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10 Books You Can Read If You Want To Know More About Coffee

10 Books You Can Read If You Want To Know More About Coffee

Here are 10 must-read books, suitable for bean connoisseurs, industry insiders, coffee geeks and those that simply love to wake up to the smell of a freshly roasted cup of Joe. These books are available at most national bookstores, online and in NOOK eBook Reader format.

1. The Blue Bottle Craft of Coffee: Growing, Roasting and Drinking, with Recipes by James Freeman

Suitable for everyone from beginners to geeks and professionals, The Blue Bottle Craft of Coffee discusses coffee in all its aspects, “from farm to cup.” It includes tutorials, covering how to roast the beans and brew the perfect cup using a variety of methods. As the author says, “Making an espresso is a performance that lasts ninety seconds and then you’re done.” So take the time to do it right. It also includes 30 recipes that use coffee in baking, like Coffee Panna Cotta.

Author James Freeman is the founder of Blue Bottle, one of the country’s leading artisan roasters. His wife Caitlin, a nationally known pastry cook, provided the recipes.

2. God in a Cup: the Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee by Michaele Weissman

Trying to figure out who would pay $100 for a pound of coffee? Wonder about the geeks and pros that lead the artisan coffee field? God in a Cup: the Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee will fill you in on the personalities in this highly specialized area of the coffee industry. The author shares the stories of the people at Counter Culture, Intelligentsia, Stump-town and more.

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Michaele Weissman is a freelance journalist and skilled home cook who has written several books. Her articles are regularly published in the Washington Post, New York Times and Wall Street Journal.

3. The World Atlas of Coffee: from Beans to Brewing by James Hoffman

The World Atlas of Coffee: from Beans to Brewing is for both coffee drinkers and industry professionals. Author James Hoffman said of his reason for writing the book, “I wanted to make more coffee accessible rather than make it more mysterious and exclusive.” The books is a global tour, complete with numerous maps, exploring who grows which types of beans, who consumes it, and the cultures involved.

James Hoffman co-founded Square Mile Coffee Roasters in London and is the blogger on Jimseven.

4. Everything But Espresso by Scott Rao

If the science of brewing the ultimate cup of coffee interests you, this is the book to read. Divided into three parts, it starts with coffee extraction and moves on to how to use different brew methods and the importance of using the best water and storing beans the right way.

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Scott Rao, a coffee consultant since 1992, became an author with a goal, “These books are my attempt to give baristas what I had been missing all those years,” when all he could find were coffee books that were descriptive but not practical and relevant for those in the profession.

5. Coffee Life in Japan by Merry White

Japan embraced coffee in the early 1900s. In fact, this interest is what helped to establish the coffee industry in Brazil. The author looks at Japan’s fascination with the brew in terms of social change, pleasure, the uses of public space and how cafes have influenced Japanese culture. In turn, their coffee rituals are impacting the way people in North America and Europe enjoy their coffee.

Merry White has a PhD from Harvard University in Sociology and was Director of the Project on Human Potential at Harvard Graduate School of Education in the 1980s.

6. The Infinite Emotions of Coffee by Alon Y. Halevy

Interested in how coffee has shaped the lives of individuals in cultures around the world? Check out The Infinite Emotions of Coffee. For example, one story tells about the Cup of Excellence awards, the Oscars of Coffee, in Brazil. “Claudio Carneiro Pinto, the owner of Grota Sao Pedro, an organic farm in Minas Gerais, was now being showered with admiration typically reserved in this country for goal-scoring soccer heroes.” The author tells the coffee story with romance and passion.

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Alon Y. Halevy, a former professor of computer science and engineering and currently executive director of the Recruit Institute of Technology in the San Francisco area, is fascinated with the lore of coffee.

7. The East India Company Book of Coffee by Antony Wild

The East India Company Book of Coffee gives caffeine lovers a comprehensive look at the fascinating history of coffee. The author explores the origins of popular blends, the varied methods that have developed for brewing it and how different cultures like to drink theirs.

Antony Wild, a leading British expert on tea and coffee, is an author and broadcaster who has travelled to many of the countries where both are grown.

8. The Birth of Coffee by Daniel Lorenzetti and Linda Rice Lorenzetti

The Birth of Coffee looks at the impact coffee has had around the world. With 100 duotone photos (toned using coffee), this book explores the world’s favorite beverage in all its complexity, from the places and people who grow it to the big business that brings it to market. After reading it, you’ll never consider it a simple cup of coffee again.

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Daniel Lorenzetti is a documentary photographer, explorer and author. He is married to co-author Linda Rice Lorenzetti, Editorial Director of The Image Expedition and author.

9. Espresso Coffee, the Science of Quality edited by Andrea Illy and Rinantonio Viani

If the technology of coffee is your thing, you’ll want Espresso Coffee, the Science of Quality on your bookshelf. Relying on the work of experts, it looks at the chemistry and advanced technology available for espresso. Starting from the beginning, it deals with farming methods and green coffee processing and moves on to how to roast, grind, package and brew.

Andrea Illy is the CEO of illycaffe, a worldwide coffee business. Rinantonio Viani works at Nestle Research Laboratories in Switzerland.

10. 33 Cups of Coffee published by David Selden

After learning so much about the daily grind, here is your chance to record your own coffee experiences. 33 Cups of Coffee, suitable for baristas and other professionals, as well as coffee lovers who appreciate a good cup, is just 3.5” x 5”. It is made to be filled out quickly and easily, with a checklist for the brew method, a flavor wheel, places for when and where you analyzed your cup, notes and rating.

David Selden, owner of publishing house 33 Books Co., his one-man operation, specializes in tasting maps for a range of consumables, including wine, beer and whisky, and of course, coffee.

Featured photo credit: bbAAER via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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Review Your Past Flow

Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

    Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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