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Breastfeeding Reduces The Risk Of Having Breast Cancer, Study Finds

Breastfeeding Reduces The Risk Of Having Breast Cancer, Study Finds

Science Daily recently published an article during Breast Cancer Awareness Month regarding the association between breastfeeding and a reduced risk of aggressive breast cancer that was sourced by the American Cancer Society. The results indicate that breastfeeding is becoming a scientifically supported way to reduce the risk of breast cancer. Studies have been finding that breastfeeding your child can reduce the risk of breast cancer by up to 20%. That’s a major breakthrough in cancer prevention!

HRN and what it means

Scientists have found that breastfeeding can specifically reduce the development of a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer, hormone-receptor-negative or HRN. This form of breast cancer is very likely to be life-threatening and makes up 20% of all breast cancer diagnoses. There are many factors that contribute to the development of HRN including BRACA1 gene mutation, obesity, and multiple early pregnancies, among others. Unfortunately, it is women with these multiple risk factors that are least likely to breastfeed.

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What makes these cancers so dangerous?

HRN breast cancer lacks receptors for estrogen or progesterone, and about 2/3 of those diagnosed also lack receptors for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). When the cancer lacks receptors for all three it is considered a Triple Negative (TN). Both HRN and TN are considered deadly for several reasons. These types of breast cancer are more likely to be diagnosed in their later stages, do not respond to as many treatments, and have fewer treatment options to cure them. Because HRN and TN lack several hormone receptors, medications that target these receptors are not effective.

How can breastfeeding help?

Luckily, there is a safe, accessible, and fairly low-cost way to create long-lasting protection against HRN. In the article published on Science Daily, the American Cancer Society says “This work highlights the need for more public health strategies that directly inform women and girls about the maternal (and fetal) benefits of breastfeeding before and during a woman’s child-bearing years. It’s also important for these women to have the message reinforced by their healthcare professionals.”

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It’s wonderful to discover that such a beautiful mother-child bond can also help keep mommy healthy and possibly save her life. But what is it about breastfeeding that can help save lives? Breastcancer.org cites several ways that breastfeeding can help. Producing milk 24/7 helps to limit the cells’ ability to “misbehave,” fewer menstrual cycles while mommy is breastfeeding causes lower estrogen levels, and mommies who are breastfeeding tend to eat healthier and live healthier as well. However, Breastcancer.org says something very interesting about the length of time needed to lower the risk of cancer: “Breastfeeding can lower breast cancer risk, especially if a woman breastfeeds for longer than 1 year. There is less benefit for women who breastfeed for less than a year, which is more typical for women living in countries such as the United States.”

Pregnant women and younger mothers are very receptive to making healthy choices for themselves and their babies. If women are encouraged to breastfeed, it might lead to better health for both the baby and mommy. If the stigma of breastfeeding in places such as work or school is also removed, it might make breastfeeding more comfortable for new mothers while out in public.

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More research still needs to be conducted, but so far the results have been very encouraging. With such a safe and easy way to reduce the risk of breast cancer, women who are able to breastfeed should try and do so. “All approaches will be necessary in order to protect the most women against the devastation of breast cancer over their lifetimes,” says Farhad Islami, M.D., Ph.D., Director of Interventions, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society.

Featured photo credit: Chris Alban Hansen via flickr.com

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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