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10 Valuable Lessons We Can Learn From Disney Movies

10 Valuable Lessons We Can Learn From Disney Movies

For decades, Disney movies, both animated and live-action, have touched the lives of children and adults alike. If you watched Disney movies as a kid, you probably paid more attention to the songs, bright colors and action sequences (if applicable).

Watching them as an adult, though (don’t lie – you know you do it), you’ve probably realized these movies have buried deep within them valuable life lessons you never even knew you were learning throughout your childhood. Here are 10 of those movies. You might have to watch them again, one right after the other in marathon fashion, to see the lessons played out in real time.

Cinderella

Not everyone will approve of what you do or the dreams fluttering inside your heart. You have to find the courage to chase those dreams no matter who tries to stop you. It’s not always possible to do this alone, however. Sometimes you need a little help to get to where you want to go.

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Peter Pan

Growing up is scary, filled with responsibilities we’re not sure we’re ready to adopt. Just because you’re growing older, though, doesn’t mean you have to let your playful imagination fade away. There’s nothing wrong with believing in dreams or far-off fairytales. Your inner child will always be there when you’re running low on faith.

The Lion King

Your past will always be there lurking in the shadows. It’s tough not to look over your shoulder and think about it. Instead of running from it and trying to leave it behind you, run toward it. Face it head-on. Overcoming a bad memory isn’t easy, but once you’re standing on the other side of it, you’ll realize you’re a better person for it.

Air Bud

Stand up for your friends and stick close to your family. Helping those who have helped you when you were in need is what friendship is all about. Those loyal to you will stand behind you no matter the situation. Whether it be a teammate, a parent or a golden retriever, team work never, ever fails.

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Lilo & Stitch

Everyone has their own definition of family. You don’t have to be related by blood to someone to care for and love them. Okay, so maybe your dog is actually a distant alien species, but that doesn’t mean you should love him any less. What really makes a family is what its members are willing to do for each other in times of both trouble and triumph.

Holes

One mistake doesn’t make you a bad person. There is always good to come of the unfortunate things that happen to us, and always something to learn from every negative experience. Who you really are just might be buried beneath the surface, waiting to be found.

Ice Princess

Deep down, you already know what you were born to do. It’s the same dream you’ve had since you were young. As you’ve grown older, maybe you’ve tried to set it aside, to focus on things you and those around you feel are more important. Never let go of what you’ve always known you wanted most. Even if it means giving up what you’ve worked to achieve, it’s worth pursuing the true ambition that captured your heart from the start.

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The Princess and the Frog

Achieving your life-long dreams doesn’t come without hardship. Along the way, you’ll run into all sorts of obstacles and roadblocks. Maybe not quite as drastic as transforming into a frog, but close enough. Take on those obstacles as they come and do your best to overcome them.

Tangled

The only person who gets to decide how you live your life is you. You can’t miss out on all the world has to offer you by letting other people hold you back. If you want to venture outside your comfort zone, do it. If there’s a question you’ve always had and want to find the answer, get out there and find it. Your dreams are so much more important than the dreams other people might have in mind for you.

Frozen

Everyone has a gift. Maybe you’re good at something no one else can do, and no one seems to understand the true value it has brought to your life. You don’t have to hide it or ignore it because it means something different to you than to everyone around you. Embrace it. Let go of your fear of judgment and isolation. If you can show the world you’re proud of what you can do, they’ll start to look at things differently, too.

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The older you get, the more you’ll be able to appreciate everything these movies have taught you over the years. With more Disney magic on the way for years to come, there’s still plenty more to learn.

Featured photo credit: Richard Stephenson via flickr.com

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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