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15 Jobs That Pay Well But Hurt Your Health

15 Jobs That Pay Well But Hurt Your Health

There are several jobs available today that can bring in the big bucks, but could be dangerous to your health. Let’s take a look at 15 of these jobs and why they’re so dangerous. If you’re currently employed in one of these occupations, you may want to rethink your job… or invest in life insurance.

1. Nurses

These medical professionals are dealing with many sick people on a day-to-day basis, and not to mention, it is a very stressful job. Any illness that is contagious can get passed around, and if you are working many long hours your immune system will be compromised, making it easy for you to get ill.

2. Service Unit Operators

These are the men and women who are working in the oil, gas, and coal mining industries. They are exposed to many contaminants in the air and they are at a higher chance of receiving burns, cuts, scrapes, and more. They probably make a few trips to the ER, and with rising healthcare costs feel like they need someone to blame. According to a study on BambooHR, it’s the government.

3. Airline Pilots and Copilots

Pilots and copilots are at a high risk for many problems that come from sitting for long periods of time. Because they are in a stationary position for so long, it can be bad for their circulation and eventually bad on the heart. They are also at a high risk of being obese from sitting, and they do experience some radiation exposure.

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4. Immigration and Customs Inspectors

Immigration and customs inspectors are the ones that are in charge of inspecting people, goods, and more when they come into the country. They are exposed to thousands of people a day, giving them a high rate of illness exposure, not to mention certain contaminants that they may come across in boxes, bags, or crates.

5. Refuse and Recyclable Material Collectors

The men and women who collect all of the recyclable materials from home, businesses, and other buildings can lead a dangerous lifestyle. They are exposed to a number of unknown contaminants, some diseases and other things, and they do sit a lot on the job. It is a surprisingly harmful job that many people would not think about right away.

6. Radiologists and Nuclear Technicians

These medical professionals have a different level of harm when they are on the job. They deal with radioactive tests and materials on a daily basis. Radiologists sit a lot during the day and read imaging exams, while nuclear technicians are mixing radioactive isotopes that are used in certain exams, leaving them open to a high amount of radiation exposure.

7. Surgeons and Surgical Technicians

Surgeons have a very stressful job. They work long hours, sometimes odd hours, and they deal with very intricate procedures. This can lead to a lot of stress outside of work, which leads to serious medical conditions. They, and their technicians, are also exposed to a lot of contaminants and certain illnesses and diseases that can be unsavory.

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8. Anesthesiologists, Nurse Anesthetists, and Anesthesiologist Assistants

Because they work in surgery, they too have odd hours and long hours, and they carry a lot of the same risk as other medical professions. But they also can suffer side effects from the drugs they use to put their patients under because they are around them all day, leaving them sleepy at times.

9. Flight Attendants

Unlike pilots, they do not sit for long periods of time, but they are exposed to radiation as well. Not only that, but they deal more with people, leaving them open to illnesses and viruses that anyone on the flight has.

10. Histotechnologists and histologic technicians

Histotechnologists prepare slides for pathologists to look at diagnose. But in doing so, they are exposed to many contaminants and use sharp instruments to do there work. They also need to do small, detail-oriented work, involving intricate movements of the hand which can cause injuries to the hand and wrist.

11. Derrick operators (oil and gas)

These professionals have a high rate of exposure to contaminants when they are on the job. They also have a high rate of suffering from cuts, burns, or other on the job site industries.

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12. Nuclear Equipment Operation Technicians

These people work in the nuclear energy business and they are the ones that release, control, and use this energy to help anyone researching or working with it in certain activities. It leads to a high risk of radiation exposure as well as being around many hazardous materials.

13. Refractory Materials Repairers

Anyone working in this industry, as someone who repairs furnaces, kilns, ovens, and more is at a high risk of contaminants and hazardous fumes and materials. They also have a high rate of cuts and burns.

14. Dentists and dental assistants

Dentists are exposed to a lot of viruses and other diseases since they are working in close proximity to the mouths of many people. They are also around many different contaminants throughout the day and sit for long periods of time.

15. Veterinarians

Working with animals brings around risk as well. Vets are open to being bit, scratched, stung, or more from any animal they work with. Not to mention all the diseases they see on a daily basis, as well as infections of all sorts.

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Just because work is dangerous, it doesn’t mean that it isn’t meaningful and fulfilling. Many people in these occupations love what they do, and the risks are minimal in their eyes. If you work in one of these professions, make sure you’re following all of the safety rules and paying attention to your surroundings. Take extra precautions to protect yourself and others around you.

Featured photo credit: lalabell68 via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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