Advertising
Advertising

6 Great Life Lessons From Cara Delevingne

6 Great Life Lessons From Cara Delevingne

The one thing you notice about Cara Delevingne is that she is not afraid to be herself and that is a lesson for all of us. She is beautiful, intelligent, talented, and some people have joked on Facebook that maybe she is not human after all: she is an angel on earth! Well, if she is, I wish there were a few more around who could inspire us. Here are 6 things that Cara Delevingne does and believes that can teach us to be our true selves.

1. She wants to wear comfortable clothes

How often do we become fashion victims? We are obsessed with how we look and what we must wear. Not Cara D. She may be a model, actress and have to be beautifully dressed for certain roles but when she relaxes, she loves to go around in trainers and comfortable shoes. That is most of the time so maybe we should lighten up a bit on the fashion front.

“I love comfort. Comfort is very key to me because I spend most of my time in very uncomfortable things, so it’s all about trainers and flats.”- Cara Delevingne

2. She wants to develop her talents

Cara has it made. She could just sit back and rest on her laurels. But no, she wants to become a famous actress as well. That is an inspiration for us all to explore our hidden talents.

Advertising

She has recently starred in Paper Towns. It is a teen romance but it is fascinating how the characters in the film change from the beginning to the end. Cara plays Margo, who is rather a mysterious character.

“But the real find here is Delevingne, an English actress who, with her subtly smoky voice and piercing gaze, makes the girl of Quentin’s fantasies a singularly charismatic presence, all the more so due to her limited screen time. What ultimately happens to Margo may seem somewhat ambiguous by film’s end, but on the evidence of her work here, this striking actress is here to stay.”- Variety

Watch the trailer to get a glimpse of Cara’s talents as an actress.

3. She is always grateful

When Cara was criticized for a recent awkward interview, the author of Paper Towns, John Green came to her defense. He said that she was neither haughty nor entitled and she has no time for stupid questions, such as whether she had actually read his novel, on which the film is based.

Advertising

Cara tweeted afterwards:-

“thank you so much john!! I just read the article and it made me want to cry! You are so special!! I am so happy I know you x.”

She later added:

“I am soooooo lucky and anyone who thinks I am unappreciative or ungrateful clearly doesn’t know me.”

Advertising

We tend to focus too much on the negative aspects of our existence and Cara teaches us to be grateful.

4. She is not afraid to come out about her sexuality

‘It took me a long time to accept the idea, until I first fell in love with a girl at 20 and recognised that I had to accept it.” – Cara Delevingne

When news broke that Cara is dating St. Vincent (Annie Clarke), this caused a stir. Vogue claimed that it was merely a phase and might have been a result of some childhood trauma. People reacted and a petition was signed in which they objected to this false stereotype about gay people.

“I think that being in love with my girlfriend is a big part of why I’m feeling so happy with who I am these days. And for those words to come out of my mouth is actually a miracle.” – Cara Delevingne

5. She objects to bullying

Cara thinks that kids nowadays have lots of problems. She is particularly concerned about online bullying. She has always made a strong case for kids to connect and really talk to each other instead of relying on messages and tweets. There is a lesson there for all of us as we lose the true value of true communication when we rely too much on our devices.

“Kids should speak to each other. They’re horrid to each other online, they bully each other- they should shut up and stop it. The problem with social media is there is too much freedom. It’s too much, too young.” – Cara Delevingne

6. She wants to cheer us all up

It is no secret that Cara resorted to self-harm when she was a teenager as a reaction to her very troubled adolescence. She has even described how she used to bang her head against a tree in the hope that she would be unconscious and not have to bear the pain and suffering, at least temporarily. She also thought about committing suicide.

Now that is all behind her and Cara is dedicated to getting the best out of life, entertaining her fans with funny photos on Instagram and goofing around generally.

Advertising

“The energy you give off is the energy you receive. I really think that, so I’m always myself–jumping, dancing, singing around, trying to cheer everybody up.” – Cara Delevingne

Featured photo credit: Face of an angel 02/ GabboT via flickr.com

More by this author

Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

10 Reasons Why People Are Unmotivated (And How to Be Motivated) 12 Secrets To a Super Productive Meeting You Should Know Work Smarter, Not Harder: 12 Smart Ways to Be More Productive What Your Fear of Being Alone Is Really About and How to Get over It 10 Simple Morning Exercises That Will Make You Feel Great All Day

Trending in Featured

1 Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed 2 12 Rules for Self-Management 3 How to Take Notes Effectively: Powerful Note-Taking Techniques 4 How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators 5 How to Master the Art of Prioritization

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on October 15, 2019

Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

Procrastination is very literally the opposite of productivity. To produce something is to pull it forward, while to procrastinate is to push it forward — to tomorrow, to next week, or ultimately to never.

Procrastination fills us with shame — we curse ourselves for our laziness, our inability to focus on the task at hand, our tendency to be easily led into easier and more immediate gratifications. And with good reason: for the most part, time spent procrastinating is time spent not doing things that are, in some way or other, important to us.

There is a positive side to procrastination, but it’s important not to confuse procrastination at its best with everyday garden-variety procrastination.

Sometimes — sometimes! — procrastination gives us the time we need to sort through a thorny issue or to generate ideas. In those rare instances, we should embrace procrastination — even as we push it away the rest of the time.

Why we procrastinate after all

We procrastinate for a number of reasons, some better than others. One reason we procrastinate is that, while we know what we want to do, we need time to let the ideas “ferment” before we are ready to sit down and put them into action.

Some might call this “creative faffing”; I call it, following copywriter Ray Del Savio’s lead, “concepting”.[1]

Whatever you choose to call it, it’s the time spent dreaming up what you want to say or do, weighing ideas in your mind, following false leads and tearing off on mental wild goose chases, and generally thinking things through.

Advertising

To the outside observer, concepting looks like… well, like nothing much at all. Maybe you’re leaning back in your chair, feet up, staring at the wall or ceiling, or laying in bed apparently dozing, or looking out over the skyline or feeding pigeons in the park or fiddling with the Japanese vinyl toys that stand watch over your desk.

If ideas are the lifeblood of your work, you have to make time for concepting, and you have to overcome the sensation— often overpowering in our work-obsessed culture — that faffing, however creative, is not work.

So, is procrastination bad?

Yes it is.

Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re “concepting” when in fact you’re just not sure what you’re supposed to be doing.

Spending an hour staring at the wall while thinking up the perfect tagline for a marketing campaign is creative faffing; staring at the wall for an hour because you don’t know how to come up with a tagline, or don’t know the product you’re marketing well enough to come up with one, is just wasting time.

Lack of definition is perhaps the biggest friend of your procrastination demons. When we’re not sure what to do — whether because we haven’t planned thoroughly enough, we haven’t specified the scope of what we hope to accomplish in the immediate present, or we lack important information, skills, or resources to get the job done.

It’s easy to get distracted or to trick ourselves into spinning our wheels doing nothing. It takes our mind off the uncomfortable sensation of failing to make progress on something important.

Advertising

The answer to this is in planning and scheduling. Rather than giving yourself an unspecified length of time to perform an unspecified task (“Let’s see, I guess I’ll work on that spreadsheet for a while”) give yourself a limited amount of time to work on a clearly defined task (“Now I’ll enter the figures from last months sales report into the spreadsheet for an hour”).

Giving yourself a deadline, even an artificial one, helps build a sense of urgency and also offers the promise of time to “screw around” later, once more important things are done.

For larger projects, planning plays a huge role in whether or not you’ll spend too much time procrastinating to reach the end reasonably quickly.

A good plan not only lists the steps you have to take to reach the end, but takes into account the resources, knowledge and inputs from other people you’re going to need to perform those steps.

Instead of futzing around doing nothing because you don’t have last month’s sales report, getting the report should be a step in the project.

Otherwise, you’ll spend time cooling your heels, justifying your lack of action as necessary: you aren’t wasting time because you want to, but because you have to.

How bad procrastination can be

Our mind can often trick us into procrastinating, often to the point that we don’t realize we’re procrastinating at all.

Advertising

After all, we have lots and lots of things to do; if we’re working on something, aren’t we being productive – even if the one big thing we need to work on doesn’t get done?

One way this plays out is that we scan our to-do list, skipping over the big challenging projects in favor of the short, easy projects. At the end of the day, we feel very productive: we’ve crossed twelve things off our list!

That big project we didn’t work on gets put onto the next day’s list, and when the same thing happens, it gets moved forward again. And again.

Big tasks often present us with the problem above – we aren’t sure what to do exactly, so we look for other ways to occupy ourselves.

In many cases too, big tasks aren’t really tasks at all; they’re aggregates of many smaller tasks. If something’s sitting on your list for a long time, each day getting skipped over in favor of more immediately doable tasks, it’s probably not very well thought out.

You’re actively resisting it because you don’t really know what it is. Try to break it down into a set of small tasks, something more like the tasks you are doing in place of the one big task you aren’t doing.

More consequences of procrastination can be found in this article:

Advertising

8 Dreadful Effects of Procrastination That Can Destroy Your Life

Procrastination, a technical failure

Procrastination is, more often than not, a sign of a technical failure, not a moral failure.

It’s not because we’re bad people that we procrastinate. Most times, procrastination serves as a symptom of something more fundamentally wrong with the tasks we’ve set ourselves.

It’s important to keep an eye on our procrastinating tendencies, to ask ourselves whenever we notice ourselves pushing things forward what it is about the task we’ve set ourselves that simply isn’t working for us.

Featured photo credit: chuttersnap via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next