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This Is What Happens When You’ve Traveled Alone

This Is What Happens When You’ve Traveled Alone

Although you will get lost more than once, traveling alone is one of the best investments you can make for yourself. People who love to travel can testify that you fill your mind with cherished memories and gain precious experiences that serve you well throughout life. You not only appreciate other people and their cultures when you travel alone, but also develop as a person and have beautiful stories to share.

Here’s what happens when you travel alone.

1. You learn to be open-minded.

Traveling in general allows you to experience the unknown. It invites you to open your mind and appreciate what the world has to offer. When you travel alone, you are like a free ion. You are not contained within group mentality or restrained by group think. You are free to explore and debunk false assumptions of places and many other imagined barriers and judgments by evaluating them for yourself. You test your own beliefs and assumptions to ascertain what is true.

To make the most of what the world has to offer, an open mind is vital. Without it, you’ll be missing out a lot.

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2. You learn to trust yourself.

When you travel alone, you prove to yourself that you can take on challenges and deal with problems as they arise. As a result, your confidence in yourself grows and you trust yourself more. You become more forgiving and kinder to yourself. Even when you make mistakes or blunders while traveling, you learn to forgive yourself and try again more intelligently. You don’t allow mistakes to shatter your confidence because you realize confidence is one of your most valuable assets on the road.

Learning to trust and believe in yourself will serve you well throughout life.

3. You learn to face your fears.

There is no pill to swallow to overcome fear. Sorry, you just have to face your fears to beat them. When you travel alone, you face your fears head on, including fear of the unknown, fear of a place due to bad publicity, and fear of being alone far from familiar faces. The reward, however, is worthwhile. Fear stops controlling you. You gain back control of your life.

The net effect of overcoming fear and empowering yourself in this way will reflect in other areas of your life too.

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4. You learn to test your limits.

Seriously, do you know how far you can walk? How about food? Do you know how much food you can eat? And money. Do you know much money you can survive on a day? When you travel alone, you find you are constantly broke or short in some way. That tests your limits, but you grow stronger. You expand and not shrink. You learn just how strong, adaptable and resilient you really are. You finally begin to figure yourself out. It’s a rewarding process of self-discovery.

However, the cherry on the cake perhaps is that you will look (and be treated) like a hero when you get back home from traveling.

5. You learn to plan ahead.

When you are getting ready to travel alone, you imagine different scenarios and try to think of possible solutions for each one of them. You try to cover every possible likelihood you may encounter. While the perfect plan doesn’t guarantee a smooth trip (things happen on the road), it guarantees you are more likely to enjoy the trip. So, you learn to appreciate the benefits of planning ahead, which proves helpful throughout your life.

Importantly, you learn to prepare for the unknown and deal with unforeseen events. In other words, you learn life.

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6. You learn to speak another language.

Gestures and body language can get you far when you don’t understand a word of what someone is saying, but a few useful words and phrases can get you further. When you travel alone, there is no one to turn to. You find you have to open your mouth and let those foreign words trickle out of your tongue, no matter how poor your grammar and imperfect your pronunciation. It may be embarrassing for you, but locals usually appreciate when a foreigner genuinely attempts to speak their langue.

Besides, nothing builds a stronger connection and improves your foreign language skills faster than speaking directly with the native speakers.

7. You learn to make new friends.

It is often said that the older you get, the harder it is to make new friends. That may be true ordinarily, but not really if you love travelling alone. Even if you are shy, you will find that you have to build new relationships on your journey and soon discover it doesn’t take much to make a new friend, no matter how old you are.

A friendly smile, a gentle nod or a helpful hand—that is usually all it takes to initiate friendship.

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8. You learn to enjoy your own company.

Yes, there will be nights when you miss home and have a good cry on your bed. Yes, there will be days when you eat alone and wish you had someone to talk to. Yes, there will be days when you get lost and wish you had someone you knew well to call. But, you will learn to appreciate the company of strangers. You will learn to enjoy the beauty of nature by yourself. You will learn to love your own company. More importantly, you will learn to smile and be happy in life.

The reason you will smile and be happy in life is because you know this to be true: wherever you are in the world, you will always have yourself. You can never be truly alone, and no one can change that.

More by this author

David K. William

David is a publisher and entrepreneur who tries to help professionals grow their business and careers, and gives advice for entrepreneurs.

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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Review Your Past Flow

Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

    Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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