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Study Finds Sarcastic People Are More Creative And Intelligent

Study Finds Sarcastic People Are More Creative And Intelligent

We’ve long suspected that sarcasm equals a larger than normal intelligence. I mean come on, those snarky comeback don’t write themselves, if you smell what I’m stepping in. Luckily ,Harvard and Columbia Universities have done the legwork for us and conducted a study to verify our expectations.

How The Study Was Conducted

People were divided into three groups. Those that expressed themselves sarcastically, earnestly, and neutrally. Researchers interacted with the different groups requesting creative tasks to be completed. Then judged how the tasks were completed.

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Findings

The sarcastic group showed “enhanced creativity.” When faced with creative problems, they were able to come up with creative solutions. They were able to think abstractly and to take a different spin.

Drawing Conclusions: Intelligence and Sarcasm

A sarcastic person often is looking outside the box to draw conclusions and express opinions. This is why some believe that intelligence is linked to sarcasm in the first place. If you have to look at things in new ways, then you are more likely to look for new solutions to problems. If you know that you might have a little different way of communicating you may look for social openings to communicate that way. This shows an emotional intelligence as well, if you are able to tone down your replies to better match to the situation you are in.

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The Bummer Side: Creating Conflict

If you speak sarcasm to a person that doesn’t communicate that way, you are more likely to create conflict. Even if you speak sarcasm to sarcasm, there could still be a conflict unless a certain trust with that person has been established. That means you may want to make sure that people are on your same page before unloading all your fantastic wit on them. I mean you should really do that anyway. No need to waste your grade “A” material on someone who doesn’t appreciate it.

Sarcasm Requires a Speaker or Listener

Something to keep in mind is that the intelligence is in the speaker and the listener. The speaker does looking outside the box to communicate. The listener has to put together the bread crumbs to see where things are coming from and judge the tone of the conversation. Facial reactions are judged, as well as vocal tones to establish if the person is being genuine. This is why sarcasm is so hard to read through texts (even with emojis) because there is no way to judge the persons intent. Does she really mean that smiley face? Or was she just covering?

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A Final Study Takeaway

The study says that the people in the study “demonstrated enhanced creativity following a simulated sarcastic conversation or after recalling a sarcastic exchange.” This means that communications in this way get our creative juices going especially when they are had with people that communicate in the same way.

The important thing to take away from this study is that yes, if you are sarcastic you probably have a large chance of increased intelligence. Sarcasm is not the preferable method for communication in “new friend” situations though. It’s a way to communicate once trust has been established. Unloading the brunt of your sarcasm on someone that is unsuspecting can damage the relationship before it starts.

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Please take a look at the following links for additional information:

Lori Chandler gives some hilarious commentary and historical examples of sarcasm. She explores the meaning of the study more indepth. http://bigthink.com/ideafeed/im-so-sorry-my-sarcasm-is-making-me-more-creative

Additionally this link will take you the actual study to draw your own conclusions.

Featured photo credit: Suit and Tie/johnhope14 via flickr.com

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

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How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

3. Get comfortable with discomfort

One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

4. See failure as a teacher

Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

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Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

5. Take baby steps

Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

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The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

6. Hang out with risk takers

There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

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9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

10. Focus on the fun

Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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