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Why You Should Read Books From Every Country In The World (With 30 Books Recommended)

Why You Should Read Books From Every Country In The World (With 30 Books Recommended)

Books offer the privilege of travelling all around the globe without even having to leave one’s comfort zone. Reading also ignites the level of one’s imagination. However, it is equally true that books are reflections of the author’s mindset and their imaginative outburst.

And when diversity is considered to be an asset, it is certain that their works of art touch a flavor of how they own their diversity and it impacts what we receive by reading their works.

So rather than engaging in reading of only a singular culture and lifestyle, it is valuable to learn of the differences and avoid assumptions about others. Here in this article, we present to you a list of 30 books from 30 different countries that are not only significant in terms of literature but should also help you to understand the different settings in which they are set in a better way.

The list is inspired from author Ann Morgan’s TED Talk in which she shares her experiences of reading one book from each and every country in the world over the period of one year. You don’t need to worry about the language of these books though as these works have been translated into multiple languages.

1. France: The Little Prince

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    The Little Prince, which was first published in 1943, is one of the finest masterpieces of all time written by French writer Antoine de Saint-Exupery. It is the third most translated novel today with translations in more than 250 languages with hundreds of millions of copies sold worldwide.

    The novel is a soft tale of love, loneliness, friendship and loss in the form of a young alien Prince who falls to earth. The author is believed to have drawn on his earlier aviation experiences in the Sahara desert to create this novel.

    2. England: Emma

    2

      One of the best works of Jane Austen, Emma was first published in 1815. Several TV shows, films, and stage shows have been adapted from this novel. In the words of Austen herself, the novel is an attempt to create a heroine only for her to like.

      The book portrays a youthful, lively and beautiful Emma Woodhouse as the heroine of Jane Austen where Jane explores the concerns and difficulties of a well-mannered woman living in England.

      3. United States of America: The Scarlet Letter

      3

        The Scarlet Letter, published for the first time in 1850, is one of the finest works of writer Nathaniel Hawthorne. According to D.H. Lawrence, this book is the most perfect work of American imagination. In this fiction story, Hawthorne sets the character Hester Prynne in the historical setting of 17th century Boston. Hester conceives a daughter after an affair and the novel revolves around her struggle for dignity and acceptance in the society.

        4. India: The God of Small Things

        4

          The God of Small Things is the debut novel of Indian writer Arundhati Roy, which was first published in 1997. Roy received the Booker Prize in 1998 for the novel, one of the most prestigious awards for English literature in the world.

          The book explores the life of two fraternal twins in a village in the Indian state of Kerala and beautifully portrays how small things change the behavior and life of people.

          5. Germany: Main Kampf

          5

            Mein Kampf is the autobiographical manifesto of Adolf Hitler published initially in 1925 and 1928 in two volumes. The book has been popularly read for its political theory and has been often criticized for its racial content.

            Literally meaning “My Struggle”, Hitler outlines his political ideology and plans for Germany. In the book, the narrator describes how he became increasingly anti-Semitic and militarist.

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            6. South Africa: Long Walk to Freedom

            6

              Long Walk to Freedom is an autobiographical book by Nelson Mandela that was published for the first time in 1995. The book has been a huge source of inspiration for many and reflects the struggle and determination of Mandela.

              The books explores his early life, his education, his political activities and his 27 years’ prison life in Robben Island under the apartheid government.

              7. Russia: Crime and Punishment

              7

                Crime and Punishment is a novel written by Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky, published first in a Russian Literature journal in series in the year 1866. The author explores the theme of redemption through suffering. This book, when it appeared brought Dostoyevsky at the forefront of Russian literature and since then, has remained one of the most influential novels in world literature.

                8. Italy: The Name of the Rose

                8

                  First published in 1880, The Name of the Rose is a fine work of Italian author Umberto Eco. The novel has been translated into several languages and in 1996, it was even adapted into a film starring Sean Connery and Christine Slater, directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud.

                  Set in Italy during the Middle Ages, the book explores a murder mystery in one Italian monastery in the year 1327.

                  9. China: The Garlic Ballads

                  9

                    The Garlic Ballads is written by 2012’s Nobel Prize winner for Literature Mo Yan. This book was first published in English in 1995 as Yan’s gateway book. Set in the 20th century in rural China, the farmers in the novel are asked by government officials to only grow garlic but which they refuse to buy later. The book is banned in Yan’s native China in the wake of the protests in Tiananmen Square.

                    10. Switzerland: Siddhartha

                    10

                      Published for the first time in 1922, Siddhartha is written by novelist Hermann Hesse. In 1960s when it was first published in USA, the book gained more popularity. With simple words but deep meaning, this book is a capsule to wisdom.

                      The novel is a spiritual journey of a man named Siddhartha who renounces all his princely life back in Kapilvastu, Nepal and decides to live an ascetic life in search of light.

                      11. Lebanon: The Prophet

                      11

                        The Prophet is a book of prose and poems, first published in 1923. Ever since its first publication, the book has never been out of print. This book is considered to be the best work of Kahlil Gibran and has been a best-seller for many years.

                        The book is divided in chapters that talk about marriage, love, children, drinking, eating and many other aspects of life. Lines from this book have influenced many political speeches, songs and other artistic works worldwide.

                        12. Spain: Don Quixote

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                          Don Quixote is one of the most influential works from the Spanish Golden Age. Published first in two volumes in 1605 and 1615, the full title of this novel, written by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, in English is “The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha”.

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                          It tells the story of Alonso Quijano, a Hidalgo, living near La Mancha region of Spain around the beginning of 17th century. He reads the tales about knights, princesses and enchanted castles extensively without even sleeping properly that he goes out of his mind.

                          13. Japan: Almost Transparent Blue

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                            First published in 1976, Almost Transparent Blue is written by prominent Japanese novelist Ryu Murakami. Murakami won several awards for this novel including the prestigious Akutagawa Prize. The book portrays life around the US Base Camp near Kanagawa in the 1970s. The near-plotless story chronicles an intense journey through rough drug addiction, group sex, and other violent acts.

                            14. Norway: A Doll’s House

                            14

                              A Doll’s House is a three-act play in prose that was initially published in 1879, written by Norwegian author Henrik Ibsen. The play was considered significant for it challenged the dogmas of 19th century marriage norms.

                              The play was based on the real life of Ibsen’s close friend Laura Kieler. It describes the events that unfold on the lives of Nora Helmer and her husband Torvald when Nora secretly burrows large sums of money to cure her husband’s illness.

                              15. Portugal: Blindness

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                                Published for the first time in 1995, Blindness is a novel by Nobel Prize winning Portuguese author Jose Saramago.

                                The novel is a magnificent, mesmerizing parable of loss by Saramago. The story is of a city that is hit by an epidemic of “white blindness” that spares no one. The book is a folly and heroism of ordinary lives.

                                16. Turkey: My Name is Red

                                16

                                  My Name is Red is written by Orhan Pamuk who won 2006’s Nobel Prize in Literature. It appeared in its Turkish version first in 1998. It is the recipient of 2003 International IMPAC Dublin Award. Set in Istanbul in the late 1590s, the book is a philosophical thriller about a stirring murder mystery. The other themes of the novel are love, artistic devotion and tensions between the East and the West.

                                  17. Egypt: Children of Gebelawi

                                  17

                                    Published originally in 1959, Children of the Gebelawi is a novel written by Egyptian Nobel Laureate writer Naguib Mahfaouz. The book was opposed by religious authorities in Egypt, which even resulted in him being stabbed by religious extremists and he nearly died in the incident.

                                    The novel reconstructs the interwoven account of the past of the three Abrahamic religions of Islam, Judaism and Christianity. It is set on an imaginary Cairene alley of the 19th century.

                                    18. Brazil: The Devil to Pay in the Backlands

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                                      The Devil to Pay in the Backlands, written by Brazilian writer Joao Guimaraes Rosa, was first published in 1956. The book is now considered to be among the greatest works of Brazilian literature and one of the important works in Latin American Literature.

                                      In this book, Riobaldo, a bandit who has been long travelling Brazil’s interior, tells the story of his life to an unknown listener. The story initially begins in ordinary manner but soon it tells about the life of a man struggling with life, love, friendship, devil and trust.

                                      19. Ireland: Gulliver’s Travels

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                                        Gulliver’s Travel is the most popular and classic work of Jonathan Swift, that was published for the first time in 1726. This satire of travel narratives and human behaviors became a bestseller soon after its publication.

                                        It is the story of Lemuel Gulliver, a surgeon from Nottinghamshire who loves traveling. On a fateful voyage to the South Seas, he is caught up in a storm and washed up on Lilliput, an island of tiny people who are about 6 inches tall. He then runs into several other types of people in different places as well.

                                        20. Iceland: The Independent People

                                        20

                                          Originally published in two volumes in 1934 and 1935, The Independent People is an epic novel written by Nobel Laureate Halldor Laxness. This book, along with others helped Laxness win the Nobel Prize in 1955 crediting his vivid epic power that has renewed the great narrative art of Iceland.

                                          The book is the story of an Irish sheep farmer Guobjartur Jonsson and his battle for independence. After working for others for many years, Jonsson saves enough to lease a sheep farm of his own. However, it is in a valley believed to be haunted.

                                          21. Iran: The Blind Owl

                                          21

                                            The Blind Owl is a book by Iranian writer Sadegh Hedayat. It was published first as a limited edition in Bombay in 1937. It later appeared in Tehran in 1941. Written during the final years of Reza Shah’s rule, it’s considered a major literary work of Iran from the 20th century.

                                            Regarded among the finest works in modern Iranian literature, Hedayat’s masterpiece is a moving tale of loss and spiritual ruin that tells the story of a young man’s anguish after the loss of his enigmatic lover.

                                            22. Mexico: Pedro Paramo

                                            22

                                              Published originally in 1955, Pedro Paramo is a novel written by Mexican author Juan Rulfo. The book has been a source of inspiration for many Latin American writers including Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

                                              This novel is about a man named Juan Preciado who after the demise of his mother, travels to her hometown of Comala to find his father and happens to come across a ghost town populated by haunted figures.

                                              23. Austria: The Man without Qualities

                                              23

                                                The Man without Qualities is an unfinished novel published first as three books from 1930 to 1943, written by Austrian novelist Robert Musil. This unfinished novel took Musil more than twenty years and was halted by his death.

                                                Set in Vienna on the eve of World War I around the time of Austro-Hungarian monarchy’s last days, this novel is now considered to be one of the most important modernist novels. It dissects various human themes and feelings.

                                                24. Sweden: Pippi Longstocking

                                                24

                                                  Pippi Longstocking is a series of children books by Swedish author Astrid Lindgren. The name Pippi was given by Lindgren’s then nine year old daughter. Different volumes of the book were published at various times between 1945 and 2000.

                                                  Story set in a Swedish village, it tells the story of Pippi who lives in her madcap house “Villa Villekulla” with a monkey. Her exuberant ways cause as much trouble as fun but she remains irrepressible and irrefutably charming at all times.

                                                  25. Peru: The Time of the Hero

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                                                    Published for the first time in 1963, The Time of the Hero is a novel written by Nobel Prize Winner Mario Vergas Llosa. The novel has been adapted into a film by Peruvian film director Francisco Lombardi.

                                                    The story of the novel is set up among a community of cadets in a military school in Lima. Llosa was so accurate in portraying the academy with the powerful social satire that it outraged the authorities of Peru, where thousands of copies of the novel were burnt publicly.

                                                    26. Argentina: The Motorcycle Diaries

                                                    26

                                                      The Motorcycle Diaries is the memoir of Marxist revolutionary Ernesto Che Guevara from his early motorcycle journey across Latin America, when motorcycling didn’t involve modern gadgets. The book has been a New York Times bestseller for a long time.

                                                      It tells the real story of a young Argentine man who went on to become such a huge icon and a major threat to global capitalism. The experience in the travel that transforms Che has been described by many as a coming-of-age story of adventure and self-discovery.

                                                      27. Colombia: One Hundred Years of Solitude

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                                                        Published originally in 1967, One Hundred Years of Solitude is a masterpiece from Colombian author Gabriel Garcia Marquez. It’s one of the representative novels from the literary Latin American Boom.

                                                        The multi-generational story of the Buendian family is a brilliant amalgamation of elements from all Marquez’s previous short stories. It tells the captivating story of the rise and fall of a mythical Macando town through the family’s history.

                                                        28. Chile: The House of the Spirits

                                                        28

                                                          Published for the first time in 1982, The House of the Spirits is a masterpiece bestseller of Isabel Allende. The novel was declared as the best novel in 1982 in Chile where Allende also received the country’s prestigious Panorama Literary award.

                                                          Allende constructs a spirit ridden world that turns out to be a symbolic family saga and story of the turbulent history of an unnamed Latin American country. Incorporating the elements from magical realism, it tells the story of Trueba family spanning across four generations.

                                                          29. Nigeria: Things Fall Apart

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                                                            Published originally in 1958, Things Fall Apart is a post-colonial novel written by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe which is probably the first to receive global critical acclaim. It was also the first work to be published in Heimann’s African Writers Series.

                                                            The novel is an intertwining of two stories both centered on the protagonist Okonkwo, who is an Igbo leader and local wrestling champion in the fictional Umuofia village of Nigeria.

                                                            30. Pakistan: I am Malala

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                                                              I am Malala is Malala Yusufzai’s fearless memoir, co-written by journalist Christina Lamb that was published for the first time in 2013. This book is inspirational and depicts the dire necessity of change in the life of women in Pakistan.

                                                              The youngest Nobel Laureate, Malala explains the life under Taliban rule in her home district, Swat Valley in Pakistan. Already an activist for girl’s education in the Swat Valley since 2012, Malala explains the situation of women in Pakistan.

                                                              Featured photo credit: Girl Reading a Book via pixabay.com

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                                                              Last Updated on October 15, 2019

                                                              How To Be Successful In Life? 13 Tips From The Most Successful People

                                                              How To Be Successful In Life? 13 Tips From The Most Successful People

                                                              What is success to you? How to be successful in life?

                                                              To some, when they think of success, they imagine wealth; others want power; some just want to make a positive impact on the world.

                                                              All of these are perfectly valid, indeed success is a concept that means different things to different people. Though no matter what success is to you, it almost certainly isn’t something will come easily.

                                                              There are countless guides and books to being successful, however, as success is personal and unique to each individual. The advice contained in these books can often not be relevant. Therefore following the advice of a single individual can often be unhelpful.

                                                              With this in mind, considering the advice of a great many people, people whose ideas of success were different both to each other, and quite possibly, to you can be a good alternative.

                                                              What follows is a list of thirteen of the best pieces of advice from some of the most successful people who have ever lived. If you want to learn how to be successful, these 13 tips are essential:

                                                              1. Think Big

                                                                From Michelangelo Buonarroti, Great Renaissance Artist:

                                                                “The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short; but in setting our aim too low, and achieving our mark.”

                                                                There are few artists as influential as Michaelangelo. Today centuries after his death, his work still inspires and connects to people. His work is world famous, just think of his statue of David, or the Mural in the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican.

                                                                Imagine then, if he decided not to work as an artist.

                                                                Being a successful artist has always been extremely difficult, imagine if he decided to give up this ambition in favour of something easier?

                                                                Oftentimes, people often decided to put their dreams aside for something more “realistic”. To give up their dream for something easier. This quote teaches us the danger of such a point of view.
                                                                Instead be ambitious.

                                                                2. Find What You Love to Do and Do It

                                                                  From Oprah Winfrey, Media Mogul:

                                                                  “You know you are on the road to success if you would do your job and not be paid for it.”

                                                                  This is a good quote to remember and think about when you’re at work.

                                                                  Imagine being as successful as possible in your current job. Ultimately you’ll probably find yourself working extremely hard and this it will take up much of your time.

                                                                  If it’s a job you hate, then being successful at it might only mean filling your life with something you hate to do. What’s the sense in this?

                                                                  Instead, why not focus on doing something you love? When you’ve found what you’re passionate about, you get the motivation to keep you moving. Success at this means the fulfilment of your dreams.

                                                                  Not sure what your passion is yet? You should learn about this Motivation Engine first.

                                                                  Even if you’re not successful, you still filled your time with something you love to do. Many successful musicians spent years of their lives doing unpaid performances, the only reason they kept playing was because they loved to perform.

                                                                  3. Learn How to Balance Life

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                                                                    From Phil Knight, CEO of Nike Inc.:

                                                                    “There is an immutable conflict at work in life and in business, a constant battle between peace and chaos. Neither can be mastered, but both can be influenced. How you go about that is the key to success.”

                                                                    All too often, people think that to be successful, they need to make the object of their success their life.

                                                                    If a person thinks their job will lead them to success, then they may spend countless hours per day, and well into the evening working hard.

                                                                    However this comes at the cost of rest, your health and having an enjoyable life. Ultimately they may burn out and cease to be successful at their job anyway.

                                                                    If success comes from having a strong social life and a good group of friends, their job may suffer; meaning that they may lose their job, and then be unable to afford going out with friends.

                                                                    In these ways, success, as Phil Knight says above, is helped by balance. Think of it as a balance between rest and work, or work and play.

                                                                    To achieve that balance, this Ultimate Guide to Prioritizing Your Work And Life can help you.

                                                                    4. Do Not Be Afraid of Failure

                                                                      From Henry Ford, Founder of Ford Motors:

                                                                      “Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently.”

                                                                      There is a story, it’s unconfirmed whether it actually happened, yet the message within is none the less true:

                                                                      Thomas Edison inventing the lightbulb was the result of several hundred failed attempts. In an interview, he was asked “How do you feel after all of your failed attempts?”

                                                                      His response was great, “I didn’t fail, I learned hundreds of ways not to invent the lightbulb”

                                                                      He saw each “failure” as a lesson. From that lesson he learned what won’t work, and also might work instead.

                                                                      Each failed attempt, each rejection, were key steps on his path to success. It is easy to feel like you should give up after a failure. But perhaps in that failure is a lesson.

                                                                      Pay attention to your failures, study them. Perhaps then you’ll learn how to succeed.

                                                                      If you find it difficult to fight your fear of failure, here’s a guide for you: Why You Have the Fear of Failure (And How to Conquer It Step-By-Step)

                                                                      5. Have an Unwavering Resolution to Succeed

                                                                        From Colonel Sanders, Founder of KFC:

                                                                        “I made a resolve then that I was going to amount to something if I could. And no hours, nor amount of labor, nor amount of money would deter me from giving the best that there was in me. And I have done that ever since, and I win by it. I know.”

                                                                        This, in many ways relates to the above quote about learning from your failures.

                                                                        It’s the easiest thing in the world to give up from a failure. The only way to push on is if you have the true burning desire to succeed, to not be moved or dissuaded from your goals.

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                                                                        If you are not truly dedicated towards success, then each failure will hurt more, each set back will slow you down.

                                                                        Success is hard; without the unwavering desire to succeed, this difficulty may seem insurmountable. With the desire, it is merely an obstacle to go through.

                                                                        6. Be a Person of Action

                                                                          From Leonardo da Vinci, Renaissance Genius:

                                                                          “It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things.”

                                                                          Though it was said hundreds of years ago, it works just as much today as it ever had. It applies to literally any successful person.

                                                                          Think about it, picture someone like William Shakespeare:

                                                                          When we think of the time he lived in, we think of the time in a way shaped by him. When we think of Renaissance era Italy, we think of Michelangelo and Leonardo Da Vinci. Or think about the present day, Bill Gates or Steve Jobs. Our current way of life would simply be incomparably different if they didn’t accomplish what they did.

                                                                          You’re probably reading this article on a device by a company that they either founded or companies influenced by them.

                                                                          All these figures were proactive, they saw ways to do things differently and did them. If they let the world shape them, then they’d simply fit into the background. Instead they shaped the world.

                                                                          Applying this to you?

                                                                          Don’t be afraid of going outside the norm. If you can think of a better way to do something, do it that way. If you fail, try again.

                                                                          7. Cultivate Positive Relationships

                                                                            From Theodore Roosevelt, 26th President of America: “

                                                                            The most important single ingredient in the formula of success is knowing how to get along with people.”

                                                                            The best leaders and some of the most influential people (and Theodore Roosevelt is one of the best leaders and one of the most influential people to have lived) were not those who caused commotions, who fought with people or disregarded people; but were people who were friendly to those around them.

                                                                            People liked them. They wanted them to do well.

                                                                            This is key to good leadership.

                                                                            It’s logical. If someone likes you, they want to help you; if you give them a suggestion, they’ll gladly follow through with it.

                                                                            But if someone doesn’t like you, they may either refuse to help or actively get in your way.

                                                                            What’s more, it’s always a good idea to cultivate good relationships. You can never tell who will prove to become someone who’ll be able to help you in a big way, or even be a good and supportive friend.

                                                                            As such, help people and they may help you; and be good to people, and they my be good to you.

                                                                            8. Don’t Be Afraid of Introducing New Ideas

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                                                                              From Mark Twain, Famed Author:

                                                                              “A person with a new idea is a crank until the idea succeeds.”

                                                                              It is an unfortunate truth that those with the boldest ideas are often disregarded.

                                                                              Most of us are taught from an early age to think and do things similarly to everyone else. This can be great to fill an existing role. But to truly do things differently (and all successful people did things differently), you need to think differently.

                                                                              If you have a new idea, don’t throw it away because it’s new and different; instead, celebrate it. Your strange new idea might one day be the one that leads you to success.

                                                                              9. Believe in Your Capacity to Succeed

                                                                                From Walter Disney, Founder of Walt Disney Company:

                                                                                “If you can dream it, you can do it.”

                                                                                Success has to be something you can imagine yourself achieving.

                                                                                It is possible that you will come across those who doubt you and your ability to succeed. You must not become one of these people because the moment you cease believing and dreaming is the moment these dreams fall away.

                                                                                Keep dreaming!

                                                                                10. Always Maintain a Positive Mental Attitude

                                                                                  From Thomas Jefferson, 3rd President of America:

                                                                                  “Nothing can stop the man with the right mental attitude from achieving his goal; nothing on earth can help the man with the wrong mental attitude.”

                                                                                  Like the above quote says, you need to trust in your ability to succeed. This is the only way to cultivate the right mindset.

                                                                                  Replace negative thoughts with the positive ones. You need to approach problems, not as obstacles stopping you, but merely tasks that need to be completed for you to keep going.

                                                                                  If you stay positive and think like this, setbacks won’t affect you so much, people’s doubts won’t impact you and even the biggest obstacles will seem like minor problems.

                                                                                  However with the wrong mindset of doubt, you’ll be much easier to stop.

                                                                                  11. Don’t Let Discouragement Stop You from Pressing On

                                                                                    From Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of America:

                                                                                    “Let no feeling of discouragement prey upon you, and in the end you are sure to succeed.”

                                                                                    It is an unfortunate fact of human nature — all of us in some way, doubt ourselves. This can be made far worse if others doubt us too.

                                                                                    When surrounded by doubts, giving up can actually seem like a good idea.

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                                                                                    Don’t pay attention to the doubts. If you are discouraged, ignore it.

                                                                                    If this discouragement moves into your mind and you begin to doubt yourself. It is important to ignore this too.

                                                                                    This is How Self Doubt Keeps You Stuck and How to Overcome It

                                                                                    12. Be Willing to Work Hard

                                                                                      From JC Penny, Founder of JC Penney Inc.:

                                                                                      “Unless you are willing to drench yourself in your work beyond the capacity of the average man, you are just not cut out for positions at the top.”

                                                                                      You might have heard the quote that “success is 1% inspiration, 99% perspiration” or you may have heard about the 10,000 hours idea.

                                                                                      Whichever way you frame it, they say one thing:

                                                                                      True success comes from work.

                                                                                      You’ll never become successful if you don’t work towards your goal in life and keep working towards it.

                                                                                      Check out this article and you’ll understand Why Hard Work Beats Talent.

                                                                                      13. Be Brave Enough to Follow Your Intuition

                                                                                        From Steve Jobs, Co-founder of Apple Inc.:

                                                                                        “Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”

                                                                                        In ancient Greece, there was a group of Oracles who lived in Delphi. Everyone who needed advice or to know their future visited them, from the poorest of society to kings. Above the doorway of the temple were the words “know thyself”.

                                                                                        If you strongly believe and desire something, chances are that you already have an idea how to get there. If not, you may naturally know what things will help you and what things will slow you down.

                                                                                        It’s like how your body can detect danger even when things seem safe.

                                                                                        Ultimately then, you need to trust your own instincts.

                                                                                        Final Thoughts

                                                                                        What you might have noticed is that many of the above lessons are similar — most are about developing the right state of mind. This clearly suggests that the key to achieving success, in whatever you wish, comes down to the way you approach it mentally.

                                                                                        Moreover, no matter what stage of life you’re at now, you can still make a difference and pursue success. You can make resetting your life possible when you do this: How to Start Over and Reboot Your Life When It Seems Too Late

                                                                                        More to Help You Succeed in Life

                                                                                        Featured photo credit: Ryan Wong via unsplash.com

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