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10 quotes by Author Bryce Courtenay that will Inspire you

10 quotes by Author Bryce Courtenay that will Inspire you

Bryce Courtenay was one of the most successful and loved authors of a generation. He began his writing career later in life following a rewarding career in advertising. He was born in South Africa and then studied in London where he met his first wife Benita. They emigrated to Australia in the late 1950s and had three sons.

His youngest son Damon was born with hemophilia; a disease that prevents blood from clotting. He died at the age of 24 on 1st April 1991, from AIDS related complications after contracting HIV, transmitted to him through a blood transfusion. Bryce and his wife divorced in 2000 and Benita died in 2007. Bryce lived in Canberra with his second wife Christine Gee until he died in November 2012 from gastric cancer.

He is most well known for his book The Power of One, which was also made into a film. It started out as a ‘practice’ book. Bryce researched what made a popular author and discovered that most writers achieved success with their fourth book. He planned to write three practice books and publish his fourth. The Power of One was his first manuscript and he used the bulk of paper to prop up a door. A friend asked to read it and sold it to a publisher at a writers’ convention for six figures! He didn’t envisage that his first book would be the first of 21 number one best sellers written in 23 years; selling all up around 25 million books translated into 28 different languages.

He also wrote a book called April Fool’s Day about his son Damon. It was one of his only non fiction books and told us so much about his early life, his career, but mostly his family and their experience dealing with Damon’s illness and his subsequent death. Bryce calls it a love story, but it was so much more.

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He has written many books set in his birth country South Africa and his home country Australia. His vivid historical narrative, his rich and dynamic characters and the humanity in his writing has made him a national treasure in Australia and a popular and successful author world wide. As well as many epic sagas, Bryce Courtenay also wrote short stories and his historical novel Jessica was made into an Australian mini series.

One of the last books published in his name is called The Silver Moon. It is a compilation of reflections and short stories about his life, his writing and his death. Bryce Courtenay was diagnosed with cancer in September 2012 and was told he had only two months to live. He died the following November. He was grateful to have been given the time to reflect deeply upon his life, something he did as habit anyway and ponder the prospect of his looming demise. He was given the opportunity to farewell his family and friends; his beloved pets and his cherished garden.

Bryce Courtenay wrote his grand novels over the course of a year and his books were usually released in November in time for the holiday season, making them the perfect gift. On a number of occasions, I personally received more than one at a time as presents; friends and family knowing I was anticipating his latest release. His advice to writers is outlined in detail in The Silver Moon. He professed to write from the early morning to the evening every single day until the book was finished and said that writing was hard work. He tells writers that if you put in the time, do the research and choose your cherished words carefully, it can be done.

In many ways, for someone who wrote so many profound words and spoke as many, Bryce Courtenay was a simple man. Of himself he said to The Age newspaper in July 1997, as quoted in The Silver Moon:

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‘In the end, if someone says, “Here lies Bryce Courtenay, a storyteller”, my life will have been worthwhile.’

Here are 10 quotes by author Bryce Courtenay that will inspire you:

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                      Diane Koopman

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                      Last Updated on December 2, 2018

                      7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                      7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                      When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

                      You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

                      1. Connecting them with each other

                      Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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                      It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

                      2. Connect with their emotions

                      Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

                      For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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                      3. Keep going back to the beginning

                      Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

                      On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

                      4. Link to your audience’s motivation

                      After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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                      Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

                      5. Entertain them

                      While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

                      Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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                      6. Appeal to loyalty

                      Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

                      In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

                      7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

                      Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

                      Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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