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Does Having More Than 11 Moles On Your Right Arm Mean A Higher Risk Of Suffering From Skin Cancer?

Does Having More Than 11 Moles On Your Right Arm Mean A Higher Risk Of Suffering From Skin Cancer?

As the scientific community tries to target cancer and ways to fight it, they are also trying to find ways to detect it earlier. Earlier detection allows for earlier treatment and that leads to better outcomes for the patients battling cancer. This article will give some insight on skin cancer and research being conducted to assess risks. It will also provide a link to additional information on the recent studies being conducted. This study provides a lot of hope for finding skin cancer and stopping it in it’s tracks. Something we all hope to see in our life time.

What Do These Studies Mean?

The British studies conducted to try to predict risk factors for skin cancer zero’d in on the number of moles that a person has on their body. One thing that seems clear is that people who have a greater number of moles on their bodies overall, also have a greater risk of getting skin cancer. Many physicians don’t perform a count during routine exams unless there is a concern. This leads to later detection.

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In the study they tried to isolate parts of the body to count moles and draw conclusions on what that might mean for the rest of the body. The study suggested that the body part that gave the best clue was the right arm. They were able to estimate the number of overall moles on the body based on the number of moles on that particular body part. The researches did recorded the number of moles on 17 different sites and compared them to the body as a whole to see which body part best showed how the body as a whole was. The right arm was seemingly the most accurate indication of what the rest of the body would show in terms of moles.

How Was Study Conducted?

British researchers initially conducted the study using sets of twins (that were female and white.) Then the study was repeated with women and men. Adding in more variables. They found that if you had over 11 moles on your right arm the risk is higher for having skin cancer. People who had over 11 moles on their right arm had over 100 moles on their whole body. This is important because the number of moles is reflective of chances that a person will have skin cancer.

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Additional Information

Other interesting points facts that were turned up in the study pointed to where people will most likely find skin cancer. Surprisingly women and men differ in the places that they are most likely to find them. Women will usually find the cancerous mole on their arms or legs, while men will typically find the mole on their back.

The article on Washington Post states that previous studies show a risk increase of 2 to 4 percent per mole.

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The study is summed up best with a quote from Ribero from the Department of Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology when he says this study “Would mean that more patients at risk of melanoma can be identified and monitored.”

While this research gets us closer, there are things you can do yourself to keep track of your moles. There was a new app released from the Oregon Health & Science University called Mole Mapper that allows track your moles. Important information like size and the ability to take photos to see how the shape may change over time are some of the key features to help users have a more active role in monitoring their moles. If you are unable to go to the dermatologist or primary physician this app is the next best thing in mole tracking.

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Please head to this site for additional information on the 11 mole rule and what it means for skin cancer.

Featured photo credit: pixabay via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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