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5 Things You Can Do To Live As Long As The Japanese

5 Things You Can Do To Live As Long As The Japanese

When it comes to living a long life, nobody in the world does it quite like the Japanese. For years now, Japanese people have been the longest-living nationality. Women live to an average age of 87 years, while men live to a hearty age of 81.

The numbers from this small island nation are astounding and it’s even more impressive considering they’re among the heaviest smokers on the planet with 36 percent of the country indulging in tobacco. The U.S., by comparison, only has a 17 percent smoking rate.

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So how do the Japanese live so long? There are a number of factors contributing to their longevity. One of those factors is genetics, but there are several other ways to learn from the Japanese and improve your health and live longer.

Exercise Often

Japanese people might smoke a lot but they make up for it with lots of daily exercise. This exercise isn’t necessarily done by pumping iron at the gym or going to Zumba class regularly. Instead, this exercise is ingrained in the culture and an everyday part of life. It starts at a young age, where 98 percent of children walk or bicycle to school, according to the World Health Organization.

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Staying active is a habit that stays into adulthood, as obesity and its related health problems are uncommon in Japan. The national obesity rate is a mere 3.5 percent, compared to the U.S.’s 30 percent obesity rate.

Devour Fish

The staple of a Japanese diet is fish and studies have shown that there are a number of health benefits to regular consumption. Fish is eaten regularly, and the red meats popular in many other countries are far less common in Japan. Of course, there are problems with eating fish (like too much mercury), but the lack of cholesterol seems to have tremendous health benefits.

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Keep Calories Down

Even though fish is an important component of the Japanese healthy eating habits there are also  other significant parts of the diet. Dairy is rarely eaten. Instead, lots of vegetables, rice and herbal teas make up a large portion of the menu. Of course, there are decadently fried foods like tempura but those aren’t usually eaten as often as the healthier (and cheaper) alternatives.

Stay Active After Retirement

The Japanese defy typical life expectancy despite the incredible amounts of stress they experience in their professional lives. Studies differ, but it’s widely conceded that Japan is one of the most stressed workforces around.

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Despite that high stress, many retirement-age workers decide to keep working. It’s not because they need the money. In many cases, it’s simply because they find the work rewarding and stimulating. The retirement age is fairly low at 60, but government statistics show that 1 in 5 people older than 65 are employed. That sense of purpose seems to pay off in a person’s later years.

Enroll in Insurance

There’s lots of talk about how the Japanese manage to live so long, but one of the main reasons is obvious. The country has affordable universal healthcare that’s available to everyone. No system is perfect and without its problems but the Japanese style of healthcare is largely considered a net positive when it comes to keeping its people healthy.

The Japanese system goes to show how important it is to be covered under proper health insurance. Consider investing as much as you can afford to ensure you receive decent care.

Live Long Like the Japanese

There’s not only one reason why the Japanese have a longer life expectancy than any other nation. Instead, it’s a number of lifestyle choices that seem to pay off in the later years. Adopting some of these features into your own life could bring you similar benefits.

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Anum Yoon

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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