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After Professional Sports: Where Are They Now?

After Professional Sports: Where Are They Now?

Professional athletes live in the limelight. The media keeps us up to date with their lives throughout their careers. But, what we don’t know is what happens when they set aside their sports careers. Let’s take a look at the lives of professional athletes, after professional sports.

Injuries can be severe, lingering even after the players are done with professional sports

Sports professionals have it made. High dollar salaries, popularity, and sometimes eternal fame in the hearts of their fans. The glory of sports has a price. Many are plagued by injury after professional sports. The NFL is one of the best examples of this — players take so many blows to the head they often suffer from memory loss or dementia. In fact, they are 19 times more likely to develop these conditions than the average person. They have taken more precautions after players filed a class action lawsuit against the league, yet so many suffered from injuries they were forced to pay a large sum to the complainants.

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    Cristiano Ronaldo after scoring a goal

    Many become philanthropic

    The large sums of money garnered by over-sized stadiums and lucrative contracts allow the players to be charitable in their retirement, or during their career. Cristiano Ronaldo famously paid for a dying boy’s medical treatment after he asked for a pair of shoes before he died. Many of the wealthiest players have become pillars of their communities, while there are a few who wind up in the press with one legal issue or another — your coworkers might too if they were professional sports players.

    Some go broke

    Mike Tyson was once a world champion boxer that took in 30 million dollars for one fight. As his career declined however, he spent his fortune and eventually went bankrupt. We’ve seen this from other stars as well, but none have rebounded as effectively as Tyson. After biting off the ear of an opponent in one fight, he went on to cameo in The Hangover trilogy. However, Tyson is not the best role model for your children — he was once quoted in a press conference as saying “I’ll eat your children.”

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      Mike Tyson at a recent press conference

      They never leave the field, mat, or quidditch pitch

      Did you know quidditch is a real sport now? Seriously, look it up — they hold a US World Cup, though it should be called a national cup as there are only American teams and it’s held in the States. If you’ve played sports for as long as a professional player, you will know that the sport will always be in you. Whether you’re a wrestler that takes well to an octagon, or a rugby player that finds himself in the NFL, sports will enrich your life. Many find themselves coaching young players that will become what they used to be.

      professional sports
        Sonny Bill Williams

        The turnover rate is insane — you might already know a former professional sports player

        You can’t retire at 65 from a football team. As long as you can perform well enough to keep up with people in their early 20s, you might have a job. Not every sport is as grueling on the body as football. Gary Player from South Africa has the distinction of being the only pro golfer that isn’t American to achieve a career grand slam. Gary played into his 70s. You really can’t ask more from life than golfing for a job till you’re in your old age. That’s likely what he had planned for his retirement anyways.

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          Legends of Golf in Savannah, GA April 19, 2010

          Where are they now?

          If you feel like you haven’t seen your favorite player in some time, whether they haven’t been listed in a news article, or their faces aren’t on the television anymore, you might want to go to a stadium or venue. Your childhood idol has not died — trust me, the media would have told you. If you don’t want to wait for a sighting when they are entered into a hall of fame or other honorary museum, you might want to go to the place where they used to play. Most of them have stayed in the city that cheered for them in some way. They might just return to visit a past glory, or they might be everywhere you look (even on your shoe)!

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            Featured photo credit: tableanty via flickr.com

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            Last Updated on October 15, 2019

            Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

            Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed

            Procrastination is very literally the opposite of productivity. To produce something is to pull it forward, while to procrastinate is to push it forward — to tomorrow, to next week, or ultimately to never.

            Procrastination fills us with shame — we curse ourselves for our laziness, our inability to focus on the task at hand, our tendency to be easily led into easier and more immediate gratifications. And with good reason: for the most part, time spent procrastinating is time spent not doing things that are, in some way or other, important to us.

            There is a positive side to procrastination, but it’s important not to confuse procrastination at its best with everyday garden-variety procrastination.

            Sometimes — sometimes! — procrastination gives us the time we need to sort through a thorny issue or to generate ideas. In those rare instances, we should embrace procrastination — even as we push it away the rest of the time.

            Why we procrastinate after all

            We procrastinate for a number of reasons, some better than others. One reason we procrastinate is that, while we know what we want to do, we need time to let the ideas “ferment” before we are ready to sit down and put them into action.

            Some might call this “creative faffing”; I call it, following copywriter Ray Del Savio’s lead, “concepting”.[1]

            Whatever you choose to call it, it’s the time spent dreaming up what you want to say or do, weighing ideas in your mind, following false leads and tearing off on mental wild goose chases, and generally thinking things through.

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            To the outside observer, concepting looks like… well, like nothing much at all. Maybe you’re leaning back in your chair, feet up, staring at the wall or ceiling, or laying in bed apparently dozing, or looking out over the skyline or feeding pigeons in the park or fiddling with the Japanese vinyl toys that stand watch over your desk.

            If ideas are the lifeblood of your work, you have to make time for concepting, and you have to overcome the sensation— often overpowering in our work-obsessed culture — that faffing, however creative, is not work.

            So, is procrastination bad?

            Yes it is.

            Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you’re “concepting” when in fact you’re just not sure what you’re supposed to be doing.

            Spending an hour staring at the wall while thinking up the perfect tagline for a marketing campaign is creative faffing; staring at the wall for an hour because you don’t know how to come up with a tagline, or don’t know the product you’re marketing well enough to come up with one, is just wasting time.

            Lack of definition is perhaps the biggest friend of your procrastination demons. When we’re not sure what to do — whether because we haven’t planned thoroughly enough, we haven’t specified the scope of what we hope to accomplish in the immediate present, or we lack important information, skills, or resources to get the job done.

            It’s easy to get distracted or to trick ourselves into spinning our wheels doing nothing. It takes our mind off the uncomfortable sensation of failing to make progress on something important.

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            The answer to this is in planning and scheduling. Rather than giving yourself an unspecified length of time to perform an unspecified task (“Let’s see, I guess I’ll work on that spreadsheet for a while”) give yourself a limited amount of time to work on a clearly defined task (“Now I’ll enter the figures from last months sales report into the spreadsheet for an hour”).

            Giving yourself a deadline, even an artificial one, helps build a sense of urgency and also offers the promise of time to “screw around” later, once more important things are done.

            For larger projects, planning plays a huge role in whether or not you’ll spend too much time procrastinating to reach the end reasonably quickly.

            A good plan not only lists the steps you have to take to reach the end, but takes into account the resources, knowledge and inputs from other people you’re going to need to perform those steps.

            Instead of futzing around doing nothing because you don’t have last month’s sales report, getting the report should be a step in the project.

            Otherwise, you’ll spend time cooling your heels, justifying your lack of action as necessary: you aren’t wasting time because you want to, but because you have to.

            How bad procrastination can be

            Our mind can often trick us into procrastinating, often to the point that we don’t realize we’re procrastinating at all.

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            After all, we have lots and lots of things to do; if we’re working on something, aren’t we being productive – even if the one big thing we need to work on doesn’t get done?

            One way this plays out is that we scan our to-do list, skipping over the big challenging projects in favor of the short, easy projects. At the end of the day, we feel very productive: we’ve crossed twelve things off our list!

            That big project we didn’t work on gets put onto the next day’s list, and when the same thing happens, it gets moved forward again. And again.

            Big tasks often present us with the problem above – we aren’t sure what to do exactly, so we look for other ways to occupy ourselves.

            In many cases too, big tasks aren’t really tasks at all; they’re aggregates of many smaller tasks. If something’s sitting on your list for a long time, each day getting skipped over in favor of more immediately doable tasks, it’s probably not very well thought out.

            You’re actively resisting it because you don’t really know what it is. Try to break it down into a set of small tasks, something more like the tasks you are doing in place of the one big task you aren’t doing.

            More consequences of procrastination can be found in this article:

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            8 Dreadful Effects of Procrastination That Can Destroy Your Life

            Procrastination, a technical failure

            Procrastination is, more often than not, a sign of a technical failure, not a moral failure.

            It’s not because we’re bad people that we procrastinate. Most times, procrastination serves as a symptom of something more fundamentally wrong with the tasks we’ve set ourselves.

            It’s important to keep an eye on our procrastinating tendencies, to ask ourselves whenever we notice ourselves pushing things forward what it is about the task we’ve set ourselves that simply isn’t working for us.

            Featured photo credit: chuttersnap via unsplash.com

            Reference

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