Advertising
Advertising

Five Things Every Adoptive Mom Needs to Know

Five Things Every Adoptive Mom Needs to Know

It’s a story familiar to many adoptive moms but rarely talked about: You trek through mounds of paperwork, cash in your savings and clear space in your heart and home to welcome your bundle of joy…only to realize your uphill battle has just begun. While you’re thrilled to join the ranks of 135,000 other moms across the country in building your family through adoption, it’s hard to work out day-to-day issues in your home. Between the food hoarding, bed-wetting, back talking–and the list goes on and on…you love your child like crazy and you want the world to know you’re grateful for this parenting privilege! But you’re afraid they’ll think less of you and your children if you share your hardship.

If this is your story, you are not alone. Your journey might be unique but your struggles are not. Remembering these five things kept me in check along my own adoptive motherhood journey and I hope they’re a help to you:

Advertising

Your gain is their grief.

When we adopt our children, we like to believe their stories start with us–with the “point of rescue”, so to speak. But that’s a lie. Kids who are adopted lose so much when they’re ripped away from their cultural heritage, the only people who cared for them in their formative years and taken to a foreign land where they have to quickly learn to adapt to a new language, new food, and new smells. The best way to earn your child’s trust is to meet them where they are. To this day, my daughter won’t eat a PB&J sandwich. So we crank up the rice cooker and serve her foods that remind her of home. It’s a culinary adventure for the whole family to create and eat interesting dishes from our child’s birth country! We celebrate Chinese New Year with a feast and we’re saving up money to take her on a tour of her homeland someday. Paying homage to your child’s heritage makes them feel connected to their roots and reminds the whole family that we’re all world citizens taking part in a global conversation.

Don’t take it personally.

When your kids come from a hard place, you need to know that sometimes they will spar with you because you’re a safe place for them to work out insecurities buried inside. Don’t give up. See a counselor who specializes in adoptive family dynamics. Manage your expectations. Consider it a badge of honor when your kids pick a fight over school work or curfew! I’ve got a girlfriend who welcomed two teenage boys into her home. Their birth mom spiraled down a pit of drug addiction and they had nowhere to turn. So she invited them in with open arms and threw her whole self into loving, educating and providing for these kids. One kid adapted quickly to the love and structure she offered. The other kid cursed her out, pushed away her hugs and stole money from her purse. Her heart broke in two but she pressed on. She realized, it’s not about me, it’s about them.

Advertising

Dismiss conventional wisdom.

There’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all parenting advice. But especially as an adoptive parent, you need to be mindful that a different perspective needs to inform your parenting. When a child throws a fit, conventional wisdom says: “Put him or her in time-out.” But adoptive moms need to know that time-outs can reinforce feelings of isolation, rejection and lack of nurture.

Using “time-ins” in which a child sits next to you in a chair for a specified amount of time accomplishes the same thing as a “time-out” but communicates to your child that you’re not sending them away from your presence. Remember that your child has missed out on those newborn “mom on demand” years and maybe your child needs that. One adoptive mom of a five-year-old shared this bonding breakthrough with me: She held her 40-pound child in a rocking chair as though he was a baby and fed him juice through a sippy cup while gazing in his eyes. This looks ridiculous from the outside looking in, but studies show this can help form synapses in the brain that your child may have missed out on.

Advertising

Don’t expect gratitude from your kids–but take time to honor gratitude in your journey.

Chances are, your child didn’t ask to be rescued from a hard place. You made the good-hearted choice to build your family through adoption. Your kids may never thank you for it but you can keep a catalog of your gratitude. Even during the hard times–perhaps especially during the hard times–this record of thanks will keep your perspective on track as you do your hard work. Studies show this practice is an easy way to release toxic emotions like stress and frustration as you hit roadblocks along your parenting journey. And as you focus on the progress you’re making, it encourages you to keep going in a forward direction, even when you feel like you’re falling behind.

Social media can work in your favor.

We’re not meant to mother in isolation. A solid support system can be found with the click of Facebook where adoptive moms are eager to share resources, swap stories and encourage each other. Every issue ranging from “Reactive Attachment Disorder” to “Open Adoption” to “Special Needs Overseas Adoption” can be found on Facebook. I’m a member of several groups that chat online and one that meets face-to-face. Entering a judgment-free zone whether on the web or in person allows moms to vent, ask questions and share their stories. It’s the greatest fuel I can access to fill my gas tank when it’s running on empty.  Do yourself a favor and fill up your tank. You need to press on because your children need you.

Advertising

Featured photo credit: Hadley’s Gotcha Day/Jeff Hopkins via facebook.com

More by this author

7 Signs Your Adult Children Truly Are Adults People Who Blend Storytelling In Their Life Live More Awesome Five Things Every Adoptive Mom Needs to Know 7 Sweet Moments Only Long Distance Couples Can Experience Morning Sickness Remedies Check out These 5 Morning Sickness Remedies

Trending in Motherhood

1 5 Ways to Ease Back to Work Without Nanny Anxiety 2 5 Survival Tips Parents Can Use to Successfully Navigate Through The “Terrible Twos” 3 9 Unforgettable Things My Mother Taught Me 4 10 Prom Tips from One Mom to Another 5 Baby Shower? Fret Not, Here Are Some Great Ideas To Get You Started

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Published on January 30, 2019

How to Support a Working Mother as a Working Father

How to Support a Working Mother as a Working Father

In roughly 60 percent of two-parent households with children under the age of 18, both parents work full time. But who takes time off work when the kids are sick in your house? And if you are a manager, how do you react when a man says he needs time to take his baby to the pediatrician?

The sad truth is, the default in many companies and families is to value the man’s work over the woman’s—even when there is no significant difference in their professional obligations or compensation. This translates into stereotypes in the workplace that women are the primary caregivers, which can negatively impact women’s success on the job and their upward mobility.

According to a Pew Research Center analysis of long-term time-use data (1965–2011), fathers in dual-income couples devote significantly less time than mothers do to child care.[1] Dads are doing more than twice as much housework as they used to (from an average of about four hours per week to about 10 hours), but there is still a significant imbalance.

This is not just an issue between spouses; it’s a workplace culture issue. In many offices, it is still taboo for dads to openly express that they have family obligations that need their attention. In contrast, the assumption that moms will be on the front lines of any family crisis is one that runs deep.

Consider an example from my company. A few years back, one of our team members joined us for an off-site meeting soon after returning from maternity leave. Not even two hours into her trip, her husband called to say that the baby had been crying nonstop. While there was little our colleague could practically do to help with the situation, this call was clearly unsettling, and the result was that her attention was divided for the rest of an important business dinner.

This was her first night away since the baby’s birth, and I know that her spouse had already been on several business trips before this event. Yet, I doubt she called him during his conferences to ask child-care questions. Like so many moms everywhere, she was expected to figure things out on her own.

Advertising

The numbers show that this story is far from the exception. In another Pew survey, 47 percent of dual-income parents agreed that the moms take on more of the work when a child gets sick.[2] In addition, 39 percent of working mothers said they had taken a significant amount of time off from work to care for their child compared to just 24 percent of working fathers. Mothers are also more likely than fathers (27 percent to 10 percent) to say they had quit their job at some point for family reasons.

Before any amazing stay-at-home-dads post an angry rebuttal comment, I want to be very clear that I am not judging how families choose to divide and conquer their personal and professional responsibilities; that’s 100 percent their prerogative. Rather, I am taking aim at the culture of inequity that persists even when spouses have similar or identical professional responsibilities. This is an important issue for all of us because we are leaving untapped business and human potential on the table.

What’s more, I think my fellow men can do a lot about this. For those out there who still privately think that being a good dad just means helping out mom, it’s time to man up. Stop expecting working partners—who have similar professional responsibilities—to bear the majority of the child-care responsibilities as well.

Consider these ways to support your working spouse:

1. Have higher expectations for yourself as a father; you are a parent, not a babysitter.

Know who your pediatrician is and how to reach him or her. Have a back-up plan for transportation and emergency coverage.

Don’t simply expect your partner to manage all these invisible tasks on her own. Parenting takes effort and preparation for the unexpected.

Advertising

As in other areas of life, the way to build confidence is to learn by doing. Moms aren’t born knowing how to do this stuff any more than dads are.

2. Treat your partner the way you’d want to be treated.

I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve heard a man on a business trip say to his wife on a call something to the effect of, “I am in the middle of a meeting. What do you want me to do about it?”

However, when the tables are turned, men often make that same call at the first sign of trouble.

Distractions like this make it difficult to focus and engage with work, which perpetuates the stereotype that working moms aren’t sufficiently committed.

When you’re in charge of the kids, do what she would do: Figure it out.

3. When you need to take care of your kids, don’t make an excuse that revolves around your partner’s availability.

This implies that the children are her first priority and your second.

Advertising

I admit I have been guilty in the past of telling clients, “I have the kids today because my wife had something she could not move.” What I should have said was, “I’m taking care of my kids today.”

Why is it so hard for men to admit they have personal responsibilities? Remember that you are setting an example for your sons and daughters, and do the right thing.

4. As a manager, be supportive of both your male and female colleagues when unexpected situations arise at home.

No one likes or wants disruptions, but life happens, and everyone will face a day when the troubling phone call comes from his sitter, her school nurse, or even elderly parents.

Accommodating personal needs is not a sign of weakness as a leader. Employees will be more likely to do great work if they know that you care about their personal obligations and family—and show them that you care about your own.

5. Don’t keep score or track time.

At home, it’s juvenile to get into debates about who last changed a diaper or did the dishes; everyone needs to contribute, but the big picture is what matters. Is everyone healthy and getting enough sleep? Are you enjoying each other’s company?

In business, too, avoid the trap of punching a clock. The focus should be on outcomes and performance rather than effort and inputs. That’s the way to maintain momentum toward overall goals.

Advertising

The Bottom Line

To be clear, I recognize that a great many working dads are doing a terrific job both on the home front and in their professional lives. My concern is that these standouts often aren’t visible to their colleagues; they intentionally or inadvertently let their work as parents fly under the radar. Dads need to be open and honest about family responsibilities to change perceptions in the workplace.

The question “How do you balance it all?” should not be something that’s just asked of women. Frankly, no one can answer that question. Juggling a career and parental responsibilities is tough. At times, really tough.

But it’s something that more parents should be doing together, as a team. This can be a real bonus for the couple relationship as well, because nothing gets in the way of good partnership faster than feelings of inequity.

On the plus side, I can tell you that parenting skills really do get better with practice—and that’s great for people of both sexes. I think our cultural expectations that women are the “nurturers” and men are the “providers” needs to evolve. Expanding these definitions will open the doors to richer contributions from everyone, because women can and should be both—and so should men.

Featured photo credit: NeONBRAND via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next