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5 Important Hacks That Will Teach Your Kids Responsibility and Make the World a Better Place

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5 Important Hacks That Will Teach Your Kids Responsibility and Make the World a Better Place

Today’s world can offer a lot, but it is also full of terrible vices and temptations. Gone are many of the morals and acts of kindness experienced with generations of old. It’s certainly not taught in school anymore, which means the first and last lines of defense lies with mum and dad.

How do you teach your children the importance of responsibility? With a little patience, you can teach your children just about anything, from environmental awareness to working as part of the community and willingly offering help to others. How you do this, of course, will depend on the child’s age and eagerness to learn. With a few simple life hacks, you can readily teach your offspring that life isn’t just about personal profit or selfish gains.

1. Start early.

Childhood can in essence, be defined as a constant state of development. Then, why wait until school age to introduce new ideas? If you start introducing things slowly, there’s a greater chance of this having a stronger impact in later life. Studies have already suggested that children who read more at home cope better at school. So, why not use this natural ability of learning to your advantage?

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Here, at the most early stages, you want to keep it simple with a basic reward scheme. Stars, snacks or points, for example, are great rewards. You can use them to encourage the likes of:

  • Sharing: the ability to share resources will be vital growing up, but here you can simply encourage a sense of selflessness.
  • Not wasting resources: does your child waste food or ask for too much? Start rewarding them for using fewer resources where possible.
  • Respecting others: today’s world is full of horrible people but a little kindness goes a long way. Teaching children to be nice to strangers—including those who value additional company, such as the elderly—is a vital way to avoid one of the more modern of pitfalls.

Similarly, why not look for educational materials? While schools might not stock them, there are authors writing books with environmental messages for younger children.

2. Give them duties.

One of the best ways to teach or encourage new ideals is to give people a direct reason to care. As your children get older, you can do this with additional duties, building upon previous information. Did you teach your child to help with recycling? Now try making that their sole responsibility. Whereas previously, they simply did what they were told, now they have to think for themselves. Is this item recyclable? If so, what material is it? With any luck, they might start finding entire new areas where recycling could be implemented!

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As your children become teenagers, they’re not a far cry from being an adult. As such, let them take charge by giving them specific goals. Now that they’re motivated, goals give them a need to think about the world around them. It’s no longer about pocket money but ensuring the objective is reached.

3. Teach cause and effect.

Adults know that every action has consequences and this is certainly true when dealing with the environment and world around us. Children, on the other hand, often don’t understand what they can’t immediately see. This is why we can often get them to clean the house—as the immediate benefits are obvious—but take longer to recycle or understand the need for alternative resources.

Here are a few examples you can try:

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  • Organic waste: left over food should be recycled, such as compost, not thrown in the bin. Keep an eye on where the food goes and motivate your children to do the right thing.
  • Wasting resources: does one child play with more toys, waste more food, or otherwise cause trouble? Show them that wasting materials this way stretches your financial means. If they can’t share their toys, for instance, then you can’t afford to buy twice as much.
  • Saving money: by teaching to save on water bills or cutting down on power, you can save more on bills. This can easily be turned into a family benefit and, consequently, over-usage will have its drain, too.
  • Encourage green cleaning: involve children with cleaning, but more importantly, support environmentally responsible cleaning. Take them shopping for cleaning items and let them see what choices you make and why. This will breed environmental consciousness as a normal routine and habit.

The trick in all of these is to show the physical consequences. Children and teenagers will then understand the wider effects their decisions can make. In turn, you can help use this to learn about communities (both in your neighborhood and the wider environment) and how everyone is connected.

4. Encourage communal engagement.

While smart technology has its benefits, it often draws many into isolation. For children, teenagers and aspiring adults, this poses a problem. Recent surveys suggest as many as 73% of teenagers have access to a smartphone —50% more than just 4 years ago. Yet these smartphones come at a cost. As social media becomes more important, what happens to community? Environmental awareness and other global responsibilities involve a greater understanding of working and living together.

A simple solution? Limit how much time your children have online. Try cutting down their weekend computer use (or even take their smartphone away). Encourage them to go outside and see the world for themselves; maybe then they’ll notice the effects of littering, not cleaning up and other similar vices. Importantly, maybe they could take up volunteering, especially for a cause that helps the elderly, vulnerable, less privileged, or the environment.

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5. Offer adult roles.

If taking their phone away is too severe, how about letting them look after themselves? Pay as you go phones, for instance, will ensure they can’t spend too much and they’ll quickly realize how expensive these things are. Likewise, why not let them take over shopping duties, with a chance of sharing some of the savings?

During these tasks you can often review and assess how well they are doing. How cheap was the shopping? How effective did they clean the kitchen and how long did it take them? This way, they can statistically track their progress; a useful skill that will do them well in the adult and larger world.

Overall, the world we live in can become more beautiful should we remember to invest more ideals and values unto upcoming generations. The buck stops at the door of parenting and communal efforts. Through these hacks, we can teach our kids more values and responsibility and these will definitely rub off on our beautiful world and the environment for even generations yet unborn.

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Featured photo credit: Parenting/Kevin Phillips via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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