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Maps That Accurately Show How Americans Speak English Differently From One Other

Maps That Accurately Show How Americans Speak English Differently From One Other

The beauty of America can be found its united diversity. America is a united country with many differences, especially when it comes to pronouncing words. The meaning and pronunciation of words vary by region, city, state or other geographical factors, but that is what makes American English interesting.

Joshua Katz, NC State University PhD student, has mapped out linguist difference in 22 areas, but there are far more than just these 22.

What Do You Call the Miniature Lobsters Found in Streams and Lakes?

pronounce-crayfish

    The Pronunciation of Delicious Goodness Found On Your Ice Cream or Coffee

    pronounce-caramel

      The North Has a Canadian Accent

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      pronounce-been

        Oddly, Two Places Call it a “Boo-wie” Knife

        bowie-knife

          For the Sake of the Kids. Agree On How to Pronounce Crayon

          pronounce-crayon

            In the North You Will Pronounce Your Lawyer as “Loyer”

            pronounce-lawyer

              The South Loves Their Slaw

              pronounce-coleslaw

                The Largest Divide In America

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                this-is-the-deepest-and-most-obvious-linguistic-divide-in-america-its-also-an-example-of-how-everyone-in-south-florida-pronounce

                  Let’s Just All Call it Miracle Whip

                  pronounce-mayonnaise

                    Divided Over What We Wear to Bed

                    pronounce-pajamas

                      Everyone Pronounces Pecan Pie Differently

                      pecan-pie-pronounce

                        Order Your Drink Properly or You Might Get a Weird Look

                        soft-drinks-name

                          What Do You Call Traffic Circles

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                          name-traffic-circles

                            Most of Us Enjoy “Sir-Up” On Our Pancakes

                            pronounce-syrup

                              Philadelphia Likes to Invent Their Own Words

                              subs-name

                                What is a “Blubber”?

                                drink-water-from-in-school

                                  Grab My What for a Run?

                                  tennis-shoes-pronounce

                                    The West Drives On Freeways. The Rest Like to Drive on Highways

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                                    expressway-name

                                      What Do You Call it When It Rains and the Sun is Out?

                                      rain-and-sun

                                        Where is “The City”?

                                        new-york-the-city

                                          Welcome to the Liquor Drive-Thru. What Can We Get You?

                                          drive-thru-liquor-store

                                            Mary is Merry Now That She is Married

                                            pronounce-marry

                                              Featured photo credit: Joshua Katz via static5.businessinsider.com

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                                              Last Updated on December 2, 2018

                                              7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                                              7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                                              When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

                                              You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

                                              1. Connecting them with each other

                                              Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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                                              It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

                                              2. Connect with their emotions

                                              Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

                                              For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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                                              3. Keep going back to the beginning

                                              Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

                                              On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

                                              4. Link to your audience’s motivation

                                              After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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                                              Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

                                              5. Entertain them

                                              While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

                                              Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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                                              6. Appeal to loyalty

                                              Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

                                              In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

                                              7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

                                              Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

                                              Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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