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5 Easy Ways Entrepreneurs Destress During the Holidays

5 Easy Ways Entrepreneurs Destress During the Holidays

With many major holidays happening, entrepreneurs may find themselves stressing out. With the rush of preparing for the end of the year, having major holiday sales, and managing the to-dos of the holiday season, the end of year can be a very stressful time for entrepreneurs—especially those who are stretched to capacity running a successful business and are now trying to squeeze the additional activities of the holiday season.

As an entrepreneur, there is always something you can be working on to grow and improve your businesses. You wear many hats and often take care of the sales, marketing, accounting, and other duties for your business.

For many businesses, the holidays bring more customers in the door, and sales are at their highest levels for the year. This means you have to be on top of your game to make the most of the opportunities. In order to manage your work life with your family life, we need to keep a few items in check.

To help entrepreneurs destress, the tips included in this blog post are simple and easy to do.

1. They slow down.

“For fast-acting relief, try slowing down.”

~Lily Tomlin~

During the holidays, it’s very easy to let things speed past you and get out of control. Sometimes it might just take you stepping back and allowing things to slow down. What does this look like? Good question:

  • Make sure to that you allow yourself to take off time from working your business on the holidays.
  • If you have a team, give them time off during the holidays too.
  • Look at cutting back the hours that you work during a holiday week so that you can slow down.
  • Spend time with family and friends so that you can remember the importance of the holidays.

2. They let it go.

“Give your stress wings and let it fly away.”

~Terri Guillemets~

When you hold in all of your stress, in can affect your mind, body, and soul. Give yourself permission to let go of the stress. As you do this, you can open yourself to healing.

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One of the ways you can let it go is by taking a break. According to “The Importance of Breaks At Work”:

“Break laws aren’t just there to make employers take it easy on their workers, they are there for the good of employees. Did you know even a 30 second microbreak can increase your productivity up to 13%? Or that a 15 second break from staring at your computer screen every ten minutes can reduce your fatigue 50%?”

3. They plan smart.

“God didn’t do it all in one day. What makes me think I can?”

~Author Unknown~

Putting plans in place that can help you keep your business running smoothly during the holidays is very important. The plans could include time when you are closed, or special sales for VIP customers, or even team celebration time.

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During the holidays, normally my team and I shut down our offices. We alert our customers to let them know when we will be open and closed. Having this plan in place, gives me and my team time off and it allows my customers to prepare accordingly.

4. They think things through.

“The greatest weapon against stress is our ability to choose one thought over another.”

~William James~

Stress comes from fear that things are not going to work out. If you choose to believe things will work out, you’ll be a lot more comfortable in your decisions. You’ll be able to stay in the moment, and focus on what’s right ahead of you. Stress is a choice, one we don’t have to choose.

You have everything you need—all the joy and sadness you have experienced has made you who you are and brought you right to this place. Eliminate the bad, live in the good and don’t allow being overwhelmed to rob you of your happiness that you could be living in. Take a moment for yourself to rejuvenate and choose to think on health, well-being and prosperity.

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5. They take “me time.”

“Take rest; a field that has rested gives a bountiful crop.”

~Ovid~

When you take “me time,” it helps you incorporate free time into your schedule where you spend time taking care of yourself. How well are you doing at taking rest when it is required? Sometimes it boils down to making choices that require eliminating some things to maintain other things. Prioritizing can be a lifesaving practice when done regularly and mindfully.

Breaks are necessary for you to regain perspective, be more creative and ultimately feel good about yourself and the way life is going.  Sometimes what you need is to do is rest. I use Pomodoro to manage my time so that I have a 25 minute timer that buzzes me to take a break. Then I can use it to time my breaks. It all about self-care by taking “me time.”

Featured photo credit: 52.HolidayWindows.Georgetown.WDC.19December2013 by Elvert Barnes via Flickr via flickr.com

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Kim Beasley

CEO/Business Visibility Strategist

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Last Updated on April 25, 2019

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

Shifting careers, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Whether your desire for a career change is self-driven or involuntary, you can manage the panic and fear by understanding ‘why’ you are making the change.

Your ability to clearly and confidently articulate your transferable skills makes it easier for employers to understand how you are best suited for the job or industry.

A well written career change resume that shows you have read the job description and markets your transferable skills can increase your success for a career change.

3 Steps to Prepare Your Mind Before Working on the Resume

Step 1: Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can be an unnerving experience. However, you can lessen the stress by making informed decisions through research.

One of the best ways to do this is by conducting informational interviews.[1] Invest time to gather information from diverse sources. Speaking to people in the career or industry that you’re pursuing will help you get clarity and check your assumptions.

Here are some questions to help you get clear on your career change:

  • What’s your ideal work environment?
  • What’s most important to you right now?
  • What type of people do you like to work with?
  • What are the work skills that you enjoy doing the most?
  • What do you like to do so much that you lose track of time?
  • Whose career inspires you? What is it about his/her career that you admire?
  • What do you dislike about your current role and work environment?

Step 2: Get Clear on What Your Transferable Skills Are[2]

The data gathered from your research and informational interviews will give you a clear picture of the career change that you want. There will likely be a gap between your current experience and the experience required for your desired job. This is your chance to tell your personal story and make it easy for recruiters to understand the logic behind your career change.

Make a list and describe your existing skills and experience. Ask yourself:

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What experience do you have that is relevant to the new job or industry?

Include any experience e.g., work, community, volunteer, or helping a neighbour. The key here is ANY relevant experience. Don’t be afraid to list any tasks that may seem minor to you right now. Remember this is about showcasing the fact that you have experience in the new area of work.

What will the hiring manager care about and how can you demonstrate this?

Based on your research you’ll have an idea of what you’ll be doing in the new job or industry. Be specific and show how your existing experience and skills make you the best candidate for the job. Hiring managers will likely scan your resume in less than 7 seconds. Make it easy for them to see the connection between your skills and the skills that are needed.

Clearly identifying your transferable skills and explaining the rationale for your career change shows the employer that you are making a serious and informed decision about your transition.

Step 3: Read the Job Posting

Each job application will be different even if they are for similar roles. Companies use different language to describe how they conduct business. For example, some companies use words like ‘systems’ while other companies use ‘processes’.

When you review the job description, pay attention to the sections that describe WHAT you’ll be doing and the qualifications/skills. Take note of the type of language and words that the employer uses. You’ll want to use similar language in your resume to show that your experience meets their needs.

5 Key Sections on Your Career Change Resume (Example)

The content of the examples presented below are tailored for a high school educator who wants to change careers to become a client engagement manager, however, you can easily use the same structure for your career change resume.

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Don’t forget to write a well crafted cover letter for your career change to match your updated resume. Your career change cover letter will provide the context and personal story that you’re not able to show in a resume.

1. Contact Information and Header

Create your own letterhead that includes your contact information. Remember to hyperlink your email and LinkedIn profile. Again, make it easy for the recruiter to contact you and learn more about you.

Example:

Jill Young

Toronto, ON | [email protected] | 416.222.2222 | LinkedIn Profile

2. Qualification Highlights or Summary

This is the first section that recruiters will see to determine if you meet the qualifications for the job. Use the language from the job posting combined with your transferable skills to show that you are qualified for the role.

Keep this section concise and use 3 to 4 bullets. Be specific and focus on the qualifications needed for the specific job that you’re applying to. This section should be tailored for each job application. What makes you qualified for the role?

Example:

Qualifications Summary

  • Experienced managing multiple stakeholder interests by building a strong network of relationships to support a variety of programs
  • Experienced at resolving problems in a timely and diplomatic manner
  • Ability to work with diverse groups and ensure collaboration while meeting tight timelines

3. Work Experience

Only present experiences that are relevant to the job posting. Focus on your specific transferable skills and how they apply to the new role.

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How this section is structured will depend on your experience and the type of career change you are making.

For example, if you are changing industries you may want to list your roles before the company name. However, if you want to highlight some of the big companies you’ve worked with then you may want to list the company name first. Just make sure that you are consistent throughout your resume.

Be clear and concise. Use 1 to 4 bullets to highlight your relevant work experiences for each job you list on your resume. Ensure that the information demonstrates your qualifications for the new job. Remember to align all the dates on your resume to the right margin.

Example:

Work Experience

Theater Production Manager 2018 – present

YourLocalTheater

  • Collaborated with diverse groups of people to ensure a successful production while meeting tight timelines

4. Education

List your formal education in this section. For example, the name of the degrees you received and the school who issued it. To eliminate biases, I would recommend removing the year you graduated.

Example:

Education

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  • Bachelor of Education, University of Western Ontario
  • Bachelor of Theater Studies with Honors, University of British Columbia

5. Other Activities or Interests

When you took an inventory of your transferable skills, what experiences were relevant to your new career path (that may not fit in the other resume sections?).

Example:

Other Activities

  • Mentor, Pathways to Education
  • Volunteer lead for coordinating all community festival vendors

Bonus Tips

Remember these core resume tips to help you effectively showcase your transferable skills:

  • CAR (Context Action Result) method. Remember that each bullet on your resume needs to state the situation, the action you took and the result of your experience.
  • Font. Use modern Sans Serif fonts like Tahoma, Verdana, or Arial.
  • White space. Ensure that there is enough white space on your resume by adjusting your margins to a minimum of 1.5 cm. Your resume should be no more than two pages long.
  • Tailor your resume for each job posting. Pay attention to the language and key words used on the job posting and adjust your resume accordingly. Make the application process easy on yourself by creating your own resume template. Highlight sections that you need to tailor for each job application.
  • Get someone else to review your resume. Ideally you’d want to have someone with industry or hiring experience to provide you with insights to hone your resume. However, you also want to have someone proofread your resume for grammar and spelling errors.

The Bottom Line

It’s essential that you know why you want to change careers. Setting this foundation not only helps you with your resume, but can also help you to change your cover letter, adjust your LinkedIn profile, network during your job search, and during interviews.

Ensure that all the content on your resume is relevant for the specific job you’re applying to.

Remember to focus on the job posting and your transferable skills. You have a wealth of experience to draw from – don’t discount any of it! It’s time to showcase and brand yourself in the direction you’re moving towards!

More Resources to Help You Change Career Swiftly

Featured photo credit: Parker Byrd via unsplash.com

Reference

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