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6 Great Life Lessons From Cara Delevingne

6 Great Life Lessons From Cara Delevingne

The one thing you notice about Cara Delevingne is that she is not afraid to be herself and that is a lesson for all of us. She is beautiful, intelligent, talented, and some people have joked on Facebook that maybe she is not human after all: she is an angel on earth! Well, if she is, I wish there were a few more around who could inspire us. Here are 6 things that Cara Delevingne does and believes that can teach us to be our true selves.

1. She wants to wear comfortable clothes

How often do we become fashion victims? We are obsessed with how we look and what we must wear. Not Cara D. She may be a model, actress and have to be beautifully dressed for certain roles but when she relaxes, she loves to go around in trainers and comfortable shoes. That is most of the time so maybe we should lighten up a bit on the fashion front.

“I love comfort. Comfort is very key to me because I spend most of my time in very uncomfortable things, so it’s all about trainers and flats.”- Cara Delevingne

2. She wants to develop her talents

Cara has it made. She could just sit back and rest on her laurels. But no, she wants to become a famous actress as well. That is an inspiration for us all to explore our hidden talents.

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She has recently starred in Paper Towns. It is a teen romance but it is fascinating how the characters in the film change from the beginning to the end. Cara plays Margo, who is rather a mysterious character.

“But the real find here is Delevingne, an English actress who, with her subtly smoky voice and piercing gaze, makes the girl of Quentin’s fantasies a singularly charismatic presence, all the more so due to her limited screen time. What ultimately happens to Margo may seem somewhat ambiguous by film’s end, but on the evidence of her work here, this striking actress is here to stay.”- Variety

Watch the trailer to get a glimpse of Cara’s talents as an actress.

3. She is always grateful

When Cara was criticized for a recent awkward interview, the author of Paper Towns, John Green came to her defense. He said that she was neither haughty nor entitled and she has no time for stupid questions, such as whether she had actually read his novel, on which the film is based.

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Cara tweeted afterwards:-

“thank you so much john!! I just read the article and it made me want to cry! You are so special!! I am so happy I know you x.”

She later added:

“I am soooooo lucky and anyone who thinks I am unappreciative or ungrateful clearly doesn’t know me.”

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We tend to focus too much on the negative aspects of our existence and Cara teaches us to be grateful.

4. She is not afraid to come out about her sexuality

‘It took me a long time to accept the idea, until I first fell in love with a girl at 20 and recognised that I had to accept it.” – Cara Delevingne

When news broke that Cara is dating St. Vincent (Annie Clarke), this caused a stir. Vogue claimed that it was merely a phase and might have been a result of some childhood trauma. People reacted and a petition was signed in which they objected to this false stereotype about gay people.

“I think that being in love with my girlfriend is a big part of why I’m feeling so happy with who I am these days. And for those words to come out of my mouth is actually a miracle.” – Cara Delevingne

5. She objects to bullying

Cara thinks that kids nowadays have lots of problems. She is particularly concerned about online bullying. She has always made a strong case for kids to connect and really talk to each other instead of relying on messages and tweets. There is a lesson there for all of us as we lose the true value of true communication when we rely too much on our devices.

“Kids should speak to each other. They’re horrid to each other online, they bully each other- they should shut up and stop it. The problem with social media is there is too much freedom. It’s too much, too young.” – Cara Delevingne

6. She wants to cheer us all up

It is no secret that Cara resorted to self-harm when she was a teenager as a reaction to her very troubled adolescence. She has even described how she used to bang her head against a tree in the hope that she would be unconscious and not have to bear the pain and suffering, at least temporarily. She also thought about committing suicide.

Now that is all behind her and Cara is dedicated to getting the best out of life, entertaining her fans with funny photos on Instagram and goofing around generally.

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“The energy you give off is the energy you receive. I really think that, so I’m always myself–jumping, dancing, singing around, trying to cheer everybody up.” – Cara Delevingne

Featured photo credit: Face of an angel 02/ GabboT via flickr.com

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Robert Locke

Freelance writer

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system”.

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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The power of habit

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being six hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The wonderful thing about triggers (reminders)

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to make a reminder works for you

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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