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5 Free Tools For Creating Eye-Catching Blog Headers

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5 Free Tools For Creating Eye-Catching Blog Headers

What’s the first thing someone sees when browsing a blog? Easy, the title and, maybe even before that, the blog header.

The blog header is the perfect accompaniment to your post. It sets the tone of the post before you even start reading. A blog post without an attractive blog header is the same as wearing an outfit without any accessories -functional, but plain lacking. Since experts agree that visual content is king, you don’t want to miss out on using visual elements in your blog posts.

Even if you’re not a designer, creating beautiful blog headers isn’t difficult. All you need is the right tools. Here are 5 free tools for making eye-catching blog headers.

1. Picasa

Difficulty: Easy to Medium.

Picasa is an image editing program by Google. This tool imports pictures from your personal library and allows you to resize, edit and adjust them. There is a selection of pre-set filters with adjustable opacity and lightness, and effects can be layered on top of each other. Adjusting the image’s dimensions is a bit annoying, however you can crop an image but not make it larger. Picasa also does not have its own stock photo library. To use an image, you will need to find it externally and import it into the tool.

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To use Picasa, you need to download the tool. When your design is complete, you can upload it directly from the tool to your Google Photos.

picasa

    2. Venngage

    Difficulty: Easy

    Venngage has a selection of blog header templates that are highly customizable. Once you choose a template, it’s easy to adjust the dimensions, font style, size and placement, color palette, and images. Venngage has a library of over 500,000 stock images and icons to choose from, meaning you don’t have to search for images externally. If you do want to use your own images, though, there is an import function. Venngage gives you full control over the placement of icons, color washes, text placement and size, and more, and adjusting elements after they’ve been applied is easy.

    To use Venngage, you need to create an account. Signing up and using the tool is free, but if you want to download your graphic you will need to upgrade to a premium account. You can still upload your graphic to your site and get an embed code without upgrading, though.

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    venngage

      3. PicMonkey

      Difficulty: Easy

      PicMonkey allows you to import your own images into the tool, as it does not have its own stock image library. You can either specify your own image dimensions or choose from pre-set dimensions, but when you upload a photo it will automatically fit to the file’s size and you will have to manually adjust. The tool offers pre-set filters with adjustable strength and brightness, and a library of fonts. There is an icons collection but you can only place icons on top of the image.

      You do not need to make an account to use PicMonkey. You can download the file straight to your computer.

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      picmonkey

        4. Pixlr

        Difficulty: Medium

        Pixlr is a web app that allows you to import your own image and edit it. Pixlr is unique because it keeps track of the layers used on the image in a bar on the side. The tool does not have an image or icons library, but it does have a collection of fonts to choose from. You can also select from a drop-down list of preset filters. A unique feature of Pixlr is that it can be translated into 28 different languages, making it accessible to users all over the world.

        Of the 5 tools, Pixlr is the least intuitive to use. It requires some playing around first to figure out the functions. That being said, you do not need to make an account to use Pixlr and to download your file to your computer.

        pixlr

          5. Fotor

          Difficulty: Easy

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          Fotor is an image editing web app that can also be downloaded to your mobile device. The tool offers a selection of header templates to choose from, but you can also import your own images and adjust the dimensions. You can choose from a collection of pre-set filters and adjust the brightness and hue of the image. A unique feature of Fotor is the “Color Splash” tool which allows you to choose a color wash and then “brush in” to reveal the color underneath. While Fotor does offer a collection of stickers to decorate your image, you can’t control their opacity or layering.

          To use Fotor, you need to create an account either on the site or through Facebook. From there you can download your file straight to your computer.

          fotor

            Never underestimate the importance of a good blog header in enticing people to read your blog posts. Look at it like the packaging on a product you are trying to sell. With these tools, you will be able to create beautiful blog headers, even if you are a novice designer.

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            Sara McGuire

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            Last Updated on November 25, 2021

            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

            There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

            Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

              What Does Private Browsing Do?

              When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

              For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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              The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

              The Terminal Archive

              While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

              Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

              dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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              Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

              Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

              However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

              Clearing Your Tracks

              Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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              dscacheutil -flushcache

              As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

              Other Browsers and Private Browsing

              Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

              If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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              As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

              Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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