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5 Things You Can Do To Live As Long As The Japanese

5 Things You Can Do To Live As Long As The Japanese

When it comes to living a long life, nobody in the world does it quite like the Japanese. For years now, Japanese people have been the longest-living nationality. Women live to an average age of 87 years, while men live to a hearty age of 81.

The numbers from this small island nation are astounding and it’s even more impressive considering they’re among the heaviest smokers on the planet with 36 percent of the country indulging in tobacco. The U.S., by comparison, only has a 17 percent smoking rate.

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So how do the Japanese live so long? There are a number of factors contributing to their longevity. One of those factors is genetics, but there are several other ways to learn from the Japanese and improve your health and live longer.

Exercise Often

Japanese people might smoke a lot but they make up for it with lots of daily exercise. This exercise isn’t necessarily done by pumping iron at the gym or going to Zumba class regularly. Instead, this exercise is ingrained in the culture and an everyday part of life. It starts at a young age, where 98 percent of children walk or bicycle to school, according to the World Health Organization.

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Staying active is a habit that stays into adulthood, as obesity and its related health problems are uncommon in Japan. The national obesity rate is a mere 3.5 percent, compared to the U.S.’s 30 percent obesity rate.

Devour Fish

The staple of a Japanese diet is fish and studies have shown that there are a number of health benefits to regular consumption. Fish is eaten regularly, and the red meats popular in many other countries are far less common in Japan. Of course, there are problems with eating fish (like too much mercury), but the lack of cholesterol seems to have tremendous health benefits.

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Keep Calories Down

Even though fish is an important component of the Japanese healthy eating habits there are also  other significant parts of the diet. Dairy is rarely eaten. Instead, lots of vegetables, rice and herbal teas make up a large portion of the menu. Of course, there are decadently fried foods like tempura but those aren’t usually eaten as often as the healthier (and cheaper) alternatives.

Stay Active After Retirement

The Japanese defy typical life expectancy despite the incredible amounts of stress they experience in their professional lives. Studies differ, but it’s widely conceded that Japan is one of the most stressed workforces around.

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Despite that high stress, many retirement-age workers decide to keep working. It’s not because they need the money. In many cases, it’s simply because they find the work rewarding and stimulating. The retirement age is fairly low at 60, but government statistics show that 1 in 5 people older than 65 are employed. That sense of purpose seems to pay off in a person’s later years.

Enroll in Insurance

There’s lots of talk about how the Japanese manage to live so long, but one of the main reasons is obvious. The country has affordable universal healthcare that’s available to everyone. No system is perfect and without its problems but the Japanese style of healthcare is largely considered a net positive when it comes to keeping its people healthy.

The Japanese system goes to show how important it is to be covered under proper health insurance. Consider investing as much as you can afford to ensure you receive decent care.

Live Long Like the Japanese

There’s not only one reason why the Japanese have a longer life expectancy than any other nation. Instead, it’s a number of lifestyle choices that seem to pay off in the later years. Adopting some of these features into your own life could bring you similar benefits.

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Anum Yoon

Writer & Journalist

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Last Updated on September 25, 2019

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

As it appears, the human mind is not capable of not thinking, at least on the subconscious level. Our mind is always occupied by thoughts, whether we want to or not, and they influence our every action.

When we were still children, our thoughts seemed to be purely positive. Have you ever been around a 4-year old who doesn’t like a painting he or she drew? I haven’t. Instead, I see glee, exciting and pride in children’s eyes. But as the years go by, we clutter our mind with doubts, fears and self-deprecating thoughts.

Just imagine then, how much we limit ourselves in every aspect of our lives if we give negative thoughts too much power!

We’ll never go after that job we’ve always wanted because our nay-saying thoughts make us doubt our abilities.

We’ll never ask that person we like out on a date because we always think we’re not good enough.

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We’ll never risk quitting our job in order to pursue the life and the work of our dreams because we can’t get over our mental barrier that insists we’re too weak, too unimportant and too dumb.

We’ll never lose those pounds that risk our health because we believe we’re not capable of pushing our limits.

And we’ll never be able to fully see our inner potential because we simply don’t dare to question the voices in our head…

But enough is enough! It’s time to stop these limiting beliefs and come to a place of sanity, love and excitement about life, work and ourselves.

So, how can we tap into the power of positivity?

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“Happiness cannot come from without, it comes from within.” – Helen Keller

It’s not as hard as it may seem; you just have to practice, practice, practice. Here are 4 simple yet powerful ideas on how you can get started.

1. Learn to substitute every negative thought with a positive one.

Every time a negative thought crawls into your mind, replace it with a positive thought. It’s just like someone writes a phrase you don’t like on a blackboard and then you get up, erase it and write something much more to your liking.

Just take a look at these 10 Positive Affirmations for Success that will Change your Life.

2. See the positive side of every situation, even when you are surrounded by pure negativity.

This one is a bit harder to put into practice, which does not mean it’s impossible.

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You can find positivity in everything by mentally holding on to something positive, whether this be family, friends, your faith, nature, someone’s sparkling eyes or whatever other glimmer of beauty.

If you seek it, you will find it.

3. At least once a day, take a moment and think of 5 things you are grateful for.

This will lighten your mood and give you some perspective of what really is important in life and how many blessings surround you already.

Here’re 60 Things To Be Thankful For In Life that can inspire you.

4. Change the mental images you allow to enter your mind.

How you see yourself and your surroundings make a huge difference to your thinking.

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Instead of dwelling on dark, negative thoughts, consciously build and focus on positive, light and colorful images, thoughts and situations in your mind a few times a day.

Learn from this article how to change your mental images: How to Think Positive and Eliminate Negative Thoughts

If you are persistent and keep on working on yourself, your mind will automatically reject its negative thoughts and welcome the positive ones.

And remember:

You are (or will become) what you think you are.

This is reasonable enough to be proactive about whatever is going on in your head.

More About Staying Positive

Featured photo credit: Lauren Richmond via unsplash.com

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