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You’ll Be Amazed How Artists Created An Immersive Experience For All Ages

You’ll Be Amazed How Artists Created An Immersive Experience For All Ages

Words alone cannot describe The House of Eternal Return. It’s unique, groundbreaking, unparalleled: a massive immersive art experience for exploration, play and adventure. Meow Wolf, an art collective, created the production. It will go live early in 2016, in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

You enter a Gothic house reminiscent of the novels of HP Lovecraft. Artifacts and decor introduce you to the personalities of those who lived there. You open a closet door. It’s a portal to another dimension awaiting exploration. You get out of your head and into another reality by climbing and crawling. You go through a dystopian shanty town, or a landscape of the future. The time travel entertains all ages.

The artists believe that life is not just serious, but also can be playful, celebratory and just plain fun.

The collective of over a hundred artists was founded in 2008. 25,000 people visited, Due Return, commissioned by the Santa Fe Center for Contemporary Art. Meow Wolf did installations in twenty-two cities across the US. Then they settled on their current permanent installation project.

George R. R. Martin, the creator of King of Thrones, invested 3 million dollars to renovate a former bowling alley. This will house the exhibit. Low-cost art studios, a gift shop selling works of local artists and an arts learning center run by a local non-profit will also be in the building. The outdoor parking area will showcase live band performances.

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Before it becomes an international phenomenon, let’s take a peek under the hood to see how The House of Eternal Return is created. In the photos below, you’ll delight in the colors and forms.

The most interesting part of many of these inventions is that they are interactive and serve multiple functions. For example the “Glow Mastodon” will be reactive to touch and will make sounds when you play the ribcage like an instrument. The “Interactive Mushrooms” change color when you tap them. To me the difference between interactive and decorative is significant, especially when describing the type of work Meow Wolf does.

Most of the scenes shown below from the Life Is Beautiful Festival will be in The House of Eternal Return.

 Creations Shown At Life Is Beautiful Festival, Las Vegas, Nevada, 2015

Projections, Jake Snider

    Projections, Jake Snider

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    Interactive mushrooms,Life is Beautiful fest

      Interactive Mushrooms, Caity Kennedy (collaborative)

      Art Motel, Life is Beautiful fest

        Art Motel, collaborative mural

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        Assemblage, Caity Kennedy

          Assemblage, Caity Kennedy

                            Newly Designed

          Robot, Christian Ristow

            Robot, Christian Ristow

            Space pod, Dale Bradley

              Space Pod, Dale Bradley

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              Mastodon skeleton, Mat Crimmins

                Glow Mastodon Skeleton, Dale Crimmins (collaborative)

                Forest creature sculptures, Sarah Bradley

                  Forest Creatures, Sarah Bradley

                  I hope that you are as excited as I and can’t wait ’till it opens to visit. See you at The House of Eternal Return!

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                  1The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works) 240 Top Productivity Apps for iPhone (2018 Updated) 3How to Overcome Procrastination and Start Doing What Matters 4Is Procrastination Bad? The Truth About Procrastination Revealed 5The Gentle Art of Saying No

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                  Last Updated on August 16, 2018

                  The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

                  The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder That Works)

                  No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                  Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                  Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system”.

                  A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                  Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                  In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                  The power of habit

                  A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                  For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                  This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                  The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                  That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being six hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                  Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                  The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                  Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                  But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                  The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                  The wonderful thing about triggers (reminders)

                  A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                  For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                  But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                  If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                  For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                  These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                  For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                  How to make a reminder works for you

                  Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                  Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                  Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                  My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                  Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                  I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

                  Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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