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A Journey Through the History of Cars [Infographic]

A Journey Through the History of Cars [Infographic]

It’s difficult to imagine a world without automotive transport. We are surrounded by the internal combustion engine; it has driven a revolution in mobility that has transformed how we live and the appearance of our cities. This fab interactive infographic tells the story of the big moments and game-changing cars that have defined the journey to today – and what will shape the road ahead.

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    One way or another?

    There was a moment in time when the story of motoring could have headed in a totally different direction. Much of the early motoring buzz was around the potential of electric cars; in the US alone, 30,000 such vehicles were on the roads by 1900. Even earlier, steam and hydrogen-powered alternatives were also widely trailed and tested. If any of these solutions had caught on, the world of transport might have been a very different place.

    But petrol power won the race for early dominance. In 1885, the Benz Motorwagen was the first car to make it to production. Cars remained the preserve of the super wealthy until the post-war boom of mass production in the 1920s. The Ford Model T is widely regarded as the breakthrough – the first truly ‘popular’ car, available to all.

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    From there, the spread of motor vehicles across the world has been as relentless as it has been revolutionary. There are 1.2 billion cars in the world, of which 97.5% are petrol-powered, with the USA leading the way in ownership – with 250 million vehicles on the road. In less than a century, the humble motor vehicle has changed the face of the planet forever – but what does the next century hold for the drivers of tomorrow?

    Around the corner

    The future of cars is bright but there are challenges on the road ahead. Moving towards a safer and more sustainable version of driving is the global direction of travel. The recent Volkswagen emissions scandal has brought concerns about the impact of driving on the environment back on to the front pages of the world’s media. But, in the light of these environmental costs, how will driving change?

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    A market transition is looming; global transformation is imminent, and the big brands are already prepared. But there are new names leading the way – rather than established manufacturers or fuel giants, global tech powers like Google are investing heavily in developing driverless technology, while Apple has recognized the potential benefit of a boom for integrated in-car technology.

    Driverless cars are central to this idea of change – a more sustainable, efficient and less stressful way to travel which could reduce accidents and transform our towns and cities. Concerns around the capacity of computers to make ethical decisions have not yet been resolved, and there remains a reluctance from many drivers to pass control of the wheel over to the machines.

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    Tech wizard Elon Musk, CEO of electro-pioneers Tesla, is very clear about how the future will demand radical changes to our day-to-day habits. According to Musk, a driverless car, ten times safer than one driven by a human, is only five years away – and this is a change that is not just desirable, but necessary. “Some people don’t like change,” he says, “but you need to embrace change if the alternative is disaster.”

    Ominous words, but there’s a lot to celebrate about the global impact of motoring. The car has been a tool for progress and an enabler of personal freedom across the world – and as technology accelerates, things can only get better.

    What do you think the future of motoring holds? Would you trust a driverless car? Let us know!

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    Last Updated on March 13, 2019

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

    You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

    Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

    1. Work on the small tasks.

    When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

    Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

    2. Take a break from your work desk.

    Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

    Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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    3. Upgrade yourself

    Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

    The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

    4. Talk to a friend.

    Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

    Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

    5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

    If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

    Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

    Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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    6. Paint a vision to work towards.

    If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

    Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

    Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

    7. Read a book (or blog).

    The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

    Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

    Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

    8. Have a quick nap.

    If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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    9. Remember why you are doing this.

    Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

    What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

    10. Find some competition.

    Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

    Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

    11. Go exercise.

    Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

    Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

    As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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    Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

    12. Take a good break.

    Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

    Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

    Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

    Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

    More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

    Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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