Advertising
Advertising

Like A Boss! 8 Entrepreneurial Skills Your Children Should Learn

Like A Boss! 8 Entrepreneurial Skills Your Children Should Learn

As humans, we are always learning new things and skills off of each other to help us improve and this doesn’t change whether you’re a child or an adult.

Teaching some of the essential skills that entrepreneurs need to succeed in business to children at a young age can pay massive dividends, as it can not only help them be better people and be better at understanding others around them but it can also teach them about how best to tackle situations in the future. Knowing how to handle success or failure can be a great asset for anyone to possess.

Richard Branson put it brilliantly, when he said:

“You don’t learn to walk by following rules. You learn by doing, and by falling over.”

Life experiences can be the biggest lesson that anyone could ever take in learning how to succeed in life. The latest infographic from Pumpic, the cell phone monitoring app, have looked at 8 entrepreneurial skills that can be easily taught and introduced to the children around us to help them prepare to take on their own life experiences.

1. Resilience

h_mr_brave

    “Resilience is all about being able to overcome the unexpected. Sustainability is about survival. The goal of resilience is to thrive.”

    – Jamais Cascio

    Developing a thick skin is essential for anyone to get by in life. There will always be setbacks and hurdles that we will need to overcome and accomplish so be able to have the determination to get back when suffering a blow will be a great skill to have. To inspire this amongst children allow them the opportunity to express their emotions without minimizing their feelings. There are a number of apps out there that can help children to understand their negative feelings and can in turn help them turn them into more positive feelings.

    2. Innovation and creativity

    Ash_Pikachu

      “Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.”
      – Steve Jobs

      Having the ability to think outside the box will able to help anyone solve complex problems and come up with the correct solution needed. Any entrepreneur out there needs to have the creative thinking and understanding to be able to make their place in business. Children can develop their innovative and creative streaks by simply playing. Children engage all of their creative energies when they play. Just make sure it’s not limited to just PC or mobile games, mix it up a bit and let them think and come up with own ideas.

      3. Industriousness

      _78185556_bbc_bob

        “I learned the value of hard work by working hard.”
        – Margaret Mead

        The best entrepreneurs need to have a good working mentality and to understand the value of hard work. To build a strong work ethic among your children, be sure to build independence by giving your kids select chores and duties to do. By giving them the responsibility to get things done they will understand how much it pays off in the end. Lead by example and reduce your own bad habits, including putting your cell phone or tablet away.

        4. Curiosity

        curious_george_12

          “We keep moving forward, opening new doors, and doing new things, because we’re curious and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.”

          – Walt Disney

          Being curious about the world is the best way to figure out how you can add and improve it. Entrepreneurs need to be lifelong learners to be successful and are always looking for the next way to better themselves. Encourage children to start a new hobby and to pursue their interests, even if they are wacky and a bit odd! Taking children to activity centres, museums and other creative spaces will only help to boost their intuitiveness and curiosity.

          5. Self-confidence

          787ab273e5158d494b2b31adfb606320

            “One important key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation.”
            – Arthur Ashe

            Having the ability to believe in yourself and what you’re worth is the cornerstone example of leading a successful life and will help give you the right push needed to take risks and see things fully through to the end. You’ll never realize how having the faith in your own ideas and beliefs will take you far. Encourage children to have their own opinion and allow them enough opportunities to make decisions on their own accord – even if it’s not something you’d do or agree with, it will give them the freedom and chance to express themselves freely without judgement.

            6. Empathy

            Pooh eating honey

              “When you show deep empathy toward others, their defensive energy goes down, and positive energy replaces it. That’s when you can get more creative in solving problems.”
              – Stephen Covey

              Being able to understand, relate to and also support one another will only help take you on leaps and bounds throughout your life and career. Successful entrepreneurs need to be able to understand just how important empathy is to success and can massively help to establish the positive connections needed to get by. Respect your children’s own opinions and individuality and let them be open with their emotions and express them how they feel best to.

              7. Optimism

              Dory

                “Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence.”
                – Helen Keller

                Entrepreneurs need to become great models of expressing optimism. Their efforts to make things happen, and to keep going until they do so, can be a great inspiration to us all. Have a positive outlook and it will have some massive advantages to not only your career, but also to your health. Lead by example – Share positive stories and inspirational videos like TED talks to help them see how other people remain optimistic through thick and thin. If all else fails, just tell them to think one thing: Just keep swimming.

                Advertising

                8. Giving back

                minions-delay

                  “What is important is family, friends, giving back to your community and finding meaning in life.”
                  – Adrian Grenier

                  By encouraging children to help out around the neighborhood or local community, even with something as small as raking leaves for an elderly couple, they can learn the importance of social responsibility. True visionaries aren’t selfish and look for a way to make the world better for EVERYONE instead of one that just makes it better for themselves.

                  Whilst your children might be a bit too young to be heading into the executive boardroom, it’s never too early to teach them these essential skills that can help them thrive in pretty much any situation in their lifetime. You never know, they may be able to teach you a thing or too as well.

                  Check out the infographic below for some more invaluable entrepreneurial skills that you can teach your children, and go forth as the best parent ever.

                  8-entrepreneurial-skills-you-should-teach-your-kids-v2

                    Featured photo credit: Andrés Nieto Porras via flickr.com

                    Advertising

                    More by this author

                    Food Storage: Save Money and the Environment Why Is Eating On-The-Move So Difficult? 5 of the Most Common Defibrillator Myths Busted Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables Calendar: What’s In Season Awesome Candy And Wine Match Maker For This Halloween

                    Trending in Child Education

                    1 Research Finds The Effects Of Homework On Elementary School Students, And The Results Are Surprising 2 5 Tips For Teaching Money Management To Children 3 If You Want Your Kids To Be Successful, Don’t Protect Them In This Way 4 Helpful Things Your Child Should Learn Before They Turn 18 5 The Lessons Chess Can Teach Your Children

                    Read Next

                    Advertising
                    Advertising
                    Advertising

                    Published on January 30, 2019

                    How to Support a Working Mother as a Working Father

                    How to Support a Working Mother as a Working Father

                    In roughly 60 percent of two-parent households with children under the age of 18, both parents work full time. But who takes time off work when the kids are sick in your house? And if you are a manager, how do you react when a man says he needs time to take his baby to the pediatrician?

                    The sad truth is, the default in many companies and families is to value the man’s work over the woman’s—even when there is no significant difference in their professional obligations or compensation. This translates into stereotypes in the workplace that women are the primary caregivers, which can negatively impact women’s success on the job and their upward mobility.

                    According to a Pew Research Center analysis of long-term time-use data (1965–2011), fathers in dual-income couples devote significantly less time than mothers do to child care.[1] Dads are doing more than twice as much housework as they used to (from an average of about four hours per week to about 10 hours), but there is still a significant imbalance.

                    This is not just an issue between spouses; it’s a workplace culture issue. In many offices, it is still taboo for dads to openly express that they have family obligations that need their attention. In contrast, the assumption that moms will be on the front lines of any family crisis is one that runs deep.

                    Consider an example from my company. A few years back, one of our team members joined us for an off-site meeting soon after returning from maternity leave. Not even two hours into her trip, her husband called to say that the baby had been crying nonstop. While there was little our colleague could practically do to help with the situation, this call was clearly unsettling, and the result was that her attention was divided for the rest of an important business dinner.

                    This was her first night away since the baby’s birth, and I know that her spouse had already been on several business trips before this event. Yet, I doubt she called him during his conferences to ask child-care questions. Like so many moms everywhere, she was expected to figure things out on her own.

                    Advertising

                    The numbers show that this story is far from the exception. In another Pew survey, 47 percent of dual-income parents agreed that the moms take on more of the work when a child gets sick.[2] In addition, 39 percent of working mothers said they had taken a significant amount of time off from work to care for their child compared to just 24 percent of working fathers. Mothers are also more likely than fathers (27 percent to 10 percent) to say they had quit their job at some point for family reasons.

                    Before any amazing stay-at-home-dads post an angry rebuttal comment, I want to be very clear that I am not judging how families choose to divide and conquer their personal and professional responsibilities; that’s 100 percent their prerogative. Rather, I am taking aim at the culture of inequity that persists even when spouses have similar or identical professional responsibilities. This is an important issue for all of us because we are leaving untapped business and human potential on the table.

                    What’s more, I think my fellow men can do a lot about this. For those out there who still privately think that being a good dad just means helping out mom, it’s time to man up. Stop expecting working partners—who have similar professional responsibilities—to bear the majority of the child-care responsibilities as well.

                    Consider these ways to support your working spouse:

                    1. Have higher expectations for yourself as a father; you are a parent, not a babysitter.

                    Know who your pediatrician is and how to reach him or her. Have a back-up plan for transportation and emergency coverage.

                    Don’t simply expect your partner to manage all these invisible tasks on her own. Parenting takes effort and preparation for the unexpected.

                    Advertising

                    As in other areas of life, the way to build confidence is to learn by doing. Moms aren’t born knowing how to do this stuff any more than dads are.

                    2. Treat your partner the way you’d want to be treated.

                    I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve heard a man on a business trip say to his wife on a call something to the effect of, “I am in the middle of a meeting. What do you want me to do about it?”

                    However, when the tables are turned, men often make that same call at the first sign of trouble.

                    Distractions like this make it difficult to focus and engage with work, which perpetuates the stereotype that working moms aren’t sufficiently committed.

                    When you’re in charge of the kids, do what she would do: Figure it out.

                    3. When you need to take care of your kids, don’t make an excuse that revolves around your partner’s availability.

                    This implies that the children are her first priority and your second.

                    Advertising

                    I admit I have been guilty in the past of telling clients, “I have the kids today because my wife had something she could not move.” What I should have said was, “I’m taking care of my kids today.”

                    Why is it so hard for men to admit they have personal responsibilities? Remember that you are setting an example for your sons and daughters, and do the right thing.

                    4. As a manager, be supportive of both your male and female colleagues when unexpected situations arise at home.

                    No one likes or wants disruptions, but life happens, and everyone will face a day when the troubling phone call comes from his sitter, her school nurse, or even elderly parents.

                    Accommodating personal needs is not a sign of weakness as a leader. Employees will be more likely to do great work if they know that you care about their personal obligations and family—and show them that you care about your own.

                    5. Don’t keep score or track time.

                    At home, it’s juvenile to get into debates about who last changed a diaper or did the dishes; everyone needs to contribute, but the big picture is what matters. Is everyone healthy and getting enough sleep? Are you enjoying each other’s company?

                    In business, too, avoid the trap of punching a clock. The focus should be on outcomes and performance rather than effort and inputs. That’s the way to maintain momentum toward overall goals.

                    Advertising

                    The Bottom Line

                    To be clear, I recognize that a great many working dads are doing a terrific job both on the home front and in their professional lives. My concern is that these standouts often aren’t visible to their colleagues; they intentionally or inadvertently let their work as parents fly under the radar. Dads need to be open and honest about family responsibilities to change perceptions in the workplace.

                    The question “How do you balance it all?” should not be something that’s just asked of women. Frankly, no one can answer that question. Juggling a career and parental responsibilities is tough. At times, really tough.

                    But it’s something that more parents should be doing together, as a team. This can be a real bonus for the couple relationship as well, because nothing gets in the way of good partnership faster than feelings of inequity.

                    On the plus side, I can tell you that parenting skills really do get better with practice—and that’s great for people of both sexes. I think our cultural expectations that women are the “nurturers” and men are the “providers” needs to evolve. Expanding these definitions will open the doors to richer contributions from everyone, because women can and should be both—and so should men.

                    Featured photo credit: NeONBRAND via unsplash.com

                    Reference

                    Read Next