themselves out there, it’s much more difficult to stand out in the crowd. However, for those that do make it, they make it big.

Some of the most popular Instagram models get paid thousands for taking a picture of themselves in a natural setting wearing a designer’s t-shirt and jeans. Not only do they get paid well, but since the pictures are potentially seen by millions, the models often are able to draw more traffic to their blog or other product, allowing them to start their own business in turn. Not a bad way to get a following!

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3. Ice Cream Taster

Another one of those cute little pipe dreams we’ve all had as children, ice cream tasters do exist in the real world. But they aren’t just some jolly fat guys sitting on thrones while workers bring them gallons of the sweet stuff to shovel into their mouths.

Ice cream tasters need to have a strong background in food science, usually equating to some type of chemistry degree. They have to be able to pinpoint exactly what tastes great about a specific ice cream, and what could be improved. If you’ve ever read a review of a wine or craft beer talking about “hints” and “notes,” thinking your review would simply be “It’s great!” or “It’s terrible!”, you already know how difficult such a task is.

However, for their troubles, some of the most critically acclaimed ice cream tasters can make around $100,000 a year. Not bad for being the first to taste Ben & Jerry’s newest quirky flavor!

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4. Pro Golf Caddy

Okay, so maybe your childhood dreams of becoming a professional athlete fell by the wayside. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t get close to the action as an assistant!

A caddy is a pro golfer’s right-hand man. They’re there to do everything they can to make sure the pro can focus on making the best shot possible, including carrying bags, predicting lies, and performing menial tasks like cleaning balls and club heads. While caddies aren’t guaranteed a big payday, they could end up making 10% of their pro’s purse if they go on to win. Not a bad deal for following someone around for a few hours while they hit a ball into a hole.

5. Pro Poker Player

Many of you have most likely entertained the thought of buying a ticket to the World Series of Poker in Las Vegas and dreamed of turning $10,000 into a couple million.

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While it definitely is possible to go from rags to riches if you “run good” during a big tournament, it’s not likely that you, out of the thousands of entrants, will end up winning it all. However, it definitely is possible to make a living playing poker, online or in person; but it requires much more skill and knowledge than luck.

If you understand the math behind the odds, and are good at reading other people, you could potentially make enough money to quit your day job and focus on crushing the felt a few days a week, while having the rest of your time to do whatever you’d like. Just don’t sit down next to Phil Ivey, or your entire bankroll could go down the drain in a couple hours.

Featured photo credit: Play Among Friends Paf / Paf Poker Challenge via farm8.staticflickr.com

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Last Updated on April 25, 2019

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

Shifting careers, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Whether your desire for a career change is self-driven or involuntary, you can manage the panic and fear by understanding ‘why’ you are making the change.

Your ability to clearly and confidently articulate your transferable skills makes it easier for employers to understand how you are best suited for the job or industry.

A well written career change resume that shows you have read the job description and markets your transferable skills can increase your success for a career change.

3 Steps to Prepare Your Mind Before Working on the Resume

Step 1: Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can be an unnerving experience. However, you can lessen the stress by making informed decisions through research.

One of the best ways to do this is by conducting informational interviews.[1] Invest time to gather information from diverse sources. Speaking to people in the career or industry that you’re pursuing will help you get clarity and check your assumptions.

Here are some questions to help you get clear on your career change:

  • What’s your ideal work environment?
  • What’s most important to you right now?
  • What type of people do you like to work with?
  • What are the work skills that you enjoy doing the most?
  • What do you like to do so much that you lose track of time?
  • Whose career inspires you? What is it about his/her career that you admire?
  • What do you dislike about your current role and work environment?

Step 2: Get Clear on What Your Transferable Skills Are[2]

The data gathered from your research and informational interviews will give you a clear picture of the career change that you want. There will likely be a gap between your current experience and the experience required for your desired job. This is your chance to tell your personal story and make it easy for recruiters to understand the logic behind your career change.

Make a list and describe your existing skills and experience. Ask yourself:

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What experience do you have that is relevant to the new job or industry?

Include any experience e.g., work, community, volunteer, or helping a neighbour. The key here is ANY relevant experience. Don’t be afraid to list any tasks that may seem minor to you right now. Remember this is about showcasing the fact that you have experience in the new area of work.

What will the hiring manager care about and how can you demonstrate this?

Based on your research you’ll have an idea of what you’ll be doing in the new job or industry. Be specific and show how your existing experience and skills make you the best candidate for the job. Hiring managers will likely scan your resume in less than 7 seconds. Make it easy for them to see the connection between your skills and the skills that are needed.

Clearly identifying your transferable skills and explaining the rationale for your career change shows the employer that you are making a serious and informed decision about your transition.

Step 3: Read the Job Posting

Each job application will be different even if they are for similar roles. Companies use different language to describe how they conduct business. For example, some companies use words like ‘systems’ while other companies use ‘processes’.

When you review the job description, pay attention to the sections that describe WHAT you’ll be doing and the qualifications/skills. Take note of the type of language and words that the employer uses. You’ll want to use similar language in your resume to show that your experience meets their needs.

5 Key Sections on Your Career Change Resume (Example)

The content of the examples presented below are tailored for a high school educator who wants to change careers to become a client engagement manager, however, you can easily use the same structure for your career change resume.

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Don’t forget to write a well crafted cover letter for your career change to match your updated resume. Your career change cover letter will provide the context and personal story that you’re not able to show in a resume.

1. Contact Information and Header

Create your own letterhead that includes your contact information. Remember to hyperlink your email and LinkedIn profile. Again, make it easy for the recruiter to contact you and learn more about you.

Example:

Jill Young

Toronto, ON | [email protected] | 416.222.2222 | LinkedIn Profile

2. Qualification Highlights or Summary

This is the first section that recruiters will see to determine if you meet the qualifications for the job. Use the language from the job posting combined with your transferable skills to show that you are qualified for the role.

Keep this section concise and use 3 to 4 bullets. Be specific and focus on the qualifications needed for the specific job that you’re applying to. This section should be tailored for each job application. What makes you qualified for the role?

Example:

Qualifications Summary

  • Experienced managing multiple stakeholder interests by building a strong network of relationships to support a variety of programs
  • Experienced at resolving problems in a timely and diplomatic manner
  • Ability to work with diverse groups and ensure collaboration while meeting tight timelines

3. Work Experience

Only present experiences that are relevant to the job posting. Focus on your specific transferable skills and how they apply to the new role.

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How this section is structured will depend on your experience and the type of career change you are making.

For example, if you are changing industries you may want to list your roles before the company name. However, if you want to highlight some of the big companies you’ve worked with then you may want to list the company name first. Just make sure that you are consistent throughout your resume.

Be clear and concise. Use 1 to 4 bullets to highlight your relevant work experiences for each job you list on your resume. Ensure that the information demonstrates your qualifications for the new job. Remember to align all the dates on your resume to the right margin.

Example:

Work Experience

Theater Production Manager 2018 – present

YourLocalTheater

  • Collaborated with diverse groups of people to ensure a successful production while meeting tight timelines

4. Education

List your formal education in this section. For example, the name of the degrees you received and the school who issued it. To eliminate biases, I would recommend removing the year you graduated.

Example:

Education

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  • Bachelor of Education, University of Western Ontario
  • Bachelor of Theater Studies with Honors, University of British Columbia

5. Other Activities or Interests

When you took an inventory of your transferable skills, what experiences were relevant to your new career path (that may not fit in the other resume sections?).

Example:

Other Activities

  • Mentor, Pathways to Education
  • Volunteer lead for coordinating all community festival vendors

Bonus Tips

Remember these core resume tips to help you effectively showcase your transferable skills:

  • CAR (Context Action Result) method. Remember that each bullet on your resume needs to state the situation, the action you took and the result of your experience.
  • Font. Use modern Sans Serif fonts like Tahoma, Verdana, or Arial.
  • White space. Ensure that there is enough white space on your resume by adjusting your margins to a minimum of 1.5 cm. Your resume should be no more than two pages long.
  • Tailor your resume for each job posting. Pay attention to the language and key words used on the job posting and adjust your resume accordingly. Make the application process easy on yourself by creating your own resume template. Highlight sections that you need to tailor for each job application.
  • Get someone else to review your resume. Ideally you’d want to have someone with industry or hiring experience to provide you with insights to hone your resume. However, you also want to have someone proofread your resume for grammar and spelling errors.

The Bottom Line

It’s essential that you know why you want to change careers. Setting this foundation not only helps you with your resume, but can also help you to change your cover letter, adjust your LinkedIn profile, network during your job search, and during interviews.

Ensure that all the content on your resume is relevant for the specific job you’re applying to.

Remember to focus on the job posting and your transferable skills. You have a wealth of experience to draw from – don’t discount any of it! It’s time to showcase and brand yourself in the direction you’re moving towards!

More Resources to Help You Change Career Swiftly

Featured photo credit: Parker Byrd via unsplash.com

Reference

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